The temperature-dependant emission of electromagnetic waves. Combine this tag with [tag:thermodynamics] for a macroscopic view or [tag:quantum-mechanics] for a microscopic explanation.

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What are the various physical mechanisms for energy transfer to the photon during blackbody emission?

By conservation of energy, the solid is left in a lower energy state following emission of a photon. Clearly absorption and emission balance at thermal equilibrium, however, thermodynamic equilibrium ...
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Is fire plasma?

Is Fire a Plasma? If not, what is it then? If yes why, don't we teach kids this basic example? UPDATE: I probably meant a regular commonplace fire of the usual temperature. That should simplify ...
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Planck's Law in terms of wavelength

I am drawing a blank when it comes to equation transformation. Wikipedia gives two equations for the spectral radiance of black body: First as a function of frequency $\nu$: $$I(\nu, T) = \frac{2 h ...
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What temperature can you attain with a solar furnace?

A solar furnace is a device that concentrates the sun's light on a small point to heat it up to high temperature. One can imagine that in the limit of being completely surrounded by mirrors, your ...
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What causes a blackbody radiation curve to be continuous?

The ideal blackbody radiation curve (unlike the quantized emission seen from atomic spectra), is continuous over all frequencies. Many objects approximate ideal blackbodies and have radiation curves ...
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117 views

Heat preserving performance of container relative to content

This question has been addressed in the case of a thermos bottle: Performance of a thermos bottle relative to contents I am asking the question again without the hypothesis that it is a thermos ...
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The Pioneer anomaly finally explained?

Pioneer 10 & 11 are robotic space probes launched by the NASA in the early 1970's. After leaving our solar system, an unusual deceleration of both spacecrafts has been measured to be approximately ...
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9answers
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Is darkness really light?

According to this wikipedia article "Consequently, most objects that absorb visible light reemit it as heat. So, although an object may appear dark, it is likely bright at a frequency that humans ...
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719 views

Deriving Planck's radiation law from microscopic considerations?

In the usual derivation of Planck's radiation law, the energies or frequencies $\omega$ of the oscillators depend on the measurements $L$ of the black body. The model is such that the only ...
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What’s the relationship between thermal radiation and Johnson thermal noise?

All objects above absolute zero emit radiation due to random collisions between the atoms they are made of. The spectrum of radiation emitted varies according to the temperature of the object, I ...
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650 views

Thermal radiation spectrum of a blackbody

Why is it that thermal radiation of a black body usually described by a spectral distribution function rather than an intensity vs frequency curve? I have a vague explanation for this: Any measured ...
6
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1answer
261 views

Bunsen Burners and the Sun

Why do Bunsen burners burn blue in the center? What element is being burned? Why does the sun glow yellow, and not blue-a Bunsen burner is much cooler and yet it burns blue. Is it because the ...
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3answers
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How to combat the black-body temperature of an object?

I'm trying to model the temperature of a large spacecraft for a space colony simulation game I'm working on. In another question, I checked my calculations for the steady-state black-body temperature ...
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1answer
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Blackbody radiation force (link), what are the fundamental forces behind it?

Here is a link to an article from phys.org describing what the scientists (M. Sonnleitner at the University of Innsbruck and Innsbruck Medical University in Austria, M. Ritsch-Marte at Innsbruck ...
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Why is the planck function continuous and not discrete?

If we imagine a object made up of Hydrogen gas that is optically thick to all radiation, and is in thermal equilibrium, then, microscopically, photons will be emitted and absorbed as ...
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2answers
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Possible colors of fire?

I have learnt that depending on the various gases those are involved in the reaction that produces fire, different colors (yellow, red or blue) of flames become visible. I have a question .. what are ...
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1answer
131 views

What's the relationship between the energy density of a black-body and its radiant exitance?

Through a bit calculation we can derive that in a cavity, the energy density $$u(f,T)=\overline{E(f)}\times G(f)=\frac{8\pi h}{c^3}\frac{f^3}{e^{h\nu /kT}-1}$$ If we take the integral over all ...
106
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1answer
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Why does NASA use gold foil on equipment and gold-coated visors?

I've read several websites about equipment covered with gold foil and astronaut helmet visors are coated with gold. However, their explanations are devoid of almost all physics content. Can someone ...
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How can the black body radiation formula be so general?

In the derivation of the black body radiation formula, there is nothing whatsoever that relates to a particular/specific material. But we nonetheless use this formula for several distinct sources in ...
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Entropy of radiation emitted into space

In several papers I see something equivalent to the following expression for the entropy of radiation given by an astronomical object such as the Sun (assuming the object can be approximated as a ...
12
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1answer
336 views

Quantum uncertainty of particle falling in black hole

A stationary observer at infinity sees a particle of mass m falling in a supermassive Schwarzschild black hole. He observes an increasing redshift and sees the particle ceasing to progress when it ...
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2answers
225 views

radiation thermodynamics paradox

This question is concerned with a thermodynamic paradox for radiating bodies and radiation in a cavity of a specific shape. Consider two nested shells that are axisymmetric ellipsoids with the same ...
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4answers
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Light emitted by an object according to its temperature

According to this picture the light emitted by an object depends on its temperature. That makes perfect sense when we heat a metal. As its temperature raises we see it red at first, then orange, ...
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2answers
814 views

Why do moving particles emit thermal radiation?

