The temperature-dependant emission of electromagnetic waves. Combine this tag with [tag:thermodynamics] for a macroscopic view or [tag:quantum-mechanics] for a microscopic explanation.

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Hawking (blackbody) radiation, emission or absorption

A black body is classically defined as a perfect absorber of radiation. That seems to fit a black hole pretty well. The only remaining question, then, How do we know that Hawking radiation is emission ...
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90 views

Why is the graph of CMB/black-body radiation asymptotic?

Speaking of this graph of blackbody radiation, I see that the graph goes to 0 asymptotically: As we go to higher and higher frequencies, the energy of a single photon becomes increasingly high. ...
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What happens to photons after they hit objects?

If I am not wrong when light hits for example white wall most of the photons are absorbed and transformed into heat and few of the photons at certain wavelength are reflected from the object. So white ...
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306 views

Asymmetric heat conduction?

So I have this side-view drawing. Now I wonder, will such a multi-layer material have asymmetric heat conduction properties? Namely, because of radiative conduction, reflective aluminum surface ...
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153 views

Modeling a wine cooler heat loss to ambient

I'm trying to model the steady state heat loss to ambient, in W, for a wine cooler similar to the following: For the modeling, I will need the following variables/constants: $T_a$ [K]: Ambient ...
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400 views

How to combat the black-body temperature of an object?

I'm trying to model the temperature of a large spacecraft for a space colony simulation game I'm working on. In another question, I checked my calculations for the steady-state black-body temperature ...
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69 views

Thermometer reading

I quickly plunged a room-temperature thermometer into very hot water, the mercury level went down briefly before going up to a final reading. Why?
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97 views

How does the physical motion of atom lead to photon emission?

It's known that what we call a temperature is in fact molecular motion at microscopic scale. But at which point the emission of photons happens due to this physical motion, so that we can talk about ...
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138 views

Estimating the effect of radiant barrier on the radiant and conductive heat transfer through a metal roof

The basic question is -- Will a radiant reflective coating be more effective applied to the upper surface or the lower surface of a metal? Case 1: Imagine a metal roof subject to solar heating. The ...
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228 views

Blackbody radiation Color

An ideal blackbody absorbs all incident radiation. Josef Stefan found that the intensity $R$ (power per unit area) radiated by an ideal blackbody is given by $$ R = \sigma T^4 $$ Q1) Since an ideal ...
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74 views

Rayleigh-Jeans Equation

According to my textbook, the power radiated of a small hole in a cavity (an ideal blackbody) is given by $$R = \frac{1}{4}cU$$ where $U$ is the total energy density per unit volume, $R$ is the ...
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Greenhouse gases

A post (below) on the Bishop Hill blog relating to climate change asserts that no warming effect can be attributed to $\mathrm{CO_2}$. I don't know whether the author is really a physicist but it ...
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107 views

How hot particles can get [duplicate]

One way in which an object is affected by temperature rise is that the wavelength of the radiation it emits is gets smaller and smaller. Another way of looking at it is that as an object gets hotter, ...
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103 views

Blackbody radiation through quantum mechanics perspective

While explaining black body radiation, the body is assumed as a cavity radiator and the radiations are due to the oscillating electrons. But we know that the electromagnetic radiation emitted is ...
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219 views

Why black body radiation is all over the frequency range

I was studying black body radiation and how quantization of energy solves the problem of ultraviolet catastrophe. But I have a very fundamental doubt. A black body can be assumed as a cavity with a ...
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514 views

How do objects heat up?

If every body emits radiation at a given frequency and temperature exactly as well as it absorbs the same radiation, how do objects heat up?
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283 views

Why do metal surfaces reflect thermal signature?

I recently borrowed a thermal camera from a friend and I tried to observe my palm print over a reflective metallic plate. When I looked at it through the camera, it reflected my thermal signature too. ...
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735 views

How does quantization solve UV catastrophe in black body radiation? What would happen if there was no Planck constant $h$?

Planck's Law is $$I(\nu,T)=\frac{8\pi\nu^3}{c^2}\cdot\frac{1}{e^{h\nu/kT}−1}$$ This solves the UV catastrophe. For higher frequencies, intensity goes to zero. It does so because of $e^\nu$ not ...
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How can blackbody radition be explained by quantization?

I don't understand why quantization makes a peak on the blackbody radiation curve (so there is no UV catastrophe) and the relationship between that peak and quantization concept. When the blackbody ...
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How can the black body radiation formula be so general?

In the derivation of the black body radiation formula, there is nothing whatsoever that relates to a particular/specific material. But we nonetheless use this formula for several distinct sources in ...
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How can it be that the sun emits more than a black body?

As far as I know, a black body is an ideal emitter. So how can it be that a non-ideal emitter emits more radiation than a black body? This happens only in a very limited area at around 500nm, but it ...
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How can a metal heated at 600° emit thermal photons at 4000°+?

