Use this for questions relating to the proper use of physics terminology or nomenclature.

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1answer
203 views

Single-channel vs multi-channel scattering

I am studying quantum scattering and stumbled upon the "scattering channel" and "single- and multi-channel scattering" terms. However, I didn't manage to find any sufficiently formal definitions of ...
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34 views

Is there a generic term for orbital groups such as $e_g$ and $t_{2g}$?

I am looking for a generic term for sets of atomic orbitals (viz. spherical harmonics) which are grouped by crystal symmetry. The most familiar examples would be $e_g$ and $t_{2g}$ (in cubic ...
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0answers
25 views

Origin of the names for the decay chains

Is there any reason for the names of the decay chains? As shown in this chart (larger version here): only the Thorium chain starts on an isotope of the element it takes its name from, and it can ...
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0answers
36 views

Have there been more distinctive names suggested for neutrino mass states $\nu_1, \nu_2, \nu_3$?

The different mass states of neutrinos are generally named $\nu_1, \nu_2, \nu_3$. By comparison, the names of quark mass states (up, ...
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0answers
94 views

What does “define analytically” mean?

I'm trying to do my homework in physics but here I have found something that I am not understanding. It says: Define analytically the terms that should stationary flow accomplish. I know that ...
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0answers
61 views

Taylor approximation of e(v) [closed]

Relativistic mass $\displaystyle m(v)=\frac{m_o}{\sqrt{(1-(v/c)^2}}$ $m_o$ = mass of object measured at rest $c$ = speed of light ($3\times 10^8\;m/s$) $v$ = speed If the total relativistic energy ...
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0answers
211 views

What is the electric field part of an EM wave? Radiation field or the induction field?

Look at this image: I wonder if the electric field is from the induction field from a vibrating electron or the radiation field? If it is from the radiation field, as I suppose, than can someone ...
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1answer
185 views

Is reflection just a particular case of scattering?

I was talking to a colleague about optical scattering from a metallic nanoparticle, and we had a very simple doubt. If you have a particle that's small compared to the illuminated area, you can use ...
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1answer
81 views

Definition of “destructive” interference of waves

What is the commonly accepted precise definition of "destructive" interference of waves. Does it mean: interference with complete cancellation or interference where the amplitude gets smaller ...
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2answers
107 views

Is fission reaction considered natural or artificial? [closed]

As I learned, nuclear fission doesn't occur without the control of a human made nuclear reactor, by hitting a neutron to a fissile isotope. Thus, the fission reaction is considedred as a part of ...
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1answer
61 views

Is 'grapheme' a substance or a typo?

While reading Ref. 1 I came across the sentence Below we focus on the physics of ideal (single layer) grapheme. I did google search 'grapheme' but the results tended towards a completely ...
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3answers
91 views

What is meant by phase, phase difference, in (and out of) phase in wave terminology?

What is meant by phase, phase difference, in (and out of) phase in wave terminology? How do you get the relation $$y=A\sin(\omega t + \phi)?$$ Since the graph of sin function is identical to that of a ...
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3answers
343 views

Given the Wikipedia notion of “arc length”, how is its manifestly real “signed variant” to be called and denoted?

I am dissatisfied with the presentation (not to say "definition") of "arc length", in its "Generalization to (pseudo-)Riemannian manifolds", as given in Wikipedia. (Who isn't?. But I'll sketch it here ...
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1answer
68 views

What does this notation mean? [duplicate]

Terminology question. Reading this, in the middle of the second page, when it says Left-handed quarks form 3 (3; 2; + 1 6 ) multiplets Qn (n = 1; 2; 3); What does this (3;2;+1/6) mean?
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1answer
120 views

Looking for the name of a physical phenomenon in fluids' mechanics

I have not even an idea about how I would search for that on Google, that is why I'm trying my chance here. As electrical engineer I have no clue about fluid mechanics. We all now that when water is ...
-1
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1answer
274 views

Is a uniformly charged conducting plate the same as a uniformly charged conducting sheet?

Is it correct that a uniformly charged conducting plate is made up of two charged conducting sheets, that is, a charged conducting plate consists of four surfaces?
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0answers
14 views

What is Switch Contact Rating? [migrated]

If Contact Rating of switch is 5A 240V AC & 0.25A 240 DC, Then is this switch can be used for contact rating of 220V (+10, -15% voltage variation) AC & 127V (+10, -15% voltage variation)
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1answer
37 views

What does $\bar{x}_{\textrm{el}}$ represent?

In the context of centroids and moments, what do $\bar{x}_{\textrm{el}}$ and $\bar{y}_{\textrm{el}}$ represent? For example: $$\bar{x}L = \int \bar{x}_{\textrm{el}}dL$$ Some references that use ...
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1answer
96 views

Relativistic momentum and mass [duplicate]

Is there even a relativistic mass or just relativistic momentum? How does one reason to prefer one over another? What is the problem with saying a hot gas will have more mass/inertia to it?
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1answer
165 views

What is volume * mass be called? [closed]

I need a denotation for a rather unusual unit. $$ \frac{m}{V} $$ is called density. So what is $$ m \cdot V $$ called? Is there a denotation for it? I'd like to get a denotation that could somehow ...
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1answer
114 views

What is the name for the “nothing particle”? [closed]

What is the name for a particle with zero mass, zero charge, no strong force, no weak force and has no energy?
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1answer
57 views

What is a phrase for testing for a certain result? [closed]

Is there a word or phrase for when someone is testing for a certain result thereby skewing his findings?
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1answer
51 views

Angular displacement after full rotation

I was wondering is why angular displacement isn't $0$ after $n$ full rotations?
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1answer
2k views

Can I just ask what these pulleys-and-constant-lengths problems are called?

I am not sure if this question is appropriate for this section, but I just want to know what these type of questions are called and when do physics majors learn them? These problems have to do with ...
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2answers
52 views

What does the “UV” in “UV completion” stand for? [closed]

What does the "UV" in "UV completion" stand for? Also, I'm not sure which tags I should tag this question with.