Use this for questions relating to the proper use of physics terminology or nomenclature.

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2answers
265 views

Equilibrium - uniform circular motion

Maybe this is a bit of a silly question, but let us pretend we have a pendulum in a ideal universe with no friction, drag, or anomalous forces there to affect it. Additionally, our pendulum is ...
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1answer
113 views

Can the phrase “Terminal Velocity” be used to describe non-gravity situations?

According to Wikipedia: [Terminal Velocity] is the velocity of the object when the sum of the drag force (Fd) and buoyancy equals the downward force of gravity (FG) acting on the object. Since ...
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1answer
187 views

Proper name for a thermodynamic process with constant internal energy $U$

Back in the day I learned that a few special thermodynamical processes have special names. For example, if one keeps $P$ constant, the process is called isobaric, if one keeps $T, V$ or $S$ ...
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1answer
24 views

What are degenerate transversal oscillation modes?

This is just a question about terminology that is used in the beginning of a chapter about phonons. In a simple cubic crystal, we can consider elastic oscillations in f.i. the [100] direction. In ...
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3answers
18k views

What is the difference between phase difference and path difference?

I have learnt that path difference is the difference between the distance travelled by two waves meeting at a point. If that is path difference,then how will one know what is phase difference and how ...
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1answer
39 views

Is there a term for the argument of the sine function outside of geometry?

Are there similar terms in other areas for the idea the "angle" conveys in geometry? I find that functions for abstract things such as pressure, electrical currents (nothing geometric there) on AC ...
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1answer
131 views

Magnitude of a photon?

I encountered the following sentence in my textbook, which I don't quite understand, and after an unfruitful google search, I still can't figure out what they mean by magnitude in this context: ...
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1answer
122 views

What is a long-tailed distribution for physicists?

What is the most common definition of long tailed distribution for physicists? I am looking for definition and examples. Examples should have arguments why the distribution is or is not long tailed. ...
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1answer
143 views

What's the difference between these two formulas and how are these called?

I just want to know the differences between these two formulas: $h = h_0 + v_0 t ± \frac{1}{2} g t^2$ and $y = y_0 + v_{0y} t + \frac{1}{2} g t^2$ Also, how are these called in English?
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1answer
231 views

What is the reference spectrum?

What is the reference spectrum? I need to know how to calculate the reference spectrum of a wavelength 500nm.
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1answer
269 views

What is the pause called at the apex of an object's trajectory?

My apologies for such a basic question--I am a musician, not a physicist. But I cannot anywhere find the word, if one exists, that describes that elegant pause of an object such as a ball, thrown ...
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1answer
488 views

What is the difference between observer, frame of reference, and gauge?

It seems to me that there is considerable relationship between the three concepts: frame of reference, observer, and gauge. How do they overlap? My current understanding is that an observer with a ...
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3answers
12k views

Difference b/w Kinetics & Kinematics w/concrete example

(I know whether I understand this or not doesn't matter much to my work & study but am just curious.) I still can't differentiate in my head kinetics and kinematics (similar thread is found but ...
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3answers
271 views

Is $f=ma$ an identity?

In his The Principles of Natural Knowledge, Alfred North Whitehead writes that famous $f=ma$ is an identity: It has been popular to define force as the product of mass and acceleration. The ...
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1answer
302 views

What's the difference between “measurement method” and “measurement procedure”? [closed]

The ISO VIM defines them as: measurement method: generic description of a logical organization of operations used in a measurement. measurement procedure: detailed description of a ...
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0answers
31 views

Why the viscosity $\mu$ is called “dynamic” viscosity? [closed]

In fluid mechanics we have the co-efficient of viscosity $\mu$. Why is the adjective "dynamic" added to it?
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1answer
28 views

De Donder Weyl theory

Im trying to get my head around what the difference is between a symplectic and multisymplectic manifold is. My understanding currently is that on a symplectic manifold time is the parameter that ...
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1answer
28 views

Simple explanation of Coherent integration radar

I have a physics background, and I'm reading some physics data analysis papers where they keep throwing around the term coherent integration. I've done the google search, but the best answer I could ...
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1answer
44 views

Vorticity versus Viscosity

For a work project I need to revive my aerodynamics knowledge again. Can somebody help me with the distinction between vorticity and viscosity. If a flow vorticity is not equal to zero, the flow is ...
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1answer
64 views

Graphene has a honeycomb lattice - true or false?

In my grand ignorance I would state that graphene has a honeycomb lattice. Some tend to agree with me and some others do not. I'm curious to know what members of the SE community think is the right ...
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1answer
25 views

What does “shortwave radiation” mean to a meteorologist?

I'm have an empirical model developed using surface observations of radiation (400-1100nm). I tend to think of this as visible, near infrared, and a little bit of shortwave infrared. I now need to ...
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2answers
53 views

What is the Planck quantity of an expression? [closed]

I don't know what a Planck quantity is (I tried google), but someone at school gave me this problem. As you know, I have no idea how to approach this due to the weird terminology. Find the Planck ...
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1answer
60 views

Buoyancy / Drag Problem

Buoyancy / Drag Problem Just a little bit of help would be nice. I have a spherical particle of radius $R$ and density $\rho$, surrounded in a fluid of density $\phi$ and viscosity $\eta$. I'm ...
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1answer
54 views

Name of battery voltage when load connected/disconnected

If I had a 3V battery, and when no load connected it reads 3.2V, and with a load 2.8V (just a hypothetical example), what is the name for these two terms, with a load or no load? I know the voltage ...
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0answers
17 views

Is there some other name used for “ping rigidity”?

