Use this for questions relating to the proper use of physics terminology or nomenclature.

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Equivalent of the word “Attitude” for the other three DoFs

When discussing the physical state of a thing (e.g. a satellite), you can refer to its attitude state (which, to me, consists of its attitude and its derivatives/rates) and its.... non-attitude state ...
-7
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0answers
37 views

What is the content for 4th dimensional space? [on hold]

For 1 dimension content is length For 2nd dimension it is area For 3rd dimension it is volume similarly what is the term for 4th and higher dimensions? is there a specific term?
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0answers
21 views

Position, velocity, acceleration, jolt, and [duplicate]

I am familiar with the fact that $\displaystyle{\frac{dx}{dt}}=v$, $\displaystyle{\frac{dv}{dt} =a}$, and $\displaystyle{\frac{da}{dt}=J}$ where $J$ denotes the 'jolt', or jerk. Are further ...
3
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1answer
277 views

What is the meaning of “moment”?

What is the meaning of moment? I'm little confused about the word as there are some terms like moment of momentum, moment of mass, moment of force, etc. I want to know what exactly is meant by the ...
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2answers
272 views

What is meant by the term “completeness relation”

From my humble (physicist) mathematics training, I have a vague notion of what a Hilbert space actually is mathematically, i.e. an inner product space that is complete, with completeness in this sense ...
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1answer
31 views

What is the word describing the pairs: temperature and energy, chemical potential and particle number?

I keep forgetting the word describing the pairs of coupled quantities in stat. mech. e.g. inverse temperature $\beta$ and internal energy $E$ or chemical potential $\mu$ and particle number $N$. I ...
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1answer
17 views

Semiconductor nanostructure and heterostructure

What is the difference between compositional superlattice and doping superlattice?
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0answers
14 views

Inertial force of fluids [duplicate]

Reynold's number is the ratio of inertial force to viscous force.I also know the definition of inertial force.but where does a fluid get this force from?what are the factors responsible for this ...
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1answer
57 views

What is gate symmetry?

I just read this interesting interview with Frank Wilczek and he talks a couple of times about gate symmetry, without ever defining the term. This isn't a term I've come across, and google throws up ...
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1answer
39 views

Difference between sudden force and impulsive force? [duplicate]

What is the difference between a sudden force which continues to act on the body, and an impulsive force? What would be respective speeds of the body just after time= 0?
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0answers
33 views

What is the general definition of a quench?

I've seen the term "quench" used in many different contexts. It's easy to understand the meaning when the context has a simple physical analogue, such as lowering the temperature of a system to cause ...
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1answer
40 views

What is $bfr$ in this expression?

I am reading 'Fundamentals of Quantum Mechanics' by Sakir Erokoc and came across this expression in relation to transition probabilities: $$\vec p=e \langle \psi_b |bfr|\psi_a \rangle$$ Which can be ...
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0answers
23 views

Why are photonics fibers called band gap fiber?

Why are photonics fibers called band gap fibers? Do the photonic fibers guide light inside the band gap or outside? What creates the band structure?
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1answer
34 views

Symbol $p^{0}$ of particle [closed]

This is a very trivial question, but I cannot seem to find the answer anywhere in a textbook or the internet. My question is, what particle is represented by this symbol? $$p^{0}$$
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2answers
45 views

Definition of a ray?

The typical definition of a ray and the one that I was initially taught was that a ray was a line perpendicular to the wave front. However, when reading up on birefringence it seems as though there ...
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1answer
195 views

Regular solution vs irregular solution

My Quantum Mechanics textbook (John S. Townsend's A Modern Approach to Quantum Mechanics) mentions regular solutions and irregular solutions. It claims that regular solutions (at the origin) to the ...
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1answer
20 views

Bifundamental representations [closed]

Can someone give me explicit examples (in matrix form) of bifundamental representations? Illustrative would be for instance: a) SU(3) x SU(2) b) SO(4) x U(1) c) E6 x U(1) but other you may have ready ...
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0answers
34 views

Terminology for 'inferring the current state of a quantum system as it evolves and gets measured out of your control'

Suppose I hand you a quantum computer in an unknown state, but running a known program. You know the program and which part of the program is currently being executed. The program tells the computer ...
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1answer
35 views

Spectroscopy, interferometry and …?

Consider the case of a Michelson 'Interferometer', from what I have read: If you measure the output as a function of mirror separation that's interferometry. If you measure the output as a function ...
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4answers
138 views

“Randomness” versus “uncertainty”

Highly rated PhysicsSE contributor @CuriousOne regularly makes the following claim about quantum mechanics (e.g. here): There is no randomness in quantum mechanics, there is only uncertainty. I ...
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0answers
25 views

Ampere right hand screw rule or Maxwell screw rule is the more correct name of the right hand grip rule?

Wikipedia states ampere right hand screw rule Some textbooks state maxwell screw rule Which one is the more correct name in representing the (colloquial) Right hand grip rule?
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1answer
270 views

What's the difference between the diffeomorphism invariance and reparametrization invariance?

Can somebody tell me what's the difference between the diffeomorphism invariance and reparametrization invariance?
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1answer
39 views

Speed of light in vacuum in special relativity

In special relativity, the speed of visible light is defined as a constant. But visible light is only a small part of the electromagnetism field. So why?
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1answer
37 views

Physical meaning of Phase matching

Can anyone help me understand what exactly is meant by phase matching? I want to know whether momentum can be conserved only under phase matching condition or phase matching condition ensures momentum ...
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2answers
35 views

Difference between scattering and refraction?

