It's the physical property that indicates the degree/intensity of heat present in a substance or an object. It can be expressed and measured according to various scales.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

1
vote
3answers
110 views

Can a single particle be “heated” by radiation?

From the point of view of statistical thermodynamics, a single particle doesn't have a phase (state of matter), nor temperature. What would happen if heat is transported to this single particle via ...
2
votes
1answer
41 views

why there is no temperature and density in the formula of the electrical resistance?

Why there is no temperature and density in the formula of the electrical resistance? We all know, that the electrical resistance depends on length, temperature, density( material). Why is the ...
2
votes
2answers
151 views

Why does heat added to a system cause an increase in entropy that is independent of the amount of particles in the system?

Say we have two gas containers of $N_{2}$ at the same temperature of $300 ~\text{K}$, one containing $10^{23}$ particles and the other containing $10^{13}$ particles. If we add a quantity of heat to ...
1
vote
1answer
82 views

Mercury-in-glass thermometer

Question from my textbook: Jason says 'The mercury in the thermometer can be replaced by coloured water. The thermometer will function well after recalibrating using a similar method to calibrating a ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

Are atoms more attracted to each other when you raise or lower the the temperature? [closed]

Are atoms more attracted to each other when you raise or lower the temperature?
0
votes
2answers
70 views

temperature from a molecular point of view

The electric fan increases the velocity and hence the kinetic energy of the molecules in the air. this would mean that the temperature has increased. What's wrong with a conclusion? I want you to ...
0
votes
0answers
26 views

How long does it take for space dust to stop irradiating energy?

I heard that space dust is detectable because it irradiates on the infrared part of the spectrum? Does this happen forever? Won't it stop after some millions of years? Does it have to irradiate until ...
1
vote
1answer
191 views

What is the temperature of the event horizon?

In a discussion with my son about absolute zero, we arrived at the conclusion that the event horizon might be the place to look, as it "absorbs?" all energy, including light. Found this in the ...
0
votes
1answer
64 views

What is the difference between temperature difference and temperature change?

In a course of mathematical modelling that I am taking, there is a great confusion between the concepts of temperature change due to a unit heat input at some position $x$ and time $t$, and the ...
0
votes
1answer
68 views

Will the heat flow rate be same when temperature difference is not same?

If I give heat with a certain source will the change of temperature difference change the heat flow rate? Suppose I have a aluminium rod which has a weight of 25 gram. I heated it up to 40 degree ...
1
vote
1answer
61 views

Heating 2 sets of 1L water vs 1 set of 2L water [closed]

Can heating 2 sets of 1L water or 1 set of 2L water have a variation in terms of fuel efficiency? Can one be more fuel-efficient than the other? (migrated from chemistry site)
-2
votes
1answer
77 views

How to calculate the increase in temperature due to drop? [closed]

Question- Calculate the rise in temperature in celcius in a bucket of water after it is dropped from 50 m where acceleration due to gravity is 10. I know that I need to find the amount of energy ...
1
vote
2answers
260 views

How much energy would be required to make one tea cup full of Earl Gray tea at 100F?

On the TV show "Star Trek: The Next Generation", Captain Picard is often pictured using a replicator to materialize a cup of "Earl Gray tea, hot". Besides wondering what they do with all the empty ...
1
vote
1answer
45 views

Method used to prove emissive power, $E \propto T^4$

Stefan's Law states that emissive power($E$) of a black body is proportional to $T^4$. But how did Stefan arrive at the conclusion? I mean, it is not possible currently to get a perfectly black body, ...
0
votes
1answer
91 views

How does a photon raise the temperature of a gas?

