The temperature-dependant emission of electromagnetic waves. Combine this tag with [tag:thermodynamics] for a macroscopic view or [tag:quantum-mechanics] for a microscopic explanation.

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Why black body radiation is all over the frequency range

I was studying black body radiation and how quantization of energy solves the problem of ultraviolet catastrophe. But I have a very fundamental doubt. A black body can be assumed as a cavity with a ...
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3answers
510 views

How do objects heat up?

If every body emits radiation at a given frequency and temperature exactly as well as it absorbs the same radiation, how do objects heat up?
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1answer
272 views

Why do metal surfaces reflect thermal signature?

I recently borrowed a thermal camera from a friend and I tried to observe my palm print over a reflective metallic plate. When I looked at it through the camera, it reflected my thermal signature too. ...
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4answers
721 views

How does quantization solve UV catastrophe in black body radiation? What would happen if there was no Planck constant $h$?

Planck's Law is $$I(\nu,T)=\frac{8\pi\nu^3}{c^2}\cdot\frac{1}{e^{h\nu/kT}−1}$$ This solves the UV catastrophe. For higher frequencies, intensity goes to zero. It does so because of $e^\nu$ not ...
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How can blackbody radition be explained by quantization?

I don't understand why quantization makes a peak on the blackbody radiation curve (so there is no UV catastrophe) and the relationship between that peak and quantization concept. When the blackbody ...
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8answers
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How can the black body radiation formula be so general?

In the derivation of the black body radiation formula, there is nothing whatsoever that relates to a particular/specific material. But we nonetheless use this formula for several distinct sources in ...
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How can it be that the sun emits more than a black body?

As far as I know, a black body is an ideal emitter. So how can it be that a non-ideal emitter emits more radiation than a black body? This happens only in a very limited area at around 500nm, but it ...
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2answers
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How can a metal heated at 600° emit thermal photons at 4000°+?

Suppose we have a cube of metal inside a room at temperature 27°. If we heat the metal up to 600° using uniform radiation of that energy, no part of it should have higher T°, but nevertheless it will ...
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1answer
209 views

Maintaining local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) in radiating gas with a broad atomic transition line

Definitions / Background In LTE, Kirchoff's law for radiation holds: $$ \frac{j_{\nu}}{\alpha_{\nu}} = B_{\nu} (T) $$ where $j_{\nu}$ is the specific radiative emissivity, $\alpha_{\nu}$ is the ...
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How does quantization solve the ultraviolet catastrophe?

I understand how classical physics leads to the UV catastrophe. But I cannot understand how quantization solves it. How can quantization prevent the body from radiating a lot of energy? I know ...
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2answers
350 views

Does blackbody radiation work like this?

In a blackbody object the photons are reflected back and forward. If I heat up the the blackbody object with microwaves or other types of photons the electrons in the wall would vibrate. When the ...
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2answers
181 views

Physical reason why (hot) objects glow? [duplicate]

Every object at a non-zero temperature radiates light, i.e. it glows. (Is that called blackbody radiation?) What is the physical reason to this? Is it because more heat implies that the atoms ...
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How is temperature related to color?

I spent some time studying about temperatures and color of objects. It turns out that as we heat something it turns to red, then yellowish white and if we heat it more it turns to bluish-white. Like ...
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1answer
186 views

Examples to illustrate temperature dependant radiation by examples of temperature to color relation

I'm looking for a set of examples to illustrate the relation of temperature and color of "glowing" bodies. It should allow to build an intuitive understanding of this relation, so it's not about ...
3
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1answer
509 views

Calibrating the relative intensity of a spectrometer with a blackbody source?

I am trying to compare the relative brightness of H-Beta and H-Alpha lines using a CCD spectrometer. In order to correct for the different grating efficiency at the two different wavelengths. I took ...
3
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1answer
67 views

Frequency-averaged (gray) radiative transfer

The equation for radiative transfer is $$ \omega \cdot \nabla I = \kappa(B - I) $$ where $I$ is the intensity of radiation, $\omega$ is the ray direction, $\kappa$ the absorption coefficient, $B$ the ...
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1answer
5k views

Absorption cross section and absorption coefficient

What is the absorption cross section, how is it measured? How to convert it to the absorption coefficient (measured in cm$^{-1}$)?
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0answers
248 views

Absorption coefficient from HITEMP or HITRAN [closed]

How to calculate the absorption coefficient (for radiation) from HITEMP or HITRAN databases? Or where can I find some tables or plots for the absorption coefficient?
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1answer
60 views

Sun radiation in England

I used to live in Italy, and when it was sunny, well, as expected it was pretty hot. Both under the direct light of the sun through the atmosphere, and in the shade, where the temperature was of ...
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1answer
89 views

Question on luminosity of a radiant source and its dependence on temperature, and involvement of Doppler Effect

A few days ago, I happened to go through the chapters on Radiation, and Photometry, studying them at quite an elementary level. I studied Wien's displacement law, and the dependence of luminous flux ...
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5answers
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How badly could someone be injured by concentrated sunlight?

Recently-ish, I stumbled across an interesting short story (by way of Science Fiction & Fantasy Stack Exchange) where a soccer referee is apparently incinerated by concentrated sunlight. Where ...
3
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2answers
193 views

What are the largest thermal gradients achievable in a lab environment?

