Covers the study of (mostly homogeneous) macroscopic systems from a heat/energy/entropy point of view. Maybe combine with [tag:statistical-mechanics].

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Slow thermal equilibrium

I have a question which is inspired by considering the light field coming off an incandescent lightbulb. As a blackbody radiation field, the light is in thermal equilibrium at temperature $T$, which ...
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3answers
402 views

Proof of existence of lowest temperature $0 K$

Im mathematics there is a concept of infinity meaning that whenever you pick a number and say that it is the smallest/Largest there is a way to further reduce/increase that number by ...
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1answer
1k views
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1answer
166 views

Is a low-current electrical arc harmful to humans?

I've heard that electrical flux non-destructive particle testing machines are considered safe because they use less than 2 amps. I have seen an arc created between two objects do considerable damage, ...
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1answer
595 views

Greatest volumetric heat capacity

Is there any substance with bigger volumetric heat capacity than water? According to this table water has the biggest known VHC. But I can't believe that in the 21. century we have no special material ...
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1answer
170 views

What kind of phases nanoparticles have (gas-solid-liquid)?

If a phase transition requires a number of particles that is in the TD-limit, can nanoparticles (~10 atoms) have phase transitions? What kind of phases and transitions nanoparticles have?
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3answers
340 views

How many particles is needed to observe a phase transition?

This is a question that was rised when we were discussing "what is melting actually". How many particles you need to form a liquid or solid. I have some remarks to point out what I want to know. Q: ...
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1answer
521 views

Thermodynamics, bullet fired into ice

I'm beginning to study basic thermodynamics and I want to solve this exercise: It fires a lead bullet from $3g$ to $30^oC$ with a speed of $240\frac{m}{s}$ to a block of ice at $0^0C$. How much ice ...
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1answer
193 views

Entropy of a black hole can be zero?

Black holes are one of highest density objects in the universe. Because of this high density(m/v) more matter is highly compressed in a very small volume( i am guessing that molecules cant freely move ...
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1answer
116 views

About heat rate and dimensions convention [closed]

Suppose I have a ceiling and its dimension are given in $Z \times C \times Y$, and a it's got a thermal conductivity $k$. Now, I want to know H, or the heat rate. It's given by $ H =\frac{kA(T_h ...
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1answer
261 views

Is a black hole's surface area invariant for distant intertial observers?

Let's imagine I'm very far from any massive objects, so my local space-time is Minkowskian. Off in the distance is a black hole, far enough away that it doesn't noticeably curve space-time near me, ...
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1answer
286 views

Boiling when I plunge my french press?

Occasionally when I make coffee in my french press I experience something odd. It happens pretty infrequently but certainly enough to be curious about. I have the grounds ready in the carafe. The ...
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2answers
427 views

how does heat energy start to speed up a gas molecule?

If it was possible to place a single gas molecule in a cell and freeze it to near absolute zero. What would the molecule do as it thawed out? Would it translate the heat energy into it's electrons ...
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1answer
276 views

How is the logarithmic correction to the entropy of a non extremal black hole derived?

I`ve just read, that for non extremal black holes, there exists a logarithmic (and other) correction(s) to the well known term proportional to the area of the horizon such that $S = \frac{A}{4G} + K ...
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0answers
82 views

Temperature of the CMB when the Earth formed and the faint young Sun paradox

The cosmic microwave background (CMB) has a modern temperature of about 2.7 K. At the time of the origin of the CMB, about 13.6 billion years ago, it had a temperature of about 3000 K. ...
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0answers
148 views

Dissipation when the temperature is not constant

Consider a process where some chemical species diffuses from one part of a system (which I'll call $A$) to another ($B$) at a rate $r$ $\text{mol}\cdot \mathrm s^{-1}$. If the system's temperature is ...
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1answer
5k views

Water Electrolysis Calculations

From Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_electrolysis#Efficiency): The electrolysis of water requires a minimum of 237.13 kJ of electrical energy input to dissociate each mole. Each ...
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2answers
514 views

