Covers the study of (mostly homogeneous) macroscopic systems from a heat/energy/entropy point of view. Maybe combine with [tag:statistical-mechanics].

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Energy Flux due to Diffusion

Per the Fundamental Thermodynamic Relation, I know that the chemical potential of $i$ represents the energy which would added to a system if a particle of $i$ were added with all other system ...
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2answers
78 views

First law of thermodynamics [closed]

In the first law of thermodynamics, we learned that $W$ and $Q$ are path-dependent quantities, but how are $Q$ and $W$ defined? I mean $W = \int_{\gamma} p(s) ds$ would be one possibility, where ...
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1answer
26 views

Steady State temperature

Let's say I have two opposite sides of a box with temperature $T_{1}$ and $T_{2}$ respectively. And I have calculated the temperature in the region between the two sides. So, just like the equation ...
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0answers
17 views

temperature and velocity exchange

So there is a relation between total temperature and velocity of a fluid. In an adiabatic flow what determines how much one property (velocity or temperature will change)? I know the equation. But ...
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2answers
60 views

Why Does Air Hold More Water When the Air is Warmer?

I know that when the temperature of the air rises, the maximum amount of Water it can hold before the water condenses to water droplets increases. But why is this - has it got something to do with ...
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0answers
27 views

Schottky Anomaly - Heat Capacity

I'm having a little bit of a difficulty understanding the origins of the schottky anomaly at low temperatures in the heat capacity of certain materials with restricted energy levels. As I understand, ...
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0answers
45 views

Work done by heating a balloon with $H_2$ ideal gas

I have a difficulty treating this problem. Could you help me to understand the questions, please (I did my attempt)? Problem Consider a spherical balloon filled with $H_2$ gas. Due to a ...
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45 views

Isentropic efficiency of gas expansion process

let a compressed gas expand. If the process is isentropic, the relationship between its temperature before expansion, and its temperature after expansion is related to its heat capacity ratio. The ...
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1answer
30 views

How constant volume gas thermomether keeps the volume constant?

So the level of mercury on the left is being kept down by the pressure of the gas, correct? When the temperature rises, shouldn't the mercury level on the left go down? And when the mercury level go ...
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2answers
117 views

Do the number of possible microstates increase as temperature decreases?

Entropy change, $\Delta{S}$, can be found from the $\frac{1}{T} - Q$ graph. When the temperature doesn't change during the dispersal of heat energy in the system, the area under the graph is more, ...
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2answers
36 views

resistivity and temperature scan rate

100 amperes pass through a copper bar of $5$x$5$ mm cross-section. The resistivity of copper is $1.7 $x $10^{-8}$ ohm-metres. Its volumetric heat capacity is $3.45$ joules per kelvin per cc. ...
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1answer
51 views

why do we use absolute pressure in thermodynamics

One of my university doctors asked a question and I couldn't find an answer for so If anyone can help I will appreciate that. The question is why in thermodynamics we usually work with absolute ...
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1answer
52 views

What is the density operator for an isothermal–isobaric ensemble (T,p,N)?

In the microcanonical ensemble $(E,V,N)$, the density operator is $$\hat{\rho}=\frac{\delta(\hat{H}-E\,\hat{I})}{Tr(\delta(\hat{H}-E\,\hat{I}))}$$ Where $\hat{H}$ is the Hamiltonian of the system and ...
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2answers
69 views

Residual Entropy - Third Law

I've been told that many systems possess some residual entropy at absolute zero. This would seem to disagree with the 3rd Law of Thermodynamics? How can this be explained physically speaking? I am ...
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2answers
60 views

What's wrong with this way of thinking about greenhouses?

It's a clear day, the sun is shining, warming the ground to 29°. The air is at 26°; a breeze is blowing mixing the air so the temperature is fairly uniform: Now I section a bit of this scene off ...
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0answers
47 views

Why does NASA use gold to hold heat in even though its conductive? [duplicate]

I heard that NASA uses gold to prevent heat loss even though gold is conductive. How does NASA prevent heat loss with a conductive material?
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1answer
106 views

A simple experiment and the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution

Consider two containers separated by a removable wall, each side of which is a perfect mirror for the gas in the respective container. Also the walls of the containers are ideal mirrors. In each ...
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1answer
37 views

Van der Waals expansion?

