The temperature-dependant emission of electromagnetic waves. Combine this tag with [tag:thermodynamics] for a macroscopic view or [tag:quantum-mechanics] for a microscopic explanation.

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Is thermal transfer in a vacuum proportional to temperature difference?

I would have thought that heat dissipation was proportional to temperature difference, especially in a vacuum. Is this true?
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Emissivity and Final Temperature of a Black and White object

Objects can be categorized as blackbodies (emissivity $\epsilon = 1$), grey bodies (emissivity $\epsilon < 1$) and white bodies (emissivity $\epsilon = 0$). If we placed two objects (identical ...
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Carnot Engine- Cold Reservoir is a black body [closed]

My question: A satellite powered by a Carnot engine uses heat from a nuclear reactor at a fixed temperature T0. Heat is released into outer space via thermal radiation emitted by a set of fins at ...
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1answer
45 views

Characteristic room-temperature photon energy - is this nomogram wrong?

Reading this recent ars technica article on the James Webb telescope, something kept bothering me about the nomogram - shown below. The credit says it is from The Opensource Handbook of Nanoscience ...
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1answer
33 views

Synthetic Photometry - Calculating a colour index

I have a theoretical black body spectrum, described by plancks law. I also ave the bandpass sensitivity function for various filters. I would like to calculate a colour index from this information, so ...
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1answer
426 views

Why 8–15 µm is considered “thermal infrared” if typical room temperature kT is 48 µm?

According to Wikipedia: Long-wavelength infrared (8–15 µm, 20–37 THz, 83–155 meV): The "thermal imaging" region, in which sensors can obtain a completely passive image of objects only slightly ...
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1answer
29 views

When thermal IR gets reflected from an object, does it change its wavelength (frequency)

I'm working with thermal infrared (IR) cameras to detect human thermal radiation. I notice I can easily distinguish non-human objects throughout the camera's field of view, though all are at same room ...
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61 views

Planck's law - energy, frequency and temperature dependancy

Unlike radio waves, thermal radiations are emitted at a broad range of frequencies. So, at a given temperature, an object might be emitting a lot of frequencies. Is that correct? So ehen Planck's ...
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The temperature of photon and its energy

Do photons have temperature? If not, does it mean that photon lose energy while travelling through space? As the planets farther away from the sun are comparatively cooler than the one that are ...
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Isothermal expansion of a cavity containing electromagnetic waves?

The cavity is perfectly reflecting , and simulates a black body . Is it that during an isothermal expansion of a cavity containing electromagnetic waves the internal energy density is constant and ...
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Physics 3 recommended book with solutions [duplicate]

I'm new to this forum and wanted to ask for a recommendation for a book which has these subjects with problems and solutions:(if this is not a valid question please tell me) -Intro to Waves -Fourier ...
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6answers
361 views

Is nature quantized?

I was reading Planck's postulate the other day on Wikipedia and couldn't help but noticing the sentence: "...is the postulate that the energy of oscillators in a black body is quantized..." ...
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2answers
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Why aren't the hottest stars mostly invisible due to radiating mostly in ultra-violet? [duplicate]

The hottest stars have surface temperatures in the range of 40,000K. Wolfram Alpha says that such a star acting as a black body should radiate almost no energy in the visible spectrum. Why then do ...
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In non-metallic solids w/ just atoms or ions (no molecules), are bonds (vibrations) and electronic transitions the sole cause of blackbody radiation?

Since there wouldn't be a conduction band filled with any electrons in a non-metallic solid made of just atoms or ions (no molecules), it's hard to imagine any other type of movement and dipole moment ...
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1answer
93 views

Help me solve a heat conduction/emission transfer problem. Mathematica has failed me

My problem: A thin-walled tube (length $L$, diameter $D$ and wall thickness $t \ll D$) is in a vacuum. It is held on one end (at $x=0$) by a heat source at constant temperature $T(0)=T_0$. The only ...
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3answers
38 views

Black Body Spectrum Plot

I'm Having trouble replicating the Black Body model for sun shown on this plot To my understanding I should only use Planck's formula: $$I(\lambda) = \frac{2\pi hc^2}{\lambda^5}\dfrac{1}{exp\left(\...
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4answers
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Is it possible to focus the radiation from a black body to make something hotter than that black body?

