Use this for questions relating to the proper use of physics terminology or nomenclature.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

10
votes
0answers
313 views

Gauge invariant but not gauge covariant regularization

I'm not sure if someone's already asked this before, but I was wondering, in field theory, when we say that a certain field is gauge invariant but not gauge covariant, what does this mean? In ...
7
votes
0answers
109 views

Mean Field Theory vs. Effective Field Theory

I am reading my many-body quantum physics textbook, and specifically the section on Mean field theory. It seems that the Mean field approximation in the Hamiltonian formalism must be equivalent to "...
6
votes
0answers
226 views

Physical interpretation: weighted eigenvalues of the Laplacian with a potential

I'm a mathematician with only the basic knowledge of Physics, so my question may be trivial: in this case, mercy me. :-) Let $\Omega \subseteq \mathbb{R}^N$ be a domain and let $V,m:\Omega \to \...
4
votes
0answers
96 views

Is the phrase “coupling constant” interchangable with “ strength of interactions”?

Can I use the terms coupling constant and strength of interactions, interchangeably, or are there more subtleties to the term coupling constant that I am not aware of? Coupling Constants from ...
3
votes
0answers
31 views

What is the name of the basis that uses objects of definite parity?

Currents to which gauge fields couple in four dimensions can be described as follows: $$ \mathcal{L} = -g A_\mu J^\mu. $$ Sometimes it useful to discuss these couplings in the chiral basis, $J_\text{...
3
votes
0answers
47 views

What is $\mathrm{U(1)}$ vector and axial?

In hadron physics we talked about $\mathrm{U(1)_V}$ (vector) and $\mathrm{U(1)_A}$ (axial) as well as $\mathrm{SU(3)_L}$ (left) and $\mathrm{SU(3)_R}$ (right). There are certain relations between them ...
3
votes
0answers
110 views

How can we count 17 particles in the standard model

This may be a bit of numerology, but I'd like to be able to make a statement like "There are 17 particles in the standard model" with some logical definition of a particle. But this statement is ...
3
votes
0answers
111 views

If the field concept was invented by Faraday, then how did Newton interpret the $g$?

This is Newton's law of universal gravitation. $F=G\frac{m_1.m_2}{r^2}$ Gravitational field $g$ is derived from this formula $g=G\frac{m_1}{r^2}$ This is named gravitational "field" strength. If ...
3
votes
0answers
53 views

What is the mean ionospheric height?

I am reading some articles about the ionosphere and I am a little bit confused about the terms mean ionospheric height and effective height of the ionosphere. Are these the same thing? I would ...
3
votes
0answers
110 views

What does the term 'a uniform RVB spin-liquid state' mean?

I encountered this term a uniform RVB spin-liquid state in some articles, for example, see the paragraph under Eq.(29) on page 9 in this paper. What does the word 'uniform ' mean? Simply from the ...
2
votes
0answers
32 views

What is the difference between selection efficiency and acceptance in high energy physics?

Often in papers the product of these two quantities is mentioned, but I'm not sure what exactly they mean separately. My guess would be that one of these is the fraction of the events that you are ...
2
votes
0answers
53 views

Terminology - optical (visual) properties of a structure

I am trying to understand few terminological problems that I encounter. Without knowing keywords it is hard to perform search for literature or publications in the area. The area relates to the ...
2
votes
0answers
65 views

QFT: What does “finiteness” mean?

As above: what is the definition of a QFT to be "finite"? That all UV corrections are finite and there are no divergences at all? That there are divergences, but these divergences can be absorbed ...
2
votes
0answers
38 views

Nomenclature of nuclear excited states

I read in an online portal about $^{112}$Sn nucleus making a transition from $0_{g.s}^{+} \rightarrow 2_{1}^{+}$ state. Also, some higher excited states were named as $0_{2}^{+}$, $3_{1}^{-}$, etc. ...
2
votes
0answers
190 views

What is a Fermi arc?

What is meant with a Fermi arc in the context of Weyl semimetals? Is this the just a one-dimensional Fermi surface? For example, in electron-doped graphene, the Fermi surface consists of 2 disjoint ...
2
votes
0answers
47 views

What does unfolding of attractor mean?