Ideal gas in a vessel: kinetic energy of particles hitting the vessel's wall

Reading Landau's Statistical Physics Part (3rd Edition), I am trying to calculate the answer to Chapter 39, Problem 3. You are supposed to calculate the total kinetic energy of the particles in an ...
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1answer
118 views

Kerr-Newman black holes and infinite charge

Recall the first law of BH thermodynamics $ dM=\frac{\kappa}{8\pi} dA + \Omega dJ + \Phi dQ $ Now, let's consider the Reissner-Nordstrom solution $J=0$ such that $m>Q$ but only slightly greater. ...
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2answers
15k views

What exactly is the difference between advection and convection?

After reading Wikipedia articles on advection and convection, I still cannot determine whether there is a consensus on a difference between these two terms. Sometimes, the term convection seems to ...
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1answer
291 views

Calculating temperature of water in the freezer

Assuming water volume ($V$), initial water temperature ($T_0$) and environment temperature ($T_e$) are known, what is the easiest way to calculate temperature of water in given time ($T$)? For the ...
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1answer
316 views

Why are turbines built differently when a change of entropy or temperature is involved?

We are talking about turbines for extraction of energy from a fluid. Consider a typical wind turbine, or a francis turbin for water - we have one hub with on set of vanes that are driven by the ...
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1answer
1k views

Mixing Water at Different Temperature

If I have cup of water at room temperature (say, $25^\circ$C). What would be the resultant temperature if I pour another cup of same amount of water at $100^\circ$C to it? Is it simply ...
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1answer
323 views

Efficiency of parallel and sequential heat pumps

Consider two identical heat pumps, for example, split-system air conditioners. There're two ways to make them work - in parallel or sequential. Parallel means that "hot" radiators of the machines are ...
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1answer
1k views

Thermal Energy from Friction on a Rope

Question: A capstan is a rotating drum or cylinder over which a rope or cord slides to provide a great amplification of the rope's tension while keeping both ends free. Since the added tension in the ...
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3answers
412 views

Confusion regarding entropy, reference papers request

1.a In paragraph at Wikipedia/Entropy it is stated: This is because energy supplied at a high temperature (i.e. with low entropy) tends to be more useful than the same amount of energy ...
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1answer
503 views

How would I calculate the convection coefficient in transient convection?

So I have faced a problem dealing with transient conduction and I need a little help with the problem solving concepts. I need to determine how long it would take to reach the final temperature but I ...
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2answers
564 views

Transient radiation--heating a slab

Hey guys I really need help on this problem. A ceramic slab of dimentions 5cm x 10 cm x .25 cm has to be heated to $177\,^{\circ}{\rm C}$. The ceramic slab travels on a conveyor belt traveling at ...
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1answer
399 views

Relation between external magnetic field intensity H, magnetisation M and the entropy?

How are the external magnetic field intensity H, magnetisation M and the entropy related to each other? i.e. if I change the magnetic field intensity by dH what will be the change in entropy dS in ...
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2answers
1k views

Connection between entropy and energy

An isolated system $A$ has entropy $S_a>0$. Next, the isolation of $A$ is temporarily violated, and it has entropy reduced $$S_b ~=~ S_a - S,\space\space\space S\leq S_a.$$ Is it true to say: the ...
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1answer
147 views

Thermodynamics and cross entropy

I am facing with the concept of cross entropy. I would like to know the thermodynamic and statistical meaning of cross entropy (if exists)?
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1answer
82 views

System moves away from equilibrium $\rightarrow$ it has energy added?

Suppose there is an isolated system $A$ at time $(-\infty, t_1)$, whose entropy is $S=S_{max}$, i.e. it is at thermodynamical equilibrium. Between moments $[t_1, t_2)$ the isolation is violated and ...
3
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1answer
761 views

Time it takes for Temperature Change

I have just been thinking about it for a while and would like to see if there is a way to do this problem. The Setup: We have an insulated cup with mass $m_c$ and specific heat $s_c$. The cup is at ...
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1answer
155 views

Reference paper to support information — energy relation ($kT \ln2 \rm\frac{J}{bit}$)

In answer to Maxwell's Demon Constant (Information-Energy equivalence) there is stated that one bit of information allows to perform $kT \cdot \ln2$ Joules of work. Which paper supports the ...
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1answer
130 views

Is a closed system receiving heat guaranteed to have entropy below maximum?

