It's the physical property that indicates the degree/intensity of heat present in a substance or an object. It can be expressed and measured according to various scales.

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Are Colors Emitted at Specific Temperatures?

There are quite a few nagging questions I have been having over the years, I do not require a full explanation, just some guidance in my assumptions and pointers if I am very wrong. My basic ...
3
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2answers
322 views

Why is the temperature zero in the ground state?

This is probably a simple question: I see this claims in many books, but I can't figure a reason why this is true. So my question is why this claim is true: "If we know that the system is in the ...
2
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3answers
498 views

What is the general statistical definition of temperature?

Temperature in an isolated system is defined as: $$\frac{1}{T} = -\frac{\partial{S(E,V,N)}}{\partial{E}} $$ But I wonder how one can generalize this to a random system. Or for instance to a point in ...
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1answer
207 views

Does brown but transparent swimming pool water heat significantly faster than western style highly chlorinated pools?

Eastern European swimming pools are often brown tinted water. i was told it was the color of the chemical to keep the pools clean, but who knows. These pools did not smell unsanitary and may have even ...
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2answers
85 views

What is the derivation for the exponential energy relation and where does it apply?

Very often when people state a relaxation time $\tau_\text{kin-kin}, \tau_\text{rot-kin}$,, etc. they think of a context where the energy relaxation goes as $\propto\text e^{-t/\tau}$. Related is an ...
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1answer
47 views

Speed of air through valve

Right now I'm working on a hot air balloon in Physics formulas. At the moment it's flying up like it should, but once it is at a certain height we want it to go back down. After some research about ...
6
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1answer
151 views

Reflectivity of a glowing-hot metal surface

When a polished piece of metal (or steel in particular) is heated to incandescence, how do its reflective properties change? Given a mirror-like surface, would the object temporarily cease to act ...
2
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1answer
192 views

Ginzburg-Landau model for superconductivity

Could someone kindly elaborate more on the Simple Interpretation section from this Wikipedia Article? I refer to the part on the natures of $\alpha , \beta$. Why can one assume that ...
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0answers
112 views

Calculate how hot PLA will become

I am trying to attach the shaft of a brass heating tip to a PLA component. My problem is that the tip will have to reach a temperature of about 200°C and the PLA can only handle a temperature of about ...
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1answer
61 views

Temperature of a small system

What is wrong if I define temperature of a small system (I mean, a system which has not a large number of particles) by $$1/T = dS/dE$$ ?
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1answer
104 views

Is there a naturally occuring sound pressure level reference?

There are lots of devices that purport to measure the absolute value of sound pressure levels. Here is an example, here's another, there's also this iPhone App. Putting such devices side-by-side in ...
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1answer
63 views

Heisenberg's uncertainty and $0 K$ temperature

when a body is subjected to $0 K$ temperature, it becomes rigid. hence if we see in terms of quantum the lattice vibration decreases, resulting in no change in the direction of the Random velocity, ...
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0answers
46 views

Negative temperature [duplicate]

How can we prove that if a negative-temperature system is in contact with a positive-temperature system, then the heat flow from the first to the second (and finally, the temperature of the second ...
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1answer
64 views

Is it physically meaningful to talk about the 'total temperature' of an object?

If I had a semi infinite, 1-D object and a finite 1-D object, both heated at the same constant rate at one end each for the same time period and both begin at the same initial temperature, is it ...
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2answers
877 views

How temperature gradient is a vector?

Everyone knows Temperature gradient is a vector quantity having direction from cold to hot.My confusion: why is temperature gradient vector if its direction is always fixed (as in the case of ...
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2answers
176 views

Heating and Recooling of an Object

Consider a piece of metal of length $L$ and linear thermal expansion coefficient $\alpha$. We eat the metal $\Delta T$ degrees, causing the metal to increase to length $$ L' = L + L \alpha \Delta T$$ ...
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1answer
1k views

Does gravity affects temperature reading of a mercury thermometer?

