Use this for questions relating to the proper use of physics terminology or nomenclature.

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1answer
364 views

What is the origin of the naming convention for position functions?

In physics, position as a function of time is generally called d(t) or s(t). Using "d" is pretty intuitive, however I haven't ...
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2answers
228 views

Identifying hue, brightness and chroma of color and reaction time

If someone knows how identify hue, brightness, and chroma of color, please let me know. I am a PhD student at Educational Linguistics UNM.
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2answers
124 views

What is it called when a fluid will “jump” to grab onto an object that comes very close?

I'm doing an experiment where I bring a probe very close to a well full of fluid and then very slowly lower it to obtain some force deformation values. The material behaves very much like a fluid and ...
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3answers
2k views

What's the difference between “boundary value problems” and “initial value problems”?

Mathematically speaking, is there any essential difference between initial value problems and boundary value problems? The specification of the values of a function $f$ and the "velocities" ...
3
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1answer
665 views

What are Low-lying energy levels?

I am reading about some canonical transformations of the Hamiltonian (of a system consisting of an electron interacting with an ionic lattice) due to Tomanaga and Lee, Low and Pines. One of the ...
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1answer
220 views

What's a pseudo-rotation?

I'm sorry for this lexical, probably extremely elementary, question. But what is a pseudo-rotation? I just read this term for the first time, in the beginning of the 4th chapter book of CFT by Di ...
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1answer
96 views

Terminology question about energy

I'm looking for the appropriate term to use for what gets "used up" as potential energy is converted to heat and work. For example, some of the the energy in solar radiation is converted by ...
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1answer
285 views

How does one pronounce this particle's name?

How would you read the following particles' names in a conversation in English? I am looking for some "proper" way of doing it. Say, imagine you are reading a technical description in a semi-formal ...
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4answers
2k views

Work done by the Magnetic Force

The magnetic part of the Lorentz force acts perpendicular to the charge's velocity, and consequently does zero work on it. Can we extrapolate this statement to say that such a nature of the force ...
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3answers
229 views

Equation $H(q,p)=E$ is the equation of motion or energy-conservation law?

I do not completely understand, why do we consider Hamilton–Jacobi equation $H(q,p)=E$ as equation of motion, whereas it is looks like energy-conservation law?
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1answer
123 views

A terminological question about work and energy

Work is force applied over distance. Is it also reasonable to say that work is (the same thing as) the transfer of energy? When work is done, the equivalent energy is transferred. But if energy is ...
2
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1answer
282 views

Why is a gaussian fixed point called gaussian?

I know what a gaussian fixed point is, and I did read the wikipedia entry, but it wasn't helpful. It says because the probability distribution is gaussian, but what probability distribution?
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3answers
276 views

Is $f=ma$ an identity?

In his The Principles of Natural Knowledge, Alfred North Whitehead writes that famous $f=ma$ is an identity: It has been popular to define force as the product of mass and acceleration. The ...
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1answer
2k views

What is “Quantum Levitation”?

I just found this video Controlled Quantum Levitation on a WipeOut Track and I'm having a hard time finding the term "Quantum Levitation" used except in reference to the video. What is the proper ...
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2answers
199 views

What will happen if we use a speed greater than light speed and find a body'motion and energy relative to it?

In Einstein's papers, he used light speed as a reference speed. What if we use a greater finite speed and do the same calculations. Won't this greater speed then be the limit.
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1answer
652 views

Why are the quarks so named?

Quarks have a variety of names (or flavours): Up Down Strange Charm Bottom or Beauty Top or Truth Why do they have such odd names?
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2answers
567 views

What is a single word that describes the idea of the second time derivative of energy?

I think about position, its time derivative speed, and its second time derivative, acceleration. I would like to identify a single word that can be used as a handle for the second time derivative of ...
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1answer
194 views

Is reflection just a particular case of scattering?

I was talking to a colleague about optical scattering from a metallic nanoparticle, and we had a very simple doubt. If you have a particle that's small compared to the illuminated area, you can use ...
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1answer
3k views

Eigenfunctions v.s. eigenstates

Is there a difference between "eigenfunction" and "eigenstate"? They seem to be used interchangeably in texts, which is confusing. My guess is that an "eigenfunction" has an explicit ...
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1answer
168 views

Reality constraint

What is the "definition" of a reality constraint and why is it called that way? (I mean how it is used for example in quantum field theory and string theory)
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2answers
5k views

What's the difference between constitutive laws and governing equations?

I'm studying about the finite element method in a class but I don't come from a civil engineering background. Anyways, it hasn't been made clear to me what the difference between constitutive laws and ...
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1answer
150 views

Where can I find the equations for “quasi” elastic collisions?

Yes, you all talk about neutrinos and spins, but I came out with this basic s**t :D All of us learnt the basic equations of collisions, elastic (everything bounces and energy remains the same), or ...
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4answers
1k views

Basic question concerning pure energy

Inside the core of a star thermonuclear fusion reaction fuses hydrogen atom into helium releasing massive heat/light and energy.When a blackhole eats up enough stars and gases it devours itself by ...
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1answer
147 views

Name for phasor model of light

I'm looking for the name of the model of light "exploring" every path to a given point, and reaching that point with a probability proportional to the square of the resultant phasor's amplitude. (Yes, ...
3
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1answer
163 views

What does “single inclusive” mean exactly?

I thought I knew what single inclusive scattering was, but today when I went to look up a definition to check my memory, I couldn't find one. A Google search yielded no shortage of papers that use the ...
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1answer
264 views

Nomenclature of radial solutions to the Schrodinger Equation

For the free particle with quantum number $l=0$, the regular solution to the radial Schrodinger equation is $R_0 (\rho)=\frac{\sin{\rho}}{\rho}$ while the irregular solution is $R_0 ...
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3answers
603 views

Nomenclature: Yang-Mills theory vs Gauge theory

If you're writing about a theory with Yang-Mills/Gauge fields for an arbitrary reductive gauge group coupled to arbitrary matter fields in some representation, is it best to call it a Yang-Mills ...
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1answer
349 views

What's the difference between “measurement method” and “measurement procedure”? [closed]

The ISO VIM defines them as: measurement method: generic description of a logical organization of operations used in a measurement. measurement procedure: detailed description of a ...
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2answers
208 views

Nomenclature of hadronic resonances

I have the Particles Physics Booklet and I noticed that the resonances that decay into a nucleon and pion are indicated by an abbreviation. For example $P_{33}$ is associated to the $\Delta (1232)$ ...
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1answer
430 views

Metrology: What is precision for a measurement? [closed]

Is precision a "quality" of a measurement? Is there a better (accepted by the literature) word?
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1answer
731 views

What's a better phrase than “speed of light” for the universal spacetime speed constant? [closed]

The phrase "speed of light" is commonly used for the constant c =3E8 m/s, a feature that's "hardcoded" into the structure of spacetime. All massless waves and particles move at this speed, and it's a ...
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1answer
8k views

Is there a name for the derivative of current with respect to time, or the second derivative of charge with respect to time?

This measurement comes up a lot in my E&M class, in regards to inductance and inductors. Is there really no conventional term for this? If not, is there some historical reason for this omission? ...