1
vote
0answers
21 views

Restrained expansion of a piston/cylinder

Suppose an ideal gas in a piston cylinder has some initial pressure $p_1$, volume $V_1$, and temperature $T_1$. A pin, which holds the piston in place, is suddenly removed, and the gas quickly ...
0
votes
2answers
78 views

Work in Newtonian Mechanics and Thermodynamics

Well, is the basic difference between the work that we learn in Mechanics and that in Thermodynamics? This is because in Mechanics, whenever work of magnitude $W$ is done on a system $S$, then the ...
1
vote
2answers
48 views

Work done by isothermal expansion from two different viewpoints

Consider an adiabatic system as follows. It consists of a gas in a container and a piston. Initially, the system is at equilibrium and the gas inside it occupies a volume $V_i$ at a pressure $p_i$ ...
1
vote
1answer
85 views

Work done by an expanding gas

Today in an engineering thermodynamics lecture, the professor gave an example of a gas doing work. We had a cylinder full of helium at a pressure of something like 200 kPa absolute and the valve was ...
0
votes
0answers
36 views

How does pressurized gas constantly push?

If a gas, such as hydrogen, is pressurized into an air tight container, a force in terms of pascals (or whatever unit you want to use) is exerted, correct? That is what pushes against every surface ...
0
votes
2answers
101 views

Why does the coefficient of performance need to be calculated with $W + Q$?

How much work must a heat pump with a COP of 2.50 do in order to extract 1.00 MJ of thermal energy from the outdoors (the cold reservoir)? The first formula that came into my mind after reading ...
2
votes
1answer
208 views

What is the difference between $Q=\Delta U+W$ and $\Delta U=Q+W$?

Is $Q=\Delta U+W$ for when the the work is done from the system while $\Delta U=Q+W$ is for when the work is done by the system? Will anybody explain this to me, please? When do we use $Q=\Delta ...
4
votes
2answers
177 views

What's the difference between work in thermodynamics and mechanics?

What is the difference between work in thermodynamics and work in mechanics?
0
votes
0answers
61 views

How to relate compression ratio to work input for a compressor in a heat pump

So I need to calculate the COP (Coefficient of Performance) for a 6-ton air conditioner system in terms of the compression ratio. I understand that: $$COP=\frac{Q_L}{W_{net,in}}$$ I cannot find out ...
0
votes
3answers
5k views

What is the sign of the work done on the system and by the system?

What is the sign of the work done on the system and by the system? My chemistry course book says, when work is done on the systems, it is taken positive. When work is done by the system, it is taken ...
2
votes
1answer
675 views

Thermodynamic cycles, when is the work negative/positive?

ever since I begun calculating thermodynamical cycles, I've had problems with determining the sign of the work along a particular bit of the cycle. Of course, I guess that an arbitrary cycle is ...
3
votes
2answers
224 views

How to reconcile the two definitions of work? (mechanical and thermodynamical)

When studying classical mechanics, work is defined as: $W_M=\int F_{tot} \hspace{2 mm} dx$. However, for thermodynamics, work is defined as: $W_T=\int -F_{ext} \hspace{2 mm} dx$. I'm having trouble ...
1
vote
1answer
133 views

Adding heat to a system doesn't equal the work done by gas?

So, I answered a physics question for a class that goes as follows: A gas in a cylinder is kept at a constant pressure of $250000\: \mathrm{Pa}$ while $300\: \mathrm{kJ}$ of heat are added to it, ...
5
votes
1answer
271 views

First law of thermodynamics?

The first law says that the change in internal energy is equal to the work done on the system (W) minus the work done by the system (Q). However, can $Q$ be any kind of work, such as mechanical work? ...
1
vote
2answers
791 views

How is it possible to equate the internal energy at constant volume with the internal energy of an adiabatic process?

I hope my question makes sense. My problem is that, I have read through numerous textbooks that nC(cons. volume)dT = -PdV when deriving the relationship between T and V for an adiabatic process, ...
1
vote
0answers
87 views

How to solve state parameters using these givens for an ideal gas?

In a thermodynamic turbine using air as an ideal gas, given that you have a known inlet temperature value $T_i$, a known exit pressure value $P_e$, a known inlet and exit velocity $V_i$ and $V_e$, a ...
7
votes
3answers
798 views

Energy equation for an open system

I teach undergraduate thermodynamics and I was quite ashamed that I couldn't explain to a student, the following. I thought I'd bring it to physics.SE in hope of providing my student a good ...
1
vote
3answers
2k views

What is $vdp$ work and when do I use it?

I am a little confused, from the first law of thermodynamics (energy conservation) $$\Delta E = \delta Q - \delta W $$ If the amount of work done is a volume expansion of a gas in, say a piston ...
6
votes
4answers
1k views

Is energy the ability to do work?

Here was my argument against this, the second law of thermodynamics, in effect says that, there is no heat engine that can take all of some energy that was transferred to it by heat and do work on ...
0
votes
1answer
116 views

What is the difference of work $W$ and thermal energy $Q$ in thermodynamic Stirling-process for ideal gas?

What is the difference of work $W$ and thermal energy $Q$ in thermodynamic Stirling-process (in simple form) for ideal gas? I think that you need work to preserve this process and you bring thermal ...
3
votes
1answer
888 views

Area under a $pV$ diagram

What does the area under a Pressure volume diagram equal? I read in my textbook it equals 'external' work done, but why is this? First of all, what exactly is external work? Can you get it ...
1
vote
1answer
504 views

ratio between work and heat [closed]

I am really stuck on a problem in my textbook: Water is heated in an open pan where the air pressure is one atmosphere. The water remains a liquid, which expands by a small amount as it is heated. ...
1
vote
3answers
5k views

Thermodynamics - Sign convention

I use the sign convention: Heat absorbed by the system = $q+$ (positive) Heat evolved by the system = $q-$ (negative) Work done on the system = $w +$ (positive) Work done by the system = $w -$ ...
0
votes
1answer
4k views

How much work is needed to compress a certain volume of gas?

I want to know the formula (and what does the symbols stand for) for how much work is needed to compress a certain volume of gas?
0
votes
1answer
81 views

System moves away from equilibrium $\rightarrow$ it has energy added?

Suppose there is an isolated system $A$ at time $(-\infty, t_1)$, whose entropy is $S=S_{max}$, i.e. it is at thermodynamical equilibrium. Between moments $[t_1, t_2)$ the isolation is violated and ...
3
votes
1answer
372 views

Why is the maximum work achieved in reversible processes?

Let us consider an ideal gas. Let it be present initially in a state $(p_1,v_1,t_1)$. Now let it be driven to another state $(p_2,v_2,t_2)$. Why is it so that during this process the maximum work can ...