The temperature of a fixed volume of a gas is increased when it interacts with radiation. Why does the temperature increase (i.e. why does the velocity of a gas molecule increase) when a photon is ...
1
vote
2answers
64 views

Thermodynamic expectation value at $T=0$

The thermodynamic expectation value for an observable $A$ is defined as $$\langle A \rangle = \frac{1}{Z} \sum_n \langle\psi_n| e^{-\beta H} A|\psi_n \rangle, \qquad (1)$$ where $\beta=1/k_bT$, the $\...
2
votes
1answer
70 views

Temperature of a trapped particle

How is the temperature of the center of mass of a trapped particle (e.g. in a Paul or Penning trap with laser cooling) defined? I assume it has something to do with the equipartition theorem and ...
0
votes
1answer
23 views

Temperature moderation

Temperature moderation is closely related to the hydrogen bond, as you guys all know. And this temperature moderation happens everyday to human beings through perspiration. As the water in you body ...
1
vote
0answers
49 views

WIll aluminium foil get hot in microoven if I wrap it with paper?

A aluminium foil doesn't get hot easily because of it's heat conductivity. Will it get hot in microwave oven if I wrap it with paper?
1
vote
0answers
15 views

Sliding Wine Glass [duplicate]

Earlier today, I came across a strange phenomenon involving a just-washed wine glass and a countertop. The gist of it is: when you place a warm wine glass upside-down on the wet countertop, it starts ...
2
votes
3answers
143 views

The temperature in space is about 3K, however there are almost no atoms in space. How can there be residual heat?

My understanding is that heat is essentially atomic vibrations. If there are almost no atoms, how can there be residual heat? Also, as I understand in space there is no heat transfer via convection ...
-1
votes
2answers
74 views

What is the physical explanation for the heat equation?

We know that $\int{\vec v.\vec n \,\ d a}$=$\int{\nabla^2(u)\,\ dx \,\ dy \,\ dz}$ where $\vec v$ is the velocity of the heat flow and $u(x,y,z)$ is the temperature at the point $(x,y,z)$.and $ \vec v=...
0
votes
1answer
43 views

Does shaking a carbonated soda warm it up?

I had an odd situation where i left a soda near the fridge exhaust and it developed some ice crystals (i could hear it sloshing). When i took it out i instinctively shook up the closed soda can with ...
4
votes
1answer
204 views

Temperature in the Hamiltonian limit

There is a well known connection between statistical mechanics in D spatial dimensions and quantum field theory in D-1 spatial dimensions. Changing the temperature in statistical mechanics corresponds ...
2
votes
2answers
286 views

Specific heat capacity and temperature, 0 K?

I've found similar threads like this, but with no clear answer. I understand that the specific heat capacity of a substance increases with temperature, because the vibrational nodes and rotational ...
-1
votes
1answer
118 views

Will I weigh more if I have fever?

$E=mc^2$ means that energy is mass, and adding energy to an object (that is, making it hotter) makes it more massive. So if my body temperature increases, will I weigh more? or will i become lighter ...
4
votes
2answers
181 views

At what wind speed does wind chill's conductive cooling exactly cancel out the compressive heating of the air?

At relatively slow wind speeds such as 15mph, wind chill drains heat from an object as it flows past, and this conductive cooling effect seems to increase as the wind speed increases. However, at very ...
1
vote
1answer
146 views

Do solids have translational energy?

Along with having vibrational energy, do both crystalline and amorphous solids also have translational energy? I ask because I've always understood solids to have just vibrational motion/energy. But ...
0
votes
1answer
75 views

Why does the stiffness of organic polymers (plastic) change so much with small changes in temperature?

This is on the borderline between Physics and Chemistry, but I would like a Physics perspective. I am guessing that plastics are a glass-like phase, rather than a true solid.
1
vote
1answer
40 views

Why is metal stiffer at lower temperatures?

Each morning I cycle to school and lock my bike with a thick steel wire (about 8 mm thick). I noticed that it's much harder to change the shape of the wire in the morning when it's much colder than ...
0
votes
2answers
88 views

Can Maxwell's law of distribution of velocities be used to determine a value for absolute heat?

I'm currently reading about Maxwell's law of distribution of velocities, and the thought occurred to me that I could use this to calculate the maximum temperature that an atom could reach. My theory ...
0
votes
1answer
23 views

How does an object in vacuum loose its temperature? [duplicate]

Well, it radiates in the infrared, I guess. But how exactly are these photons created? The atoms have some kinetic energy, which makes up the temperature. So while the atoms or molecules