I while back I learnt that when light is incident on a dipole the dipole will scatter the light, and when it is incident on a material of a different refractive index then the light refracts. From the ...
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0answers
40 views

Are there any symbols left? [closed]

I have looked through most of the symbols used in physics and math. It seems like there are none left in the alphabet and the greek alphabet. Are we screwed if we find a new constant? Edit: How do ...
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3answers
43 views

What are the units for tenths-of-a-millimeter?

I'm seeing all kinds of mixed representations for what is a SI unit that doesn't seem to be easily representable with the Latin prefixes. Generally I stick one of the nominal ones and scale my plots ...
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1answer
14 views

Does the Schottky Barrier only happen at Metal Semiconductor Interfaces?

Most references that I have come across refer to the Schottky Barrier in the setting of Metal and Semiconductor Interface. Would it be correct to use the term Schottky Barrier to refer to the mismatch ...
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0answers
18 views

Water maintains equal level in connected vessels. What is this property called? [closed]

How water maintains same level in connected tubes or vessels? Is this a specific property?
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2answers
3k views

Why is the cut off mass for massive stars 8 solar masses? Why can't it be 10-11 solar masses or so?

I know that stars having a mass greater than or equal to 8 solar masses are termed "massive stars". But why is the cut-off 8 solar masses?
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2answers
420 views

What is the difference between “additive” quantum numbers and “multiplicative” quantum numbers?

What is the difference between "additive" quantum numbers and "multiplicative" quantum numbers? I think that this may have something to do with P and C Symmetry groups, but I may be mistaken. I’m ...
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1answer
64 views

What is the difference between the Lorentz force and the ponderomotive force? [closed]

I understand that Lorentz force is due to motion of moving charged particle in a magnetic field, and I imagine that ponderomotive force is mechanical version analogy to a person surfing on a wave ...
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1answer
43 views

What is the meaning of 'physical gauge'?

What does it mean for a gauge to be a physical gauge in your gauge choice of the theory, and why is it called the "physical gauge"?
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1answer
100 views

What do we exactly mean by a “topological object” in physics?

I have been working on topological defects like monopoles, etc. for some time. One think that I have not been able to understand is the physical meaning of the phrase "topological object". I have ...
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2answers
420 views

What is “Dynamical phase transition”?

What is "Dynamical phase transition"? It is a fancy notion now. But what exactly does it mean? What is the difference between it and the conventional phase transition?
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2answers
42 views

Characteristic frequency

Can you please give me shortest possible (bare basic definition) of the characteristic frequency of a spectrum? All that google gives me are books and articles where I don't understand a word.
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2answers
48 views

What is localization length of eigenvectors?

Apology if this question is not appropriate. I was looking to associate entropy to eigenvectors for some of my work and I found the link http://chaos.if.uj.edu.pl/~karol/pdf/ZK94.pdf . This leads to ...
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1answer
17 views

What is the difference between 'Illumination' and 'Illuminance', if any?

What is the difference between 'Illumination' and 'Illuminance', if any? From my knowledge, both of them have the same unit, the lux. So are the two words used to refer to the same parameter or are ...
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0answers
20 views

Zeeman splitting of $xcm^{-1}$

I am working through some practice problems and one question says a for the ground state of hydrogen there is a Zeeman splitting of $x cm^{-1}$. There is no other helpful information in the question. ...
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33 views

Non-local cosmology

Does anyone know what exactly non-local cosmology mean? Does it have anything to do with the scale we are dealing with or is it just the idea of objects interacting with each other despite having very ...
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1answer
58 views

Uses of effective action and effective potential

Effective potential allows us to answer the question that whether there will be spontaneous symmetry breaking induced by quantum corrections. Is there any other information that can be extracted from ...
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1answer
41 views

What is the resistance force of a ramp?

I know that the effort force is what you exert on the object, the effort distance is the length you walk on the ramp, and the resistance distance is the height that I traveled (or height of the ramp), ...
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2answers
226 views

Differences between eigenstates, bound states and stationary states [closed]

I am not very clear about the differences between eigenstates, bound states and stationary states.
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1answer
37 views

Scientific definitions of “moment (of)” and “instant”? [closed]

What are the scientific definitions of "moment (of time)" and "instant"? Are they different with their definitions in everyday language? I also don't know the definitions in everyday language, of ...
0
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1answer
45 views

STU-model for Black holes

In string theory in the realm of black holes, what does the acronym STU stands for when we talk about the STU model?
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3answers
68 views

What is reactive power?

I am trying to understand what is reactive power. I have read that it has a relation with voltage, that is has a relation with the creation of a magnetic field in a motor, that it is coming and going ...
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0answers
45 views

What is the difference between the pressure and “pressure force”?

I am in the process of going through a question pertaining to inviscid flow over a cylinder. The velocity field is, in polar co-ordinates: $$\vec{u} = U_{\infty}(1 - (\frac{a}{r})^2\cos2\theta,- ...
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1answer
32 views

Why there are reduced properties?

In physics we frequently encounter with quantities that are 'reduced'. But why? Why there are reduced Planck constant, temperature, pressure etc?
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1answer
79 views

Quantum Gravity vs. Quantum Field Theory in Curved Space-time [closed]

I'm a freshman on Physics course, espite of this fact I have a quite interest on Gravitation. My question is: What is the difference between Quantum Gravity and QFT in curved space-time? The great ...
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1answer
60 views

What are some of the differences between (the fields of) quantum computation and quantum information theory? [closed]

I have just started self-learning quantum information theory, and have a sub-trivial question: what is the difference between that field of study and quantum computation? I have some understanding ...