I am looking for a system capable of creating a gradient of $100\, \mathrm{K}/\mathrm{\mu \textrm{m}}$ on a $30\, \mathrm{\mu}\textrm{m}$ spacing of a system mounted on a Si-N membrane. My so-called ...
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2answers
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Why does my infrared thermometer say the sky is at -2 °C?

I just got myself an infrared thermometer. I wouldn't have been able to predict what temperature it would give me when pointing at the sky, but it turned out to be -2 °C the first time I measured, and ...
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7answers
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How does heat actually stay kept in the carbon molecules in the atmosphere? [duplicate]

We have all learned that the earth is getting heat up because of the CO2 and CO molecules absorbing heat. However, how is heat actually kept in those molecules. When photons heat them up, their ...
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2answers
2k views

If black and white object are in isolated space will the black absorb heat from the white?

This question has come to me from my friend in fact: he noted that the heating in the pub is painted black. I replied that it's better for heat emission. I don't know where did I know that from. And ...
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2answers
133 views

Can the hot combustion products from a large flame be in “non-local thermal equilibrium”

Question: Does it take some time for the hot combustion products from a flame to reach local thermodynamical equilibrium (i.e. for the energy state populations to follow the Boltzmann distribution)? ...
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3answers
119 views

Why do grey body radiators not heat up?

So I'm doing so work on the earth's climate system, and modelling it as a grey body radiators, and I've come across the phrase: "$62\%$ of the outgoing energy is lost to space and the other $32\%$ is ...
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2answers
6k views

Calculate temperature of the earth through blackbody radiation

I don't understand the solutions to a problem about blackbody radiation and was wondering if anybody could help me out. Here is the question: The sun can be considered as a blackbody radiation ...
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1answer
104 views

Does a surface in front of a radiator (not in contact) have a significant effect on the room's temperature or heating rate?

Does a surface in front of a radiator (not in contact) have a significant effect on the room's temperature or heating rate? Some time ago I had a discussion about it, and despite none of us knowing ...
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2answers
2k views

Black body radiation application [closed]

Does it make difference if you paint a wall black or white? If yes, how does it work? Thanks for reading!
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1answer
46 views

Excited Energy levels of Hydrogen vs Solids

My question has to do with Excited Energy Levels. I keep reading and learning that all objects/most solids emit infrared radiation. But to emit radiation, an object's particles must first enter a ...
0
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1answer
88 views

What's wrong with this simple derivation of energy flux in a photon gas?

In a photon gas, we know that pressure, $P$, and energy density, $u$, are related by: $$P=\frac{u}{3}$$ We also know from relativity that the momentum of a photon is $$p=\frac{E}{c}$$ Finally, the ...
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9answers
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Is darkness really light?

According to this wikipedia article "Consequently, most objects that absorb visible light reemit it as heat. So, although an object may appear dark, it is likely bright at a frequency that humans ...
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3answers
179 views

Quantum mechanics: How do the atoms in an electronic circuit enter a smaller orbit on the filament of an incandescent light bulb?

Bear in mind that this is not a homework question, and I have put together some stuff to work on from below: http://www.doublexscience.org/how-fluorescent-lights-work-quantum-mechanics-in-the-home/ ...
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2answers
529 views

Polar ice caps and thermal radiation

I was reading an article on global warming and it said that the polar ice caps, because they are white, reflect a lot of the sun's radiation. The article also has a picture of some houses in England ...
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1answer
142 views

Is temperature discrete

Because an object's temperature is inversely proportional to the wavelength of blackbody radiation which it emits, physicists have theorized the existence of Planck temperature at around $1.4×10^{32}$ ...
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1answer
75 views

Black Body and Electron [closed]

My questions are: How does a black body absorb photons? Why does a black body absorb the most photons of all objects (e.g. those with another color)? Are there any relationship between the ...
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1answer
256 views

Physics and Skin Color: What differences do physicists observe between different skin colors?

I majored in social sciences, so I haven't taken a science class since 1999, so forgive me if I don't ask this right. What difference would skin color make from a physics perspective? Would there be ...
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1answer
45 views

Quantum Temperature?

I was thinking if temperature is proportional to the rate at which energy is transferred then does it exist on a quantum as well as a classical scale? If so what is it proportional to exactly?
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3answers
256 views

Gas vs electric cooking

I've heard it said many times that you're more likely to burn food on an electric stove than a gas one, but I can't tell a difference. This seems to me to be a fallacy perpetuated by the natural gas ...
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0answers
44 views

Do COBE, WMAP, and Plack have design flaws? [duplicate]

MRI expert Pierre-Marie Robitaille on the design flaws of COBE, WMAP, & Planck and the violation Kirchhoff's Law: Here are his talks: Pierre-Marie Robitaille: The Cosmic Microwave Background ...
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1answer
33 views

photoelectric cell

In the photoelectric cell my teacher says that the electron emission from the cathode depends on the frequency of the incident photon and it doesn't depend on the light intensity (I = nhU/ta , Right?) ...
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2answers
4k views

Is a black hole a perfect black body?

A black body absorbs all light/radiation in its reach. According to basic laws of physics, the more energy a body absorbs the more it can emit. Therefore, a black body absorbs all energy directed at ...
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1answer
510 views

Wien's Displacement Law for real bodies

It is known that for perfect blackbodies, $$\lambda T= c$$ where $\lambda= \text{peak wavelength}$ $T= \text{Absolute temperature}$ $c= \text{Wien's constant}$ ...