What does unfolding of attractor mean? Effect of time scales on the unfolding of neural attractors paper talks about Takens embedding theorum. It says that the embedding dimension should be large ...
2
votes
0answers
69 views

What is Jacobian about the “Jacobian Edge” in $E_\mathrm{T}$ distributions?

Particle physicists often talk of a "Jacobian Edge" in distributions, i.e. when looking at the $E_\mathrm{T}$ distribution of $W \to e \nu$ decays at rest. How is this related to the Jacobian ...
2
votes
0answers
168 views

Morphisms between chiral CFTs

This is a question about terminology. Given two vertex algebras $V_1$ and $V_2$ (= chiral CFTs), there are two kinds of maps $V_1\to V_2$ that one might want to consider. 1) Morphisms of VOAs that ...
2
votes
0answers
66 views

What is the 1/2 spin analog of the graviton called?

In some supergravities you have the gravition, gravitino, graviphoton and graviscalar. Each is analogous to each other in only sharing gravitational properties and nothing else. They differ by spin ...
2
votes
0answers
249 views

Why supra-conductivity became super-conductivity?

The original article by the Kamerlingh Onnes team in Leiden does not give a name to the new effect: Kamerlingh Onnes, H. Further experiments with liquid helium. C. On the change of electric ...
2
votes
0answers
129 views

How to name different approaches to relativistic quantum theory

In the introductory chapter of the QFT book by Mark Srednicki the author notes that [p. 26] So now we have two different approaches to relativistic quantum theory [...] Which [one of those two] we ...
2
votes
0answers
55 views

What name would you give to the method of approximating an arbitrary magnet with many smaller dipoles?

Let's say I had an arbitrarily shaped permanent magnet, with total magnetic moment $M_{0}$. Ways to calculate the magnetic field of this magnet include an analytic solution (if one exists), as well ...
2
votes
0answers
806 views

de Sitter and anti de Sitter metric

Is the following correct for the distance $d$ from the origin $(0,0)$ to point $(t,x)$ in the 2-dimensional de-Sitter and anti de-Sitter spaces? Here, $t$ is time and the distance may be called the ...
1
vote
0answers
26 views

Correct terminology or way to refer to the 2 “types” of ice sublimation

I'm trying to get the right terminology for various forms of phase change. I am familiar with the phase change / triple point diagram for water, and we have various terms for the transition of a ...
1
vote
0answers
53 views

Found a weird piece of lab equipment?

My physics teacher found a weird piece of equipment in his classroom that was dated to the 70's. The item in question has no identifying marker except for "Carolina Biological". He has contacted the ...
1
vote
0answers
18 views

Slowly Varying Functions for Adiabatic Invariants - The Same as Karamata's?

In section 49 (and 50) of Landau and Lifschitz's "Classical Mechanics", adiabatic invariants are discussed, which are related to functions which vary adiabatically or "slowly" with time. Admittedly ...
1
vote
0answers
36 views

What is the general definition of a quench?

I've seen the term "quench" used in many different contexts. It's easy to understand the meaning when the context has a simple physical analogue, such as lowering the temperature of a system to cause ...
1
vote
0answers
34 views

Non-local cosmology

Does anyone know what exactly non-local cosmology mean? Does it have anything to do with the scale we are dealing with or is it just the idea of objects interacting with each other despite having very ...
1
vote
0answers
41 views

Physical intuition on bivector in fluid dynamics

Reading the M. S. Howe's Theory of Vortex Sound I've ran into this exoression and equation: Let $v_A$ denote the fluid velocity at a point A at $x$. The velocity $v_B$ at a neighbouring point B at ...
1
vote
0answers
39 views

What does 'vector-like' mean?

What are properties of vector-like field/particle? What's the counterpart of it? Chiral like?
1
vote
0answers
41 views

Meaning of 'nuclear surface vibrations'?

Would like to know the meaning of nuclear surface vibrations as mentioned by Bohr in his paper titled 'The coupling of nuclear surface vibrations to the motion of individual nucleons'. The paper talks ...
1
vote
0answers
211 views

Instrumental function vs. instrumental line profile?

I am reading into spectroscopy and the terms instrumental function and instrumental line profile come up regularly. I have reason to believe that they are not equivalent but cannot find any clear ...
1
vote
0answers
49 views

What is the difference between Reissner-Nordstrom (RN) black hole and dyonic black hole?