While answering another question about heat in an atom, the discussion in the comments led to the question of how heat is related to thermal radiation picked up by infrared cameras. The answer is that ...
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3answers
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Why is spectrum obtained by sunlight, said to be continuous?

My sir spoke about atomic spectra today. Sir said that, unlike the spectrum obtained by analyzing the sunlight, the spectra of atoms are not continuous. I got a doubt here, i,e even the sunlight ...
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2answers
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Why does Planck's law for black body radiation have that bell-like shape?

I'm trying to understand Planck's law for the black body radiation, and it states that a black body at a certain temperature will have a maximum intensity for the emission at a certain wavelength, and ...
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1answer
136 views

Examples to illustrate temperature dependant radiation by examples of temperature to color relation

I'm looking for a set of examples to illustrate the relation of temperature and color of "glowing" bodies. It should allow to build an intuitive understanding of this relation, so it's not about ...
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1answer
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How do you change Planck's law from frequency to wavelength? [duplicate]

I have to derive Wien's displacement law by using Planck's law. I've tried but I come to a unsolvable equation (well I can't solve it) anywhere I look online it comes to the same conclusion, you need ...
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How can it be that the sun emits more than a black body?

As far as I know, a black body is an ideal emitter. So how can it be that a non-ideal emitter emits more radiation than a black body? This happens only in a very limited area at around 500nm, but it ...
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6answers
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Is “dark clothes for winter, light for summer” relevant?

We are told to wear light clothes in summer as they are better at reflecting sunshine and keeping us cool. And dark clothes absorb sunshine and keep us warm. But is it really relavent? If I buy ...
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3answers
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Quantum mechanics of thermal radiation

What are the quantum mechanisms behind the emission and absorption of thermal radiation at and below room temperature? If the relevant quantum state transitions are molecular (stretching, flexing and ...
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3answers
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Why do lightbulbs continue to glow after the light is turned off?

I've noticed that whenever I turn the lamp off in my room at night, the lightbulb seems to continue to glow for a minute or so after that. It's not bright though; the only way I even notice it is if ...
6
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2answers
196 views

The strange thing about the maximum in Planck's law

I read that it makes a difference whether you calculate $\frac{d \omega}{d \lambda}=0$ or $\frac{d \omega}{d \nu}=0$ in the sense that the maximum energy densit with respect to the wavelength does not ...
5
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2answers
799 views

Is a black body sphere inside a black body shell hotter than the shell?

I am missing something very basic here. Let us assume the shell is at a fixed temperature T by a power generator. The sphere inside will radiate the same power it absorbs. The power radiated by the ...
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Why doesn't diamond glow when hot?

In an answer to this SE question, the respondent explains that heating a perfect diamond will not cause it to glow with thermal blackbody radiation. I don't quite follow his explanation. I think it ...
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Greenhouse gases

A post (below) on the Bishop Hill blog relating to climate change asserts that no warming effect can be attributed to $\mathrm{CO_2}$. I don't know whether the author is really a physicist but it ...
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1answer
351 views

Hawking Radiation: how does a particle ever cross the event horizon?

The heuristic argument for Hawking Radiation is, that a virtual pair-production happens just at the event horizon. One particle goes into the black hole, while the other can be observed as radiation. ...
3
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2answers
331 views

How might a resonant antenna and black body radiation interact?

How does an antenna behave when it is cooled so that its black-body radiation is emitting energy at its resonant frequency? Edit: To clarify, its not how they're related in general, but how might ...
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3answers
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What happens to photons after they hit objects?

If I am not wrong when light hits for example white wall most of the photons are absorbed and transformed into heat and few of the photons at certain wavelength are reflected from the object. So white ...
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4answers
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Which is more efficient, heating water in microwave or electric stove?

So our propane tank in the kitchen ran out again today. Which is more energy efficient, boiling water in a microwave on an electric stove? All things being equal i.e. starting temperature and mass ...
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3answers
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All objects radiate energy, but we cannot see all objects in the dark. Why?

We claim that all objects radiate energy by virtue of their temperature and yet we cannot see all objects in the dark. Why not?
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1answer
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On the atomic level, how is incandescent light structured?

I want to know from the smallest possible originating structures how the light I see generated from heat is made by atoms themselves.
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Temperature of a black-body in LEO on the dark side of the Earth

Questions about the temperature of something in space are often very hard to pin down (example), since there is radiative transfer to/from many different regions in the field of view at dramatically ...