Suppose we have a cube of metal inside a room at temperature 27°. If we heat the metal up to 600° using uniform radiation of that energy, no part of it should have higher T°, but nevertheless it will ...
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1answer
209 views

Maintaining local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) in radiating gas with a broad atomic transition line

Definitions / Background In LTE, Kirchoff's law for radiation holds: $$ \frac{j_{\nu}}{\alpha_{\nu}} = B_{\nu} (T) $$ where $j_{\nu}$ is the specific radiative emissivity, $\alpha_{\nu}$ is the ...
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How does quantization solve the ultraviolet catastrophe?

I understand how classical physics leads to the UV catastrophe. But I cannot understand how quantization solves it. How can quantization prevent the body from radiating a lot of energy? I know ...
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353 views

Does blackbody radiation work like this?

In a blackbody object the photons are reflected back and forward. If I heat up the the blackbody object with microwaves or other types of photons the electrons in the wall would vibrate. When the ...
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181 views

Physical reason why (hot) objects glow? [duplicate]

Every object at a non-zero temperature radiates light, i.e. it glows. (Is that called blackbody radiation?) What is the physical reason to this? Is it because more heat implies that the atoms ...
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How is temperature related to color?

I spent some time studying about temperatures and color of objects. It turns out that as we heat something it turns to red, then yellowish white and if we heat it more it turns to bluish-white. Like ...
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187 views

Examples to illustrate temperature dependant radiation by examples of temperature to color relation

I'm looking for a set of examples to illustrate the relation of temperature and color of "glowing" bodies. It should allow to build an intuitive understanding of this relation, so it's not about ...
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68 views

Frequency-averaged (gray) radiative transfer

The equation for radiative transfer is $$ \omega \cdot \nabla I = \kappa(B - I) $$ where $I$ is the intensity of radiation, $\omega$ is the ray direction, $\kappa$ the absorption coefficient, $B$ the ...
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Absorption cross section and absorption coefficient

What is the absorption cross section, how is it measured? How to convert it to the absorption coefficient (measured in cm$^{-1}$)?
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258 views

Absorption coefficient from HITEMP or HITRAN [closed]

How to calculate the absorption coefficient (for radiation) from HITEMP or HITRAN databases? Or where can I find some tables or plots for the absorption coefficient?
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60 views

Sun radiation in England

I used to live in Italy, and when it was sunny, well, as expected it was pretty hot. Both under the direct light of the sun through the atmosphere, and in the shade, where the temperature was of ...
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Question on luminosity of a radiant source and its dependence on temperature, and involvement of Doppler Effect

A few days ago, I happened to go through the chapters on Radiation, and Photometry, studying them at quite an elementary level. I studied Wien's displacement law, and the dependence of luminous flux ...
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How badly could someone be injured by concentrated sunlight?

Recently-ish, I stumbled across an interesting short story (by way of Science Fiction & Fantasy Stack Exchange) where a soccer referee is apparently incinerated by concentrated sunlight. Where ...
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193 views

What are the largest thermal gradients achievable in a lab environment?

I am looking for a system capable of creating a gradient of $100\, \mathrm{K}/\mathrm{\mu \textrm{m}}$ on a $30\, \mathrm{\mu}\textrm{m}$ spacing of a system mounted on a Si-N membrane. My so-called ...
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Why does my infrared thermometer say the sky is at -2 °C?

I just got myself an infrared thermometer. I wouldn't have been able to predict what temperature it would give me when pointing at the sky, but it turned out to be -2 °C the first time I measured, and ...
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7answers
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How does heat actually stay kept in the carbon molecules in the atmosphere? [duplicate]

We have all learned that the earth is getting heat up because of the CO2 and CO molecules absorbing heat. However, how is heat actually kept in those molecules. When photons heat them up, their ...
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If black and white object are in isolated space will the black absorb heat from the white?

This question has come to me from my friend in fact: he noted that the heating in the pub is painted black. I replied that it's better for heat emission. I don't know where did I know that from. And ...
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Can the hot combustion products from a large flame be in “non-local thermal equilibrium”

Question: Does it take some time for the hot combustion products from a flame to reach local thermodynamical equilibrium (i.e. for the energy state populations to follow the Boltzmann distribution)? ...
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122 views

Why do grey body radiators not heat up?

So I'm doing so work on the earth's climate system, and modelling it as a grey body radiators, and I've come across the phrase: "$62\%$ of the outgoing energy is lost to space and the other $32\%$ is ...
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Calculate temperature of the earth through blackbody radiation

I don't understand the solutions to a problem about blackbody radiation and was wondering if anybody could help me out. Here is the question: The sun can be considered as a blackbody radiation ...
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105 views

Does a surface in front of a radiator (not in contact) have a significant effect on the room's temperature or heating rate?

Does a surface in front of a radiator (not in contact) have a significant effect on the room's temperature or heating rate? Some time ago I had a discussion about it, and despite none of us knowing ...
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Black body radiation application [closed]

Does it make difference if you paint a wall black or white? If yes, how does it work? Thanks for reading!
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Excited Energy levels of Hydrogen vs Solids

My question has to do with Excited Energy Levels. I keep reading and learning that all objects/most solids emit infrared radiation. But to emit radiation, an object's particles must first enter a ...