3
votes
2answers
29 views

Why doesn't water in water barometer boil?

I have read that the pressure in a water barometer at the top of the water column is around 0.5 psi and at such low pressures water should boil at around ~26°C (Room temperature). [1] [2] How ...
0
votes
1answer
24 views

At what gap width between two plates does convection not occur?

Does the Grashof number lead to the answer? The Wikipedia article (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grashof_number) yields an equation for vertical plates $$Gr_L = \frac{g\beta(T_s-T_\infty ...
8
votes
2answers
155 views

What conditions do a bunch of atoms need to satisfy to have a temperature?

What conditions do a bunch of atoms need to satisfy to have a temperature? Suppose that we have a beam of helium atoms travelling in a common straight line, equally spaced with the same velocity. If ...
3
votes
4answers
292 views

Do objects gain and lose heat at the same rate?

For example, if I take an item out of the refrigerator, set it on the counter for a period of time, allow it to warm up a bit (but not so long that it reaches room temperature and stabilizes), and ...
2
votes
0answers
58 views

Does a cooler, submerged in water, keep beer colder, longer?

Looking around the web, I see some submerged bucket-like things, without insulation, and some floating coolers, where the actual cooler is not submerged. Given that your water temperature is lower ...
4
votes
1answer
687 views

The effect of A/C and global warming

I had been thinking about the way an air conditioning system moves heat from one place to another. The unit runs and drops the temp. in the building and raises the temp. outside. Also there is ...
3
votes
3answers
159 views

Existence of negative temperatures and the definition of entropy

How negative temperatures can be possible has been treated on StackExchange before (several times in fact), but in light of some recent academic discussion, most of these answers seem to be possibly ...
1
vote
1answer
54 views

How is heat transferred to a thermometer?

Quick question. I can't seem to find a satisfactory answer online. How does a thermometer measure the average kinetic energy of atmospheric air? I assume that the energy is transferred by molecular ...
4
votes
1answer
158 views

What's the most fundamental definition of temperature?

What's the most fundamental definition of temperature? Is it the definition concern about average energy, number of micro states, or what? By "fundamental", I mean "to be applied" in such general ...
2
votes
2answers
64 views

Invariance of Temperature in Classical Physics

How can we explain that Temperature is a classically frame-independent quantity to high school kids?
6
votes
3answers
395 views

Hot water freezing faster than cold water

This question has puzzled me for a long time. There is already a question like this on Physics.SE. John's answer to the question seems quite satisfying. But when I googled the cause I found this and ...
5
votes
5answers
624 views

Why can't a gas be liquified by pressure above its critical temperature?

What is the cause behind a gas being difficult to liquify above its critical temperature no matter how much pressure is applied on it?
36
votes
4answers
4k views

Why does cold metal seem colder than cold air?

(I apologize for this elementary question. I don't know much about physics.) Let's say that I put a metal pot in the refrigerator for several hours. At this point, I guess, the pot and the air (in ...
1
vote
4answers
50 views

Why does my house seem to warm faster in summer than it cools in winter?

In summers when we switch off the air conditioner, the room seems to instantly get hot again. But in winter, when we switch off the heater the room seems to remain hot for some time. Why this ...
0
votes
2answers
40 views

Question about Charles' law:

Charles's law says that the volume of a given mass of a gas is directly proportional to its absolute temperature. This means if we increase one, the other one is automatically increased. So the ...
2
votes
3answers
193 views

Is it more efficient to stack two Peltier modules or to set them side by side?

Is it more efficient to stack two Peltier modules or to set them side by side? And why? I have a small box that I want to cool down about 20 K below ambient -- cold, but not below freezing. (I want ...
0
votes
1answer
47 views

Exception to weight of hot vs cold water?

I have seen the various posts regarding the comparison of weight of heated and cold water.But is there any contradiction?I live in really hot conditions and as such tap water literally 'boils' ...
5
votes
1answer
83 views

Can water evaporate when frozen?