My previous question wasn't specific enough. I'll try to be more specific. Let's imagine we have a hot body let's say 6000K hot that emits lots of thermal radiation. Let's assume 1kW of radiative ...
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35 views

How to integrate to find the view factor of two parallel disks of different radii? [closed]

You have two parallel coaxial disks of different radii. I have tables that give me the value as $$F_{ij} = \tfrac{1}{2} [S - \sqrt{S^2 - 4(r_j/r_i)^2}]$$ where $$S = 1 + \frac{1 + R_j^2}{R_i^2}$$ ...
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Is this conceptualization of blackbody radiation logical/correct?

From what I understand, a blackbody is a body which does not emit radiation as a result of atomic excitation/relaxation but rather solely due to the kinetic energy of its particles due to interactions ...
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1answer
62 views

Why do metals have low emissivity values in general?

Is there any specific physical explanation behind this? I know from reading about emissivity that it depends upon surface roughness. So does metal with rough surface gets higher/lower emissivity?
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1answer
32 views

In solids, is it phonons, or is it the oscillations of electrons in bands, that emit most of the blackbody radiation?

In solids (most any object we see), which tends to emit most of the blackbody radiation: phonons (atomic, or molecular dipole, lattice vibrations) or oscillating electrons in their energy bands?
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Why would different metals glow red at different temperatures?

According to everything I've been taught about incandescence and black-body radiation, and some quick Googling to confirm I'm not crazy, just about everything, regardless of composition, should start ...
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Planck's Law in terms of wavelength

I am drawing a blank when it comes to equation transformation. Wikipedia gives two equations for the spectral radiance of black body: First as a function of frequency $\nu$: $$I(\nu, T) = \frac{2 h \...
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Blackbody radiation: hohlraum

Laser beams with a power of 10^13 W are focused through two small holes (0.8mm diameter) of a hohlraum (cylinder), and radiation can escape through them. To find the equivalent temperature of BB ...
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1answer
22 views

Estimating fraction of radiant energy absorbed by a metal

I have a couple of texts on thermodynamics and radiant energy but am finding it difficult to figure out from these how energy absorption and reflection work. The area of interest is heating ferrous ...
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21 views

Concentrating Blackbody Radiation onto Another Blackbody

Although I know many arguments against concentrating blackbody radiation to create a spot hotter than the blackbody, I encountered this confusing counter-example. Consider a thin sphere blackbody of ...
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Radiation Problem Based on Stephan's Law [closed]

A spherical black body of radius r is kept inside another spherical black body of radius 2r. The inner body is maintained at a temperature T. Find out the temperature of the outer black body
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1answer
75 views

Temperature from gamma rays?

I was reading about gamma ray bursts and read something along the lines of 1 MeV gamma rays corresponding to a fireball above 2 billion degrees Celsius. How do scientists get temperature from that? ...
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648 views

Black Body Golf Balls

The surface of a golf ball has about 35% more surface area (than a similar sphere) due to its dimples. So my question is simple, given identical radius, ideal black body material, and temperature: ...
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1answer
113 views

Thermal gravitational radiation and its detection

To my poor knowledge on the topic, the gravitational waves that are most likely to be detected by LIGO or other experiments do not have thermal spectrum. But I'm not certain. I know that Hawking's ...
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0answers
32 views

View factor of two parallel coaxial *rectangular* plates

I've found a lot of tables and resources that list view factors (VF) for various geometrical configurations, but I couldn't find a single one that has the VF for two parallel coaxial rectangular ...
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8answers
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What are the various physical mechanisms for energy transfer to the photon during blackbody emission?