My thermodynamics textbook says that $$pV_m = \frac{RT}{1-\frac{b}{V_m}}-\frac{a}{V_m}$$ where $b$ and $a$ are van der Waal's coefficients. Then it uses this expansions as follows: $$(1-x)^{-1}= ...
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1answer
48 views

Coefficient of volume expansion for gases

I often read that at 0 degree (Centigrade), gases expand by 1/273 of its volume at 0 degree for one degree rise in temp. So does this coefficient of expansion ( i.e. 1/273) change with temperature?
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Cooling a satellite

Satellites are isolated systems, the only way for it to transfer body heat to outer space is thermal radiation. There are solar panels, so there is continuous energy flow to inner system. No airflow ...
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0answers
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In supersonic flow, why must area increase in order to have velocity increase?

Based on the area velocity relation: $\frac{dA}{A}=(M^2-1)\frac{du}{u}$ For M > 1, in order to increase u, we must increase A. I'm wondering what the explanation is physically and why it is opposite ...
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1answer
59 views

How does the movement of molecules change at the edge of a liquid?

I am thinking about how the velocity of molecules measured from a small region of space might change as the region of inquiry moves closer to the edge of a container. Ultimately I am thinking about MR ...
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3answers
103 views

Entropy Change in an irreversible process

I have just started learning thermodynamics and the concept of entropy confuses me. Suppose I have a gas in a cylindrical container fitted with a piston. I take it through an adiabatic irreversible ...
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0answers
31 views

Why is not pressure as effective as temperature in changing the internal energy of solids?

The internal energy is mainly dependent on temperature in all gas, liquid and solid just because an increase in temperature makes the velocity of system's atoms greater. By the time we compress a ...
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1answer
54 views

If entropy of a closed system decreases by a certain amount, why does not the entropy of the surroundings increase by the same amount? [duplicate]

As said by the Second law of thermodynamics, Energy spontaneously disperses from being localized to being spread out if not hindered from doing so. Now, for systems other than isolated one, and ...
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6answers
707 views

Gibbs free energy intuition

What is Gibbs free energy? As my book explains: Gibbs energy is the energy of a system available for work. So, what does it want to tell? Why is it free? Energy means ability to do work. What is ...
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1answer
66 views

Can diffusion,osmosis be explained by second law of thermodynamics?

Second law of thermodynamics states: Energy tends to disperse from localized to more spread out form, if not hindered from doing so. So, can the two processes diffusion,osmosis be explained by ...
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3answers
70 views

Would using a fan cause an air conditioning system to think it's cold?

Recently my office manager said this, after I requested a desk fan: ...using a fan causes a draught, which then leads the air conditioning to believe it’s cooler than it is and it then blows out ...
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0answers
31 views

Johnson Noise: Source of thermal fluctuations

I've read a lot online about Johnson noise being caused by thermal fluctuations, and the Wikipedia page of thermal fluctuations attributes this to the fact that particles don't all have the same ...
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4answers
51 views

Best way to heat something in aluminum foil? [closed]

Let's say we have a wet piece of paper, wrapped in aluminum foil, that we need to heat up in the fastest and most energy efficient way possible (no flamethrower). What would that be? Details ...
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0answers
107 views

Calculate Helmholtz Free Energy with Entropy, Work given [closed]

it's my first time here and I hope the post complies with the general rules. My problem originates here: I'm doing a statistical physics task which unfortunately leaves me clueless atm. I keep my ...
2
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1answer
87 views

Why is the Carnot engine the most efficient?

It seems that the only condition used in proving that the Carnot engine is the most efficient is that it is reversible. More specifically, the Carnot engine can be run in reverse as a refrigerator. ...
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2answers
87 views

What would a graph of temperature increase of a cup of water in a microwave look like?

