The temperature-dependant emission of electromagnetic waves. Combine this tag with [tag:thermodynamics] for a macroscopic view or [tag:quantum-mechanics] for a microscopic explanation.

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Could airport security devices detect differences between printed and written documents?

If airport security scanners of any kind (xray, thermal, whatever else they use) looked at two items: A printed paper textbook The same printed paper textbook into which we have inserted a regular ...
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1answer
64 views

Black Body and Electron [closed]

My questions are: How does a black body absorb photons? Why does a black body absorb the most photons of all objects (e.g. those with another color)? Are there any relationship between the ...
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1answer
159 views

Physics and Skin Color: What differences do physicists observe between different skin colors?

I majored in social sciences, so I haven't taken a science class since 1999, so forgive me if I don't ask this right. What difference would skin color make from a physics perspective? Would there be ...
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1answer
42 views

Quantum Temperature?

I was thinking if temperature is proportional to the rate at which energy is transferred then does it exist on a quantum as well as a classical scale? If so what is it proportional to exactly?
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1answer
420 views

Thermal AdS and the Hawking Page phase transition

I have some difficulty understanding the concept of pure thermal radiation, as described in Hawking and Page's paper on the Hawking-Page phase transition. The four-dimensional thermal AdS solution ...
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3answers
176 views

Gas vs electric cooking

I've heard it said many times that you're more likely to burn food on an electric stove than a gas one, but I can't tell a difference. This seems to me to be a fallacy perpetuated by the natural gas ...
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3answers
84 views

Why do grey body radiators not heat up?

So I'm doing so work on the earth's climate system, and modelling it as a grey body radiators, and I've come across the phrase: "$62\%$ of the outgoing energy is lost to space and the other $32\%$ is ...
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0answers
42 views

Do COBE, WMAP, and Plack have design flaws? [duplicate]

MRI expert Pierre-Marie Robitaille on the design flaws of COBE, WMAP, & Planck and the violation Kirchhoff's Law: Here are his talks: Pierre-Marie Robitaille: The Cosmic Microwave Background ...
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2answers
1k views

Is frequency quantized in the black body spectrum?

I'm aware that there're some questions posted here with respect to this subject on this site, but I still want to make sure, is frequency quantized? Do very fine discontinuities exist in a continuous ...
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1answer
31 views

photoelectric cell

In the photoelectric cell my teacher says that the electron emission from the cathode depends on the frequency of the incident photon and it doesn't depend on the light intensity (I = nhU/ta , Right?) ...
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0answers
98 views

Black body radiation curve [closed]

In the black body radiation curve, why is the wavelength directly proportional with the intensity before the peak and inversely proportional after the peak.
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1answer
96 views

The origin of the colour of the sun

I have learned so many concepts under astrophysics and unfortunately, I have muddled everything together... Let me try to illustrate my problem: When a star is in main sequence, it fuses hydrogen to ...
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0answers
61 views

Radiation heat transfer

I'm looking at the radiosity equations for heat transfer http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radiosity_(heat_transfer)#Radiosity_method Specifically, I'm hesitant to accept the equation: $$ \dot Q_i = ...
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3answers
1k views

Why is the black body radiation so important?

In the derivation of the black-body radiation formula the assumption is made that the system is an electromagnetic cavity, so that it can be considered in thermal equilibrium. Leaving aside the fact ...
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2answers
71 views

Heating a black body

By definition, Black body has absotivity=emmisstivity=1. This means the black body radiates all energy it accepts. Does this mean the black body cant be heated?
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1answer
166 views

Examples to illustrate temperature dependant radiation by examples of temperature to color relation

I'm looking for a set of examples to illustrate the relation of temperature and color of "glowing" bodies. It should allow to build an intuitive understanding of this relation, so it's not about ...
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1answer
41 views

Excited Energy levels of Hydrogen vs Solids

My question has to do with Excited Energy Levels. I keep reading and learning that all objects/most solids emit infrared radiation. But to emit radiation, an object's particles must first enter a ...
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0answers
22 views

Radiation pressure at high temperature

I am reading a book on the history of the hydrogen bomb. The author describes the Teller-Ulam design and explains that the liquid deuterium charge was compressed by the radiation pressure generated by ...
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1answer
153 views

Blackbody radiation and Spectral Lines [duplicate]

Blackbody radiation is thermal radiation from a hot object emitted over a continuous range of wavelengths. But why are spectral lines, lines (i.e., you only get certain wavelengths when an element is ...
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2answers
211 views

Why don't the derivatives of the blackbody spectrum over frequency and wavelength match?

The question is: The radiation emitted by a black body can be represented either by the energy distribution over the wavelength or by that over the frequency. In the first case the maximum energy ...
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2answers
442 views

Light formed by the sun?

This is an extract from the astrophysics chapter in my book: Hydrogen atoms fuse to form helium. At the same time, lots of of gamma photons and neutrinos are produced. The photons take thousands ...
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1answer
110 views

Refrigerator cooling power usage

I have a refrigerator, that makes a lot of noise, and we have therefore set a time on it will limit the run time to when we are not at the office. But this is where our discussion begins, should we ...
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1answer
108 views

black body radiation graph [duplicate]

I got really confused about the graph of the relationship between wavelength and intensity of black body radiation. What does the peak stand for? And what does the graph tell us?How can we analyze it? ...
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2answers
201 views

Why doesn't diamond glow when hot?

In an answer to this SE question, the respondent explains that heating a perfect diamond will not cause it to glow with thermal blackbody radiation. I don't quite follow his explanation. I think it ...
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1answer
90 views

Radiation and absorption

Can thermal radiation from a cooler object (B, which emits longer wavelength radiation) ever ADD to the overall thermal energy level of a warmer object (A, which emits shorter wavelength radiation)? ...
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0answers
40 views

What would Planck's Radiation Law look like if there were only two modes of oscillation, $n = 0, 1$?

