Covers the study of (mostly homogeneous) macroscopic systems from a heat/energy/entropy point of view. Maybe combine with [tag:statistical-mechanics].

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Why there is no negative temperature [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Prove that negative absolute temperatures are actually hotter than positive absolute temperatures Proof of existence of lowest temperature $0 K$ On the Kelvin ...
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474 views

What forces are at play when molecules wiggle (due to heat)?

What forces are at play when molecules wiggle (due to heat)? Or in other words, What makes them move?
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708 views

Are negative temperatures typically associated with negative absolute pressures?

Negative temperatures and negative absolute pressures are both possible in physical systems. Negative temperatures arise in (for example) populations of two-state systems, which have a maximum amount ...
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770 views

How to properly bake a ultra high vacuum chamber?

I need to get rid of water excess in my vacuum chamber, and for that there is the procedure of baking. In order to do that there are several things that one needs to consider, the power, heat load, ...
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228 views

Gas pressure equalisation: Where does the excess energy go?

Assume for purposes of discussion a closed container with a concentration of gas on one side and near-vacuum on the other. We could let the gas pressure equalise naturally, or we could construct a ...
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“This is not a perpetual motion machine, because reservoir temperatures are changing.” Is it a valid argument?

I've already faced this situation several times: given a statement (in area of thermodynamics) I used it to provide an example of some perpetual motion machine (of first or second kind). Therefore, I ...
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255 views

Carnot cycle: What happens to the rest of the energy?

In a Carnot cycle, the work potential is $W =Q_{in}( 1-\frac{T_0}{T_R})$ where $T_0$ is the temperature of the sink, $T_{R}$ is the temperature of the source heat reservoir, and $Q_{in}$ is the heat ...
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465 views

Does a concave or flat bottom pan use heat more efficiently?

This may be anecdotal. Playing in the kitchen I realized the frying pan comes with both a flat, and a concave bottom. So here's the question - Given two pans made of brass, one has a concave base ...
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225 views

Supermarket refrigerator - why is it noticebable colder in this shop area?

As we know fridge can't cool room in which it is (according to Second Law of Thermodynamics, heat emitted by fridge is greater than heat absorped). However, when we go next to the fridge in ...
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128 views

Physics of homebrewing heat exchangers

In homebrewing on of the key steps when brewing with extract is to rapidly chill the wort from boiling temperatures to about 80F in 30 min. This is needed to reduce risk of environmental ...
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107 views

Thermal Expansion. Is there a way to fix my bottle?

I did something very stupid tonight. I poured hot water into an polyethylene water bottle and it immediately contracted causing it to overflow and burn my hand and leg. I immediately wasted my hand ...
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335 views

Which heated, partially filled bottle will explode first?

This is in reference to a pasteurization discussion on a homebrewing forum. I have four closed bottles which will explode if containing too much pressure. Two of them are 50% full (A and B), and two ...
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1k views

Does negative temperature in Carnot cycle yield a counterexample of the second law of thermodynamics?

By Carnot Theorem, the efficiency of Carnot cycle is$$\eta=1-\frac{T_C}{T_H}$$ where $T_C$,$T_H$ are the absolute temperature of the cold reservoir and hot reservoir respectively. Since $T_C > 0$, ...
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What kind of cooling mechanism could be used in outer space?

This question arises out of this question on Quora - Apollo 11: 1969 Moon Landing: Did Neil Armstrong really land on the moon? I'm convinced with most of the explanations provided in the first ...
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104 views

What is the energy in eV between atoms in a typical solid state material?

Comps 2 question: What is the energy in eV between atoms in a typical solid state material ? Just rough estimate ? How is that related to the thermal energy that needs to be supplied in order to ...
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1k views

Salt and boiling speed

When we add a compound (salt) to a solvent, the boiling points rises. But, what could we say about the speed the solvent reaches the boiling point? It's better to add salt before or after boiling ...
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3answers
2k views

Does Nantenna (nano antenna) violates 2nd Law of Thermodynamics?

Does Nantenna (nano antenna) violates 2nd Law of Thermodynamics ? Nantennas absorb infrared heat and convert it in direct current. Quote from Wikipedia: He did not discuss whether or not this ...
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670 views

ratio between work and heat [closed]

I am really stuck on a problem in my textbook: Water is heated in an open pan where the air pressure is one atmosphere. The water remains a liquid, which expands by a small amount as it is heated. ...
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2k views

Will adding cold water to a hot iron pan harm it? Why/why not?

Adding cold water to a aluminum pan can be harmful. Is this same with iron pan too? How can it be explained?
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14k views

Thermodynamics - Sign convention

I use the sign convention: Heat absorbed by the system = $q+$ (positive) Heat evolved by the system = $q-$ (negative) Work done on the system = $w +$ (positive) Work done by the system = $w -$ ...
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6k views

What makes water boil?

Basically how boiling takes place? Also like to know... What makes boiling point alter at various altitudes? Why bubbles rise through boiling water?
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256 views

Why does an ice rink use a primary and secondary coolant?

A normal refrigeration cycle uses one coolant, so why does vapor compression cycle of an ice rink you a primary coolant and a secondary coolant?
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9k views

How much work is needed to compress a certain volume of gas?

I want to know the formula (and what does the symbols stand for) for how much work is needed to compress a certain volume of gas?
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1k views

Why can't I evaporate water without wind, just heat? (not boiling,evaporating!) Or can I?

So here is the thing, I searched all over the internet for this but all the sources say that I need wind because the process of evaporation goes as follow: Water particles at the top layer with ...
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450 views

State-dependent diffusions: Fick's law vs. Fokker-Planck's, which and why?