By conservation of energy, the solid is left in a lower energy state following emission of a photon. Clearly absorption and emission balance at thermal equilibrium, however, thermodynamic equilibrium ...
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Why do moving particles emit thermal radiation?

While answering another question about heat in an atom, the discussion in the comments led to the question of how heat is related to thermal radiation picked up by infrared cameras. The answer is that ...
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1answer
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Dr. Pierre-Marie Robitaille: On the Validity of Kirchhoff's Law

Lately I've been researching about the black-body spectrum and the historical development of Planck's Law. I mainly wanted to understand a little bit more why many different objects (Stars, Hot Metals)...
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Please help me with this doubt from thermodynamics

My textbook says that net rate of heat transfer due to radiation is $\epsilon \sigma A(T^4-T_o^4)$ but i couldn't understand it. Rate of emission is $\epsilon \sigma A T^4$ and rate of absorption is $...
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4answers
176 views

Why do dark objects emit more than lighter ones?

For the purposes of this question, "lighter" and "darker" refer to the absorptive qualities of the objects. Darker objects absorb more light, and therefore appear darker. I'm trying to understand the ...
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1answer
50 views

Proving that Planck's Law is dimensionally homogeneous [closed]

I would like to know whether it is possible to show that Planck's Law is dimensionally homogeneous, as well as the steps taken to prove it. $$B_\lambda(\lambda, T) =\frac{2 hc^2}{\lambda^5}\frac{1}{ ...
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Express Planck's Law for blackbody radiation in terms of frequency [duplicate]

I'm having trouble with substituting $\lambda$ with frequency. The problem: Show that $$u(f)=\frac{8\pi f^2}{c^3} * \frac{hf}{e^{hf/kT}-1}$$ Where I'm at: $$\frac{8 \pi f^2}{c^3} * \frac{hf^3}{ce^...
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42 views

On Rayleigh-Jeans black body distribution derivation

When trying to derive the Rayleigh-Jeans distribution function, all authors say that in k-space each solution of the electromagnetic wave functions(of waves inside a cubic black body) represents an ...
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1answer
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Counting modes Rayleigh-Jeans

In the derivation of the Rayleigh-Jeans Law, we count the number of EM modes in a square cavity. After calculating the number of allowed modes due to boundary conditions, we multiply it by a factor of ...
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Radiation collapse to black hole

I want to find the temperature at which radiation in AdS will collapse to form a black hole. I have even found a reference that gives the answer but I cannot understand it: http://srv2.fis.puc.cl/~...
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0answers
50 views

Does nature really follow the heat equation?

I think the heat equation says that the first derivative of temperature with respect to time in a stationary solid varies as the negative of the second derivative of temperature with respect to ...
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2answers
129 views

Why does black-body radiation work for *everything*?

Everything not at absolute zero gives off infrared radiation, we are taught. Now I assume that doesn't apply to dark matter, and in general only to atoms as we are familiar with. An atom by itself ...
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0answers
76 views

Heat Losses to furnaces

I am looking in to the thermal efficiency of a furnace vessel. I am wanting to get a full, or at least better, understanding on the calculations needed to look at the thermal efficiency. So I know ...
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4answers
123 views

Why does a black body radiate in all the frequency spectrum?

I understand why a black body absorbs every frequency(it is the definition of a black body!) but i do not understand why it also radiates at all frequency spectrum.
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1answer
55 views

Blackbody radiation

In the blackbody radiation experiment, the inside of the body is metal so its considered a conductor inside, shouldn't the electric field be zero, so we would be left with only magnetic field instead ...
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What causes hot things to glow, and at what temperature?

I have an electric stove, and when I turn it on and turn off the lights, I notice the stove glowing. However, as I turn down the temperature, it eventually goes away completely. Is there a cut-off ...