I remember when I was in primary school, the science teacher put me in charge of a mercury thermometer. I do not quite understand the mechanics behind except that mercury expands when it is hot and ...
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6answers
2k views

Why isn't temperature measured in Joules?

If we set the Boltzmann constant to $1$, then entropy would just be $\ln \Omega$, temperature would be measured in $\text{joules}$ ($\,\text{J}\,$), and average kinetic energy would be an integer ...
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2answers
146 views

How hot would space feel?

I read that the temperature of the space around the earth can vary greatly depending on whether or not it is in direct sunlight. Space, however, is not very dense, so I imagine that heat would not ...
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1answer
3k views

What are the temperatures of objects in Low Earth Orbit (LEO)?

What is the temperature of objects in Low Earth Orbit? Consider LEO to be 600km to 800km.
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5answers
8k views

How long can you survive 1 million degrees?

I asked my Dad this once when I was about 14, and he said that no matter how short the amount of time you were exposed to such a great temperature, you would surely die. The conversation went ...
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2answers
513 views

What's the avarage temperature of the Universe?

I'm sorry if this was asked before but with all the stars and dark matter and all the other stuff, curently in the Universe, what's the avarage temperature of the Universe? Is it like extremely high ...
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3answers
486 views

Could temperature have been defined as $-\partial S/\partial U$?

When coming up with a definition of temperature, it's typical to start with an empirical definition that a system with a hotter temperature tends to lose heat to a system with a colder temperature. ...
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6answers
2k views

How is gradient the maximum rate of change of a function?

Recently I read a book which described about gradient. It says $${\rm d}T~=~ \nabla T \cdot {\rm d}{\bf r},$$ and suddenly they concluded that $\nabla T$ is the maximum rate of change of $f(T)$ ...
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0answers
100 views

How to solve state parameters using these givens for an ideal gas?

In a thermodynamic turbine using air as an ideal gas, given that you have a known inlet temperature value $T_i$, a known exit pressure value $P_e$, a known inlet and exit velocity $V_i$ and $V_e$, a ...
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1answer
917 views

Does an object's color change its rate of cooling?

The motivation for this question comes directly from this thread. The proposition is that the color of something changes how fast it cools (note: specifically the rate of cooling, not taking into ...
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2answers
976 views

What is the physical or mathematical meaning of the Gibbs-Duhem equation?

The Gibbs-Duhem equation states $$0~=~SdT-VdP+\sum(N_i d\mu_i),$$ where $\mu$ is the chemical potential. Does it have any mathematical (about intensive parameters) or physical meaning?
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4answers
1k views

What does third law of thermodynamics tell us?

I just have a question concerning the third law of thermodynamics. The third law describes that the entropy should be a well defined constant if the system reaches the ground state which depends ...
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4answers
2k views

Why doesn't air freeze?

I am in no way experienced in the Physics field so this question may seem a bit silly but i'd appreciate an answer :) Why doesn't air freeze?
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1answer
153 views

Does the Kelvin have a rigorous definition?

From Wikipedia: The kelvin is defined as the fraction 1⁄273.16 of the thermodynamic temperature of the triple point of water. That presupposes that we can take a fraction of temperature. Now, ...
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1answer
106 views

Predict final temperature by taking temperature samples?

Is it possible to predict what the final temperature will be by taking temperature samples. For example, an object is 0ºC and moved to a room above 0ºC. I'm taking temperature of the object using a ...
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3answers
842 views

Is rate of temperature change constant?

Is the rate of change in temperature for an object constant? For example, from 0ºC to 25ºC, or from 25ºC to -10ºC? Does it take the same amount of time to increase temperature from 1º to 2º as 24º to ...
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3answers
2k views

Does sound propagate further in freezing weather?

A few days ago I went for a walk in the evening. We're having winter with a little snow and freezing temperatures. We're in a quiet, shallow valley with a train station about 1km from us. I heard a ...
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8answers
24k views

Will a hole cut into a metal disk expand or shrink when the disc is heated?