My lunch had been in the microwave for a minute or so, and I was wondering if I took it out 10 seconds early, would the amount of temperature it increased in that 10 seconds be more significant, less ...
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2answers
54 views

Entropy change in irreversible heat flow

For an irreversible heat flow from an object $A$ at temperature $T_A$ and another object $B$ at temperature $T_B < T_A$ , I'd like to know how to evaluate the change in entropy using the following ...
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1answer
32 views

Difference between solid and gases thermal expansion

The coefficient of linear expansion is $$\Delta L = L \,\alpha \Delta T,$$ where $\Delta t$ can be the difference of any two temperatures. However, in volume expansion of gases, $$\Delta V = V ...
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1answer
49 views

Water behaviour under theoretical near-infinite pressure conditions

I've asked a similar question here but the answer given shows the behaviour of water under general conditions. I'd like to know what the behaviour of water is like as pressures increase towards ...
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2answers
45 views

What unit would the answer be in?

So I have used this formula: $$W= PV_1 \times \ln\frac{V_2}{V_1}$$ and I have converted my values to cubic meters and pascals. So Work Done, $W$, what would be the unit for that answer? I already ...
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1answer
53 views

Physical Meaning Of $ dQ/T $ Regarding Clausius Inequality: Is it related to Energy Loss in form of heat or Something Else?

What is the physical meaning of term $ dQ/T $ in Clausius Inequality $ dQ/T \le dS $ ? Physically we can relate entropy to number of microstates of a system, which relates to number of possible ...
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2answers
119 views

Why does a cooling car engine crackle?

Why does a cooling car engine crackle? What determines the frequency of the crackles?
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3answers
157 views

Interpretation of systems in different state of matters BUT almost identical configuration

For a start, let me clarify that by "almost identical configuration" I mean same volume, temperature and number of molecules (but different pressure). One could for instance take two identical systems ...
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2answers
124 views

How does the second law of thermodynamics follow from low entropy of early universe?

One of the explanations of the second law of thermodynamics is that it goes back to the low entropy in the early universe (How do you prove the second law of thermodynamics from statistical ...
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1answer
166 views

Total and partial derivatives in thermodynamics and Maxwell relations

Consider the expression $$dS=\left(\frac{\partial S}{\partial T}\right)_VdT+\left(\frac{\partial S}{\partial V}\right)_TdV$$ I'm trying to understand how to derive an expression for $\left( ...
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3answers
99 views

Why does the blackbody radiate even at thermal equilibrium?

Everytime, I read about blackbody, I always get confused at the point where it is written Under thermal equilibrium conditions , the blackbody radiation depends only on temperature. ..... . At ...
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0answers
89 views

Why doesn't the 1 dimensional ising model have a transition temperature?

Consider a 1 dimensional chain of spins that are able to either have the value $\sigma =$ $+1$, $-1$, from now on referred to as up and down. For the Hamiltonian $H = J \sum_{i,j} \sigma_i \sigma_j$ ...
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1answer
96 views

Heat Transfer and Thermal Energy

Some hot water radiators have a single pipe connected to them. The steam comes to the radiator and the water leaves in the same pipe. The steam and the water are both at a temperature of 100°C. Where ...
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1answer
37 views

Thermodynamics - ideal gas [closed]

Question: 1 mol of a monoatomic gas at 298 Kelvin acquires a volume of 3 litres. It is expanded adiabatically and reversibly to a pressure of of 1 atm. It is then compressed isothermally and ...
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1answer
115 views

Rate of Temperature Change due to Heat addition

I might be wrong but I will give a little background leading to my question. I am trying to calculate the heat generation in the advection-diffusion equation for heat generation due to friction by ...
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1answer
73 views

How does a giant walk-in fridge maintain a thin temperature gradient at the entrance?

I'm standing in a Costco store, and they have a large walled off area for chilled produce. The entrance to this section is a square opening about 10 feet on a side. When you walk in, you notice a ...
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1answer
58 views

How to convert cc to bar?

In astronomy/astrophysics, medium density is often given in cc, particles per cubic centimeter. Also, the temperature of the medium is usually given, in Kelvins. For some materials the melting point ...
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36 views

Deriving an Expression for Helmoltz free energy

Given the equations of states for an isolated system: $$E=\frac32 pV$$ $$p=aVT^4$$ I was asked to find the Helmoltz free energy per particle, $F=E-TS$, as a function of $T$ and $V$. I began with the ...