In MTW, p. 398, "Box 16.4 (continued)", there's an interesting sketch (which can also be seen on p. 15 of this excerpt (www.pma.caltech.edu/~ph236/yr2008/readings/MTW_Chapter16.pdf). (It's not the ...
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0answers
75 views

Why is the $SO(4)$ symmetry of the Hydrogen atom called dynamical?

Why dynamical? My previous quantum mechanics teacher could not answer it.
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0answers
27 views

What are torque parameters?

Torque is just the turning force on an object, i.e the force multiplied by the perpendicular distance from the force to the pivot. But when torque parameters are mentioned in mechanical engineering ...
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0answers
22 views

What is Fermi energy and Fermi level? [duplicate]

What is meant by Fermi level and Fermi energy? And what is the difference between the two?
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0answers
59 views

Actions at a distance vs. contact interaction

The ancestors could not imagine an action at a distance (in German: "Fernwirkung"). Today physicists don't take serious its opposite anymore (in German: "Kontaktwechselwirkung"). So my first question ...
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1answer
69 views

Valley meaning explanation for foreigner

English is not my native language and I have some hard time translating this word. I was searching in couple dictionaries(both paper and online) and could not find it. Could anyone provide me ...
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0answers
53 views

Difference between RPA and generalized RPA

The random phase approximation (RPA) is an approximation method in condensed matter physics and in nuclear physics. What is the difference between RPA and generalized RPA?
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0answers
23 views

What is “thermal undulation” in the context of lipid bilayers?

What is thermal undulation in the context of lipid bilayers? Is it another word for "thermal fluctuation"?
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1answer
105 views

Single-channel vs multi-channel scattering

I am studying quantum scattering and stumbled upon the "scattering channel" and "single- and multi-channel scattering" terms. However, I didn't manage to find any sufficiently formal definitions of ...
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0answers
28 views

Is there a generic term for orbital groups such as $e_g$ and $t_{2g}$?

I am looking for a generic term for sets of atomic orbitals (viz. spherical harmonics) which are grouped by crystal symmetry. The most familiar examples would be $e_g$ and $t_{2g}$ (in cubic ...
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3answers
143 views

Meaning of invariable

Invariable means which is not variable i.e. can't be changed. Recently I have seen a sentence when reading a chapter based on measurement: The accepted standards must be accessible to those who ...
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0answers
25 views

Origin of the names for the decay chains

Is there any reason for the names of the decay chains? As shown in this chart (larger version here): only the Thorium chain starts on an isotope of the element it takes its name from, and it can ...
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0answers
35 views

Have there been more distinctive names suggested for neutrino mass states $\nu_1, \nu_2, \nu_3$?

The different mass states of neutrinos are generally named $\nu_1, \nu_2, \nu_3$. By comparison, the names of quark mass states (up, ...
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0answers
88 views

What does “define analytically” mean?

I'm trying to do my homework in physics but here I have found something that I am not understanding. It says: Define analytically the terms that should stationary flow accomplish. I know that ...
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0answers
61 views

Taylor approximation of e(v) [closed]

Relativistic mass $\displaystyle m(v)=\frac{m_o}{\sqrt{(1-(v/c)^2}}$ $m_o$ = mass of object measured at rest $c$ = speed of light ($3\times 10^8\;m/s$) $v$ = speed If the total relativistic energy ...
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0answers
184 views

What is the electric field part of an EM wave? Radiation field or the induction field?

Look at this image: I wonder if the electric field is from the induction field from a vibrating electron or the radiation field? If it is from the radiation field, as I suppose, than can someone ...
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1answer
172 views

Is reflection just a particular case of scattering?

I was talking to a colleague about optical scattering from a metallic nanoparticle, and we had a very simple doubt. If you have a particle that's small compared to the illuminated area, you can use ...
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1answer
48 views

Definition of “destructive” interference of waves

What is the commonly accepted precise definition of "destructive" interference of waves. Does it mean: interference with complete cancellation or interference where the amplitude gets smaller ...
-1
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2answers
81 views

Is fission reaction considered natural or artificial? [closed]

As I learned, nuclear fission doesn't occur without the control of a human made nuclear reactor, by hitting a neutron to a fissile isotope. Thus, the fission reaction is considedred as a part of ...
-1
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1answer
45 views

Angular displacement after full rotation

I was wondering is why angular displacement isn't $0$ after $n$ full rotations?
-1
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1answer
62 views

What does this notation mean? [duplicate]

Terminology question. Reading this, in the middle of the second page, when it says Left-handed quarks form 3 (3; 2; + 1 6 ) multiplets Qn (n = 1; 2; 3); What does this (3;2;+1/6) mean?
-1
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1answer
115 views

Looking for the name of a physical phenomenon in fluids' mechanics

I have not even an idea about how I would search for that on Google, that is why I'm trying my chance here. As electrical engineer I have no clue about fluid mechanics. We all now that when water is ...
-1
votes
1answer
258 views

Is a uniformly charged conducting plate the same as a uniformly charged conducting sheet?

Is it correct that a uniformly charged conducting plate is made up of two charged conducting sheets, that is, a charged conducting plate consists of four surfaces?
-1
votes
1answer
80 views

Relativistic momentum and mass [duplicate]

Is there even a relativistic mass or just relativistic momentum? How does one reason to prefer one over another? What is the problem with saying a hot gas will have more mass/inertia to it?
-1
votes
1answer
165 views

What is volume * mass be called? [closed]

I need a denotation for a rather unusual unit. $$ \frac{m}{V} $$ is called density. So what is $$ m \cdot V $$ called? Is there a denotation for it? I'd like to get a denotation that could somehow ...
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1answer
104 views

What is the name for the “nothing particle”? [closed]

What is the name for a particle with zero mass, zero charge, no strong force, no weak force and has no energy?