Suppose you take a metal disc and cut a small, circular hole in the center. When you heat the whole thing, will the hole's diameter increase or decrease? and why?
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1answer
219 views

Does electric potential have a temperature?

When I took my first thermo class a tucked away chapter introduced Exergy in terms of electrical energy, meaning that the amount of electrical energy you could get from something is functionally its ...
3
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2answers
816 views

With ideal gases, varying quantity of moles, and having a constant volume how do temperature and pressure behave?

I'm trying to build a simulation of gases so I ended-up trying to use law of ideal gases ($PV = nRT$). In my scenario: volume is constant ($V=1\rm{m}^3$); a known quantity of moles are being added ...
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3answers
383 views

Significance of letters in Hertzsprung-Russell (H-R) diagram

The Hertzsprung-Russell diagram that categorizes star types uses the letter codes O, B, A, F, G, K, and M to indicate a star's temperature/color. Hottest (blue) is O and coolest (red) is M. What do ...
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1answer
254 views

Why aren't two systems in thermal equilibrium the same as one system?

I am reading Molecular Driving Forces, 2nd ed., by Dill & Bromberg. On page 53, example 3.9, we consider why energy exchanges between two systems from the point of view of the 2nd law. We ...
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3answers
883 views

What does it take to derive the ideal gas law in themodynamics?

How can the ideal gas law be derived from the following assumptions/observations/postulates, and these only ? I'm able to measure pressure $P$ and volume $V$ for gases. I notices that if ...
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1answer
395 views

How to simulate temperature change of oven?

I am trying to write a software, which will model the oven temperature change when turning on/off. The data I can get is graph, by taking temperature reading each second from T0 time up to some ...
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0answers
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How can I read density fluctuation from microwaves?

The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation shows temperature differences. The red and yellow areas are warmer. The green and blue areas are cooler. For example consider this picture of CMBR ...
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2answers
174 views

How to get “real-time” temperature from sensor?

The following is LM35 Thermal response time in air The following is temperature reading from LM35 sensor. Horizontal axis is time in sec. So this is not "real-time" temperature graph. The ...
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6answers
2k views

What exactly is heat?

Is it energy? Is it energy per unit volume? Is it energy per unit time i.e power? What is it?
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3answers
296 views

Temperature and density

As temperature rise the density become lower,When temperature goes down, density is higher but in higher temperature the body become bigger so why density become lower?
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1answer
385 views

How can gas from compressed air can “take” heat from surrounding environment?

I have recently been reading about why a can of compressed air gets cold when the air it contains is discharged. From what I understand the change from a liquid to a gas requires energy and therefore ...
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2answers
1k views

How does a vacuum oven work?

I am doing some research on vacuum oven, but I cannot find out any website/book to tell me the theory. To my knowledge, it works better than regular oven. However, I have no idea why it is. Please ...
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1answer
1k views

Why does the monitor make a cracking noise?

After switching off the monitor, there's a single crack after a while. I wonder where exactly it comes from. I know that this is normal and not an indicator of being defect. This sound is also not ...
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1answer
94 views

Freeze and “break apart” an object. How?

Is it possible to freeze an object, say an apple, and then drop it so that is will break apart into pieces? And if so, how can it be achieved?
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1answer
522 views

Limit of Fermi-Dirac distribution as $T$ goes to zero

Hopefully this is a simple question, I just can't seem to get my mind around it. I'm to take the limit of the Fermi-Dirac distribution for $T \rightarrow 0$. In this limit the chemical potential is ...
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2answers
505 views

How to interpret Stefan-Boltzmann's law?

The Stefan-Boltzmann equation states $e=\sigma T^4$, but how do we interpret this? Is this completely wrong: A body of size $s^2$ generates the radiation/temperature $T^4$ for a given size and a ...