I have an idea that the law (since it's based on average energy, number of modes per volume, and a constant) would be shortened to something that would eliminate the summation terms in average energy. ...
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1answer
59 views

Quantum physics and black body

I'm a high school student, I just read something about black body. So I wanna know if I understand it correctly that black body is an ideal perfect absorber and emitter in sense that a normal object, ...
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2answers
245 views

Does blackbody radiation work like this?

In a blackbody object the photons are reflected back and forward. If I heat up the the blackbody object with microwaves or other types of photons the electrons in the wall would vibrate. When the ...
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2answers
176 views

Thermodynamics of thermometer

Mercury is used in thermometers because it increases in length significantly due to rise in temperature, However, mercury has high density relative to water, which means more inter-molecular forces ...
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1answer
236 views

How would a physicist measure temperature of molten metals in 1850-1920s?

How would a physicist measure temperature of molten metals in 1850-1920s? What equipment would be used?
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1answer
98 views

Photon number conservation during scattering

I was reading this writeup on the Kompaneets equation and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect. On page 3, section 2 the author states There is no way to increase the mean energy of a planckian ...
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3answers
4k views

Realistic calculation of heat loss for pipe

Good day everyone, I am new on this site and I hope to find here help, since I am not going anywhere with the literature I have found. I try to calculate realistically the heat loss of a hot, ...
3
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2answers
66 views

Temperature of relic radiation and thermal equilibrium

The temperature or relic radiation is 2.7 K. Does it mean that any flying body sufficiently far from any stars will reach this temperature? As I understand it, you can warm up water with sufficient ...
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1answer
79 views

Radiation pressure thermodynamic paradox

Could the radiation pressure of a black body (theoretically) perform work on the perfectly reflecting apparatus in the figure below? Assume that the block does not hinder the passage of light through ...
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3answers
134 views

Temperature of thermally isolated space region

If we thermally isolate a region in space, say using a hypothetical material of $0$ conductivity, and measure the region's temperature, will it be 2.7K?
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5answers
482 views

The strange thing about the maximum in Planck's law

I read that it makes a difference whether you calculate $\frac{dE(\lambda) }{d \lambda}=0$ or $\frac{dE(\omega)}{d \omega}=0$ in the sense that the maximum energy density with respect to the ...
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0answers
303 views

Radiative cooling time for a black body

Okay, so this is confusing me a bit. How can I calculate the time it takes to cool a perfect black body from an initial temperature $T$ down to equilibrium temperature (say, 3 K for space)? I know ...
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2answers
1k views

Planck's distribution and Bose-Einstein distribution?

If the application of the Bose-Einstein distribution is in blackbody radiation, then what is Planck's distribution? Are they same? How did Planck know that he should use a Bose-Einstein distribution ...
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1answer
298 views

What is “number degrees of freedom for frequency ν”. Frequency is 1D right?

The book QM Demystified states this about black body radiation spectrum: An attempt to explain these results using classical theory was codified in the Rayleigh-Jeans formula, which is an ...
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0answers
315 views

Does coffee with cream cool slower than black coffee?

At Modernist Cuisine, Nathan Myhrvold states that "Coffee with cream cools about 20% slower than black coffee". He then gives three reasons, two of them related to radiation and the third one to the ...
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1answer
581 views

How to derive Stefan constant from Planck's Blackbody radiation?

How to derive Stefan constant from Planck's Blackbody radiation? Consider the following expression relating to blackbody radiation: $$\phi(\lambda) d\lambda= E({\lambda}) \, ...
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3answers
3k views

All objects radiate energy, but we cannot see all objects in the dark. Why?

We claim that all objects radiate energy by virtue of their temperature and yet we cannot see all objects in the dark. Why not?
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2answers
79 views

Energy loss of Earth

How does the Earth lose the energy that it gains from the sun's radiation if it is surrounded by - and in contact with - nothing?
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3answers
2k views

Why is spectrum obtained by sunlight, said to be continuous?

My sir spoke about atomic spectra today. Sir said that, unlike the spectrum obtained by analyzing the sunlight, the spectra of atoms are not continuous. I got a doubt here, i,e even the sunlight ...
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1answer
148 views

Continous spectrum of black body radiation [duplicate]

I am wondering why black body emission spectrum is continous. Assuming only quantum effects that is electrones falling to less energetic orbitals it should be discrete. Is the continous part emerging ...
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1answer
345 views

Wien's Displacement Law for real bodies

It is known that for perfect blackbodies, $$\lambda T= c$$ where $\lambda= \text{peak wavelength}$ $T= \text{Absolute temperature}$ $c= \text{Wien's constant}$ ...
3
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1answer
492 views

Why do dark objects radiate thermal electromagnetic energy faster than light objects?

Kirchhoff's law of thermal radiation says that: For a body of any arbitrary material, emitting and absorbing thermal electromagnetic radiation at every wavelength in thermodynamic equilibrium, ...
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2answers
820 views

Does coffee cool faster than tap water?

A friend of mine, based on casual observation, believes that coffee will cool faster than ordinary hot tap water. Being curious about this I have tried to investigate it myself, but I'm not well ...
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1answer
334 views

Filament in a lightbulb, thermal radiation

I'm trying the following: The filament inside a 100 W lightbulb has an absorption coefficient of 0.25, and while operating, it is at a temperature of 2,573 K. What's the size of the surface of the ...
2
votes
1answer
581 views

How does heat energy travel in space?

How does the heat energy from the Sun reach us on the Earth? Since the kinetic energy of an atom is the amount of heat energy and there is no matter in space, how does heat from the Sun reach us?