If an ice cube is stored in a freezer could it evaporate given enough time? Is there a temperature below which water cannot evaporate (even just a little)?
9
votes
2answers
358 views

If temperature is average KE per particle, and heat is total KE of all the particles, how can molar heat capacity vary?

If temperature is defined as the average kinetic energy per particle, and heat energy is defined as the total kinetic energy of all the particles (or more strictly, heat transferred is the total ...
14
votes
1answer
338 views

Why does a water drop on a hot plate at $150^o C$ evaporate faster than on a plate at $200^o C$?

I recently read that: "A drop of water landing on a hot plate at $150^o C \:(300 F)$ evaporates in a few seconds. A drop of water landing on a hot plate at $200^o C \:(400 F)$ survives a whole ...
1
vote
1answer
59 views

What causes a heat generating source to stabilize at a certain temperature? (Answered by myself, I think)

For example, we out a heat sink on a microprocessor to keep it cooler. I understand that if we run 100 watts of electricity through the microprocessor, it will generate 100 watts of heat, or 100 ...
0
votes
3answers
75 views

Is it possible to have $\Delta T\neq 0$ with no heat exchange $Q=0$, no work $W=0$ done, and no change in internal energy $\Delta E=0$?

Is it possible to have $Q=0$, $\Delta E=0$ and $W=0$, but $\Delta T\neq 0$? In particular, if there is no change in internal energy, doesn't that imply it is an isothermal process, and therefore that ...
6
votes
3answers
908 views

How does cold air move through a room

If you turn on a fan in a warm room, it feels as if cold air is being pushed from the fan out in the direction that it's facing, but what's actually happening on a molecular level? When an object is ...
3
votes
3answers
214 views

Is there an upper limit to temperature in thermodynamics or statistical mechanics

In many presentations of statistical mechanics where we have a system of particles having mass, such as the molecules of an ideal gas, the temperature is often equated to the average relative velocity ...
5
votes
3answers
4k views

Does wrapping a wet paper towel around a glass bottle really speed up the cooling process?

There are claims like this one that you can improve the cooling speed of beverages when you put them wrapped in a wet paper towel inside the refrigerator/freezer. I've just tried it by myself and ...
0
votes
1answer
100 views

Time to heat/cool a room

So, I have a basic, very basic, understanding of thermodynamics. I don't take it until next semester. I'm attempting to write a program which plots a temperature over time graph of a room being ...
1
vote
4answers
177 views

Can a thermometer really measure the temperature of a substance?

When we measure the temperature of a substance by using a thermometer and waiting until the two come into thermal equilibrium, the thermometer will not display the original temperature of the ...
2
votes
2answers
106 views

Can you extinguish a fire by cooling down the fuel?

I know that temperature plays a crucial role in the process of ignition, as most combustible materials will spontaneously start burning in presence of enough oxygen when heated above the kindling ...
3
votes
1answer
135 views

How do you explain the fact that when air expands freely into an evacuated chamber from a constant pressure atmosphere, its temperature increases?

I came across this paper: Baker, B. (1999). An easy to perform but often counterintuitive demonstration of gas expansion. American Journal of Physics, 67(8), 712-713. ...
3
votes
2answers
386 views

Physical significance of negative temperature

I read some answers regarding negative temperatures but I think my question is new. I want to know that what is the physical significance of negative temperature. Suppose I say a body has ...
0
votes
1answer
56 views

Comparing unknown temperature scales [closed]

Source: Principles of Physics by Resnick, Halliday, Walker. $9^{th}$ edition. Chapter 18. Problem 6. On a linear $X$ temperature scale, water freezes at $-125.0^0X$ and boils at $360.0^0X$. On a ...
0
votes
1answer
46 views

Density as a function of Temperature?