Consider a "state-dependent diffusion": a diffusion process for which the diffusion coefficient $D(x)$ depends on the (stochastic) state $x$ of the system. (An example is provided by the diffusion of ...
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539 views

Carnot Engine for Finite Reservoirs

Two solid, finite thermal reservoirs have temperatures of $T_1$ and $T_2$ respectively and an engine operates between the two. Assume $T_1 > T_2$ and that each reservoir has constant heat capacity ...
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2k views

What is the difference between infrared heat and “regular” heat?

In Feynman's terms temperature is the speed at which atoms are 'jiggling'. Now, let's suppose I've just eaten a sizable dinner, and my body temperature just got a tad up. Am I emitting more photons in ...
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205 views

Zero entropy change

If you put a object in contact with a heat reservoir that is infinitesimally higher in temperature than the object and allow equilibrium to be reached the entropy change is zero right?
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3k views

Work on ideal gas by piston

Imagine a thermally insulated cylinder containing a ideal gas closed at one end by a piston. If the piston is moved rapidly, so the gas expands from $V_i$ to $V_f$. The expanding gas will do work ...
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Where does the lost energy go in a rubber band powering a rotating shaft?

Okay, I'm no physics whiz, and this has me stumped. You know those toy airplanes you can get with the rubber-band driven propellers? You twist the propeller a bunch of times, and this stores ...
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Crash course in classical thermodynamics

I've been working on some projects lately where it would be very handy to know more about thermodynamics than I do, but sadly I never had a chance to take a proper thermodynamics course in college. ...
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What is the meaning of following expression $C=\frac{\delta Q}{dT}$ mathematically?

Our professor raised the following question during our lecture in Statistical Physics (even so it's related to Thermodynamics): Many text books (even Wikipedia) writes wrong expressions (from ...
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Temperature measurement, precision

I am having problems with one of the problems I have done (a) which is basically $\theta = 273.16K (19/15) = 346.00K$ For (b) I am given that the length is 15.00cm when the thermometer is incontact ...
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Was the Universe's entropy equal to zero at the Big Bang? Is zero-entropy state unique?

It is postulated by many cosmologists that at the Big Bang time the universe was in an unusual low entropy state. Does this claim specifically mean that the entropy of the initial universe was zero? ...
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How can I determine density of a gas only given temperature?

I have a homework problem where exhaust is traveling through an exhaust system (assumed to be air for simplicity) from and engine and then released into the atmosphere. The exhaust is at a temperature ...
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Is thermal noise “quantum random”?

Is the randomness that can be extracted from thermal noise "as random" (that is, even theoretically inaccessible to measurement according to our knowledge of quantum mechanics, and not just random for ...
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325 views

Do I have the meaning of the property temperature correct?

OKay my book just starts out talking about the vague definition we have for temperature and we ended up with the Zeroth law of Thermodynamics which states: Two systems are in thermal equilibrium ...
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thermodynamics of a dual-face surface in space

This question is a continuation from this one. A material disk have two sides, one that is reflective and another absorptive of electromagnetic radiation in the range where the background cosmic ...
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885 views

Why does it take until the middle of summer before lakes have warm water, but desert sand heats up in hours?

My sister asked me this question and I keep thinking that water would conduct heat much faster than sand. Hence the energy transfer of heat across the lake does not allow it to heat up soon. Sand on ...
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3answers
190 views

Heat Equation Equalities

While studying the heat equation, I ran into a few equalities that I cannot understand. For example, Fourier's law of heat conduction claims that $$\varphi(x,t)=-K_0\frac{\partial u}{\partial x},$$ ...
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100 views

Where does the heat flow in the Earth's crust switch from primarily solar to geothermal?

Ok, maybe more of a geology question than physics, but maybe somebody has been involved in modeling these heat flows? Essentially I'm asking if we know what sort of depth the heat source becomes ...
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1k views

Is carbon dioxide a greenhouse gas? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What experiments prove the greenhouse effect? I am seeking for a proof that CO2 is a greenhouse gas. I posted this on Skeptic.SE recently but found no help in seeking ...
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203 views

Why does the aligning of magnetic dipoles in a material cause its heat capacity to decrease?

This is with regards to adiabatic magnetisation.
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155 views

can hydrogen stay frozen in vacuum?

I've look into the hydrogen state diagram, and it seems that it can be frozen under pressure. Question: Does this mean that hydrogen cannot be kept frozen in a vacuum chamber?
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284 views

Water, can it break through temperature?

If water is heaten up to ridicilously high temperatures, is it possible for the atoms in the molecules to lose their bonds? And if it is possible, isn't this some kind of chain-reaction? Like you ...
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283 views

Dependance of temperature on color of metals

I asked this question because I supposedly did last year, Stanfor Klein which belongs to the Solar Energy Laboratory of the University of Wisconsin says that "the color of a car does not affect its ...
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1answer
626 views

Physics of the electric hot plate

For an electronics experiment, I began wondering about the electric hot-plates (specifically the temperature dependence over time). If I were to measure the given temperature over time, I assume that ...
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2answers
282 views

Entropy: two explanations for the same quantity?

I studied thermodynamics and I saw the following definition for entropy: $$ \Delta S = \int_1^2 \frac{\text{d}Q}{T} $$ that we use to calculate $\Delta S$ for different types of transformations. In ...
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2answers
252 views

relativistic spaceship, CMB radiation and thermodynamics

Scenario: a spaceship is travelling at a high fraction of $c$. The interstellar gas and CMB radiation has blueshifted significantly and we are facing a possible melting of the front radiation shield! ...
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Entropy, flow of informations and fundamental theories

In the hierarchy of theories, first comes hamiltonian theory, from which one deduces kinetics theory, and at last thermodynamics and fluid theories. From a kinetics point of view, entropy and ...