A RN black hole is a black hole with electric charge, and a dyonic black hole with both electric charge and magnetic charge. My Questions: Is the above statement correct? Is the charges the unique ...
1
vote
0answers
65 views

What is crossover?

It is known that EW and QCD phase transitions in SM are so-called "crossovers". What is the difference between crossover and phase transition of the second kind?
1
vote
0answers
105 views

Dynamics and kinematics of quantum field theory

What is the difference between dynamics and kinematics of quantum field theory? I read that in QFT there is no possibility to keep the two things distinct because of a problem with the separability of ...
1
vote
0answers
71 views

Can anybody explain about phase shift and phase spectrum terms in case of multidimensional signal?

I know about phase of a 1D signal, but when I move into higher dimensions like 2D or 3D etc, it becomes headache to grasp the concept. What do the terms "phase shift" and "phase spectrum" mean in ...
1
vote
0answers
42 views

What is the correct terminology for a “symplectic covariant” equation?

A Lorentz covariant equation is one that takes the same form even when a Lorentz transformation is applied to each variable. Lorentz covariance is generally made manifest by writing the equation with ...
1
vote
0answers
48 views

How to get from $E_8 \rightarrow E_7 \rightarrow E_6 \rightarrow …$

I read in section 2 of this paper : "There is a well-defined chain to descent from $E_8$ to smaller groups by chopping off a node of the Dynkin diagram." What exactly is here referring to here?...
1
vote
0answers
194 views

What is the difference between mass defect and mass deficit?

Is there any difference between the mass defect and the mass deficit? I have read that the mass defect of a nuclide is never negative and have also been told that the mass defect is the same as the ...
1
vote
0answers
30 views

Frame dependence

I was reading an article about magnetospheres, and came across this quote: This supersonic ionized gas, or plasma, called the solar wind carries with it a magnetic field and a frame dependent ...
1
vote
0answers
81 views

Why are Lagrangian subspaces called 'Lagrangian'?

I am wondering what the special role of Lagrangian subspaces (or submanifolds) are in mechanics. Do these subspaces have some sort of special property for which we have some sort of `Lagrangian ...
1
vote
0answers
47 views

Since “coordinate time” has a very specific meaning, how to call more general parametrizations?

Recently I've learned that "coordinate time" assigned to a particular time-like spacetime path is not only required (1) to be monotonous and continuous and even differentiable wrt. the "proper time" ...
1
vote
0answers
68 views

What is the definition of a charge-neutral operator?

What is the definition of a charge-neutral operator? I guess it means something like: it is invariant under charge conjugation. It that correct?
1
vote
0answers
60 views

Have there been more distinctive names suggested for neutrino mass states $\nu_1, \nu_2, \nu_3$?

The different mass states of neutrinos are generally named $\nu_1, \nu_2, \nu_3$. By comparison, the names of quark mass states (up, ...
1
vote
0answers
90 views

Why are polymer representations called “polymer representations”?

Why are polymer representations called "polymer representations"? Polymer representations deal with non-continuous unitary representations of groups acting on nonseparable Hilbert spaces (see e.g. ...
1
vote
0answers
67 views

Trying to speak correctly of spacetime intervals and how to compare them

Is it correct to speak of "magnitude of a spacetime interval"? For instance, considering a pair of (distinct) events, $A$ and $B$, which are lightlike separated, is it correct to say that "the ...
1
vote
0answers
585 views

How is the term “Born level” usually defined?

How is the term "Born level" usually defined, e.g. in talking about the $pp\to Z/\gamma^*\to e^+e^-$ cross section at Born level?
1
vote
0answers
1k views

What is the relationship between Luminosity, Intensity, and Flux?

I am always confused by the terminology: In high energy particle scattering, and in particular, in the context of collider physics, what is the relationship between luminosity, intensity and flux? ...
1
vote
0answers
736 views

What is a boundary condition for capacitors/dielectrics?

I am extremely confused about what boundary conditions are. One minute ago I was solving easy capacitor questions and the next minute I am being asked boundary condition questions and there is no such ...
1
vote
0answers
257 views

What is the electric field part of an EM wave? Radiation field or the induction field?

Look at this image: I wonder if the electric field is from the induction field from a vibrating electron or the radiation field? If it is from the radiation field, as I suppose, than can someone ...