I know that volume = mass/density....and density is the function of temperature. Is there any standard equation that describes density as a function of temperature? The system I am interested in is ...
0
votes
2answers
176 views

Auto-refrigeration

I'm reading about the auto-refrigeration effect and can't find a really good explanation. Is the idea that when you have your condensed liquid, and then release it into a low pressure environment, ...
1
vote
1answer
69 views

Fluid Temperature as a function of Mass and Ambient Temperature

Problem I am trying to create an equation to calculate fuel temperature based on ambient temperature, heat exchange rate, and mass. The idea is very simple; when the mass is heated, depending on how ...
4
votes
2answers
208 views

Why does my kettle only make a noise when it is turned on

Almost as soon as I turn my kettle on it starts to make the familiar kettle noise, yet very shortly after turning off the power the boiling noise stops and the kettle is totally silent. The ...
0
votes
4answers
95 views

Is vapour pressure based on partial pressures or just total pressure on the liquid?

The explanation for the boiling point of water is that at 100C, the vapour pressure becomes greater than atmospheric pressure. But say you had a a jar of water sealed in argon at 1atm, which is larger ...
0
votes
1answer
61 views

Law of equipartition

Law of equipartition predicts the heat capacity of gases correctly. It assumes that inter-molecular attraction in gases is negligible (which is true). But for solids, inter-molecular attraction is not ...
0
votes
3answers
296 views

Why does the bathroom become hot after a bath?

I have noticed many times that whenever I enter into the bathroom just after someone else bathed the temperature inside it would be high. Is it that the body heat comes out when we pour a lot of ...
0
votes
1answer
194 views

Do ideal gases at zero Kelvin have potential energy?

Do ideal gases at zero Kelvin have potential energy?
0
votes
2answers
53 views

What is concept of temperture in ion trap?

As only several thousands of particles are holding in the ion trap, how can we understand the temperature?
2
votes
1answer
71 views

Details in the derivation of the second law starting from the phase space volume

I had a question on one of the details of the derivation of the second law of thermodynamics starting from the phase space volume. I'll type out what I understand so far: Letting the Hamiltonian ...
3
votes
2answers
109 views

Temperature as frequency spectrum of stress-energy tensor?

I am currently learning general relativity, and in the textbooks that I am reading, temperature seems to be treated as a scalar field, extraneous to the geometry of spacetime. This is puzzling me, ...
3
votes
3answers
642 views

Temperature behavior over time of black or white cars in hot, sunny regions

How does the color of a car influence its inner temperature change over time when parked outside in windless, hot and sunny regions? I know what's the common idea about that: black cars are supposed ...
4
votes
3answers
315 views

Temperature; Why A Fundamental Quantity?

Temperature is just an indication of the combined property of mass of the molecules and their random motion. We can explain no effective energy transfer between two conducting solid bodies in contact ...
1
vote
1answer
91 views

Thermodynamics, temperature below 0 Kelvin [duplicate]

I read a news article about how they were able to create a negative temperature, below absolute zero, and my question is how does this work? I know that there are different definitions of ...
0
votes
2answers
211 views

If quantum gas goes below 0K, is calling 0K absolute zero irrelevant?

Lord Kelvin defined the absolute temperature scale in the mid-1800s in such a way that nothing could be colder than absolute zero. Physicists later realized that the absolute temperature of a gas is ...
1
vote
1answer
71 views

Unheated intermediate room - positive or negative effect on flats temp. insulation?

This is a question I have heard quite some contrary opinions, so I want to ask it here, as it deals with physics in principle:) The question is basically that, if having a unheated intermediate (in ...
2
votes
1answer
220 views

Setting up an equation for calculating how long it takes a body to change temperature in its sorroundings

The United States has just recently been hit by a massive vortex of Arctic air. These unusually bitter temperatures have sparked my interests to ask the following rheotical question: How much time ...
3
votes
2answers
254 views

A draft makes people feel cold. How can that be measured?

On some days our office feels very cold to the point at which we find it difficult to type because our hands have gone numb. But our facilities manager insists it is the same temperature as always. ...
0
votes
1answer
106 views

is this heat calculation equation correct?

If I have a line of copper wire (lets say $\textrm{1 meter}$ long, $\textrm{1 mm}$ thick) and one end is a flattened disk of copper about the size of a quarter, and I apply a lot of heat to it (I'm ...