1
vote
1answer
54 views

Proof that 4-potential exists from Gauss-Faraday field equation

This is a problem concerning covariant formulation of electromagnetism. Given $$\partial^{[\alpha} F^{\beta\gamma]}= 0 $$ how does one prove that $F$ can be obtained from a 4-potential $A$ such ...
3
votes
1answer
178 views

Proper time along path in Minkowski Space

Consider the path $x^\mu(u)$ in Minkowski space; such that: $$t = \frac{a}{c} \sinh(u) , \quad x = a \cosh(u) ,\quad y = 0 ,\quad z = 0 $$ where $a$ is a positive constant and $u$ is a parameter ...
2
votes
2answers
170 views

Recovering 4-vector Lorentz transformation from spinor formalism

I'm trying to recover the 4-vector transformation laws using spinors. I have defined $$v^{\dot{a}b} = v^{\nu} \sigma_{\nu}^{\dot{a}b}$$ as usual, with $\sigma_0=1$. Now with the rules for dotted ...
3
votes
2answers
256 views

The signature of the metric and the definition of the electromagnetic tensor

I've read the definition of the electromagnetic field tensor to be ...
1
vote
1answer
106 views

S. Weinberg, “The Quantum theory of fields: Foundations” (1995), Eq. 2.4.8

Unfortunately I'm struggling to understand how do we get eq. (2.4.8) from eq. (2.4.7), p. 60; namely how $(\Lambda \omega \Lambda^{-1} a)_\mu P^\mu$ is transformed into ...
4
votes
5answers
483 views

Why define four-vectors to be quantities that transform only like the position vector transforms?

A four-vector is defined to be a four component quantity $A^\nu$ which transforms under a Lorentz transformation as $A^{\mu'} = L_\nu^{\mu'} A^\nu$, where $L_\nu^{\mu'}$ is the Lorentz transformation ...
0
votes
3answers
385 views

Relativistic basic question - four vector, Lorentz matrix

I have heard relativistics only very compressed during my student time. Now I looked up the definitions again and a question comes into my mind: A contravariant vector is transformed like this: ...
2
votes
1answer
54 views

Testing covariance of an expression?

This is something I've been unsure of for a while but still don't quite get. How does one tell whether an expression (e.g. the Dirac equation) is covariant or not? I get it for a single tensor, but ...
1
vote
2answers
542 views

What kind of invariants are proper time and proper length?

Under the Lorentz transformations, quantities are classed as four-vectors, Lorentz scalars etc depending upon how their measurement in one coordinate system transforms as a measurement in another ...