Isolated system will preserve its entropy unchanged (for fully reversible system) or it will increase its entropy (for system with irreversible processes). For a closed system, it can receive energy ...
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4answers
17k views

Why are volume and pressure inversely proportional to each other?

It makes sense, that if you have a balloon and press it down with your hands, the volume will decrease and the pressure will increase. This confirms Boyle's Law, $ pV=k=nRT $. But what if the ...
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1answer
2k views

Why is glass a good conductor of heat?

AFAIK Glass is insulator, it doesn't have free electron. It's said metal is a good conductor of heat because it has free electron, glass doesn't have free electron, why it is a good conductor of heat? ...
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2answers
209 views

How would I go about solving this transient convection problem if the mean fluid temperature is constantly changing?

Let's say I have a ceramic slab on a conveyor belt that is initially at $450\,^{\circ}\mathrm{C}$ and there is air being blown over it at a speed of $35 \frac{m}{s}$ with an ambient temperature of ...
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1answer
1k views

Equations instead of psychrometric charts

I want to create a program that will accurately simulate a condensor. I want to use the data in psychrometric charts. But I cannot and hence want to use equations that show similar data. Any idea ...
3
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1answer
189 views

Interacting system and relaxation times

I got a question I'm not sure how to state precisely or is it even valid. Any help is most welcomed. I stripped the question of all details because I wanted to emphasize my problem, but should ...
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1answer
132 views

nature of glass transition

I am reading in some book: "The glass transition is similar in appearance to a second-order phase transition, but it is not a true thermodynamic phase transition. This is because the transition ...
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2answers
3k views

Is there a simple way to derive a T-S diagram from a p-V diagram for arbitrary processes?

Often, for thermodynamic processes only a p-V diagram is shown. Even without hard figures, the shape of the curve can be helpful to evaluate the process. However, it is hard to figure out for real ...
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5answers
5k views

If I take a bottle of air into space, and open it, where does it go?

It seems to me that space doesn't have any/much air, and if my bottle is full of air, when I open it, where does the air go?
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2answers
425 views

Intuition behind the concept of heat

Even if elementary, I'm afraid I am still not comfortable with the concept of heat. I can picture heat as some kind of incompressible fluid that is transferred from a body to another in such a way ...
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2answers
1k views

Why did the microwave oven only heat my coffe half as much as expected?

A sticker on my microwave oven states its output effect to be 750W, which is 180 calories per second. This means that heating 250g of water by one degree celsius would take 250/180 = 1.4s. Now, my ...
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5answers
7k views

Is fire plasma?

Is Fire a Plasma? If not, what is it then? If yes why, don't we teach kids this basic example? UPDATE: I probably meant a regular commonplace fire of the usual temperature. That should simplify ...
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3answers
825 views

Maximum efficiency for a counter-current heat exchanger (double flux controlled motorized ventilation)

I am not sure if I can explain the question correctly because I don't know the name of this mechanism in English. This is my explanation attempt: In a house, a tube is expelling the air from the ...
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2answers
1k views

How fast is heat transferred by conduction?

How fast is heat transferred by conduction? Is there some simple, but quantitative way that starts from some properties of the material (e.g. its thermal conductivity) and makes rough predictions, for ...
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3answers
2k views

Given constant T, why does P affect internal energy?

It has always bugged me that tables for water (and other) properties have the capability to look up internal energy as a function of both temperature and pressure. If we limit the discussion to ...
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1answer
268 views

What is lambda R in Richardson's Law?

I've got to calculate the thermionic emission through a diode, so I need to use Richardson's Law. However, one thing's got me confused - according to the Wikipedia page: $$J = A_GT^2e^\frac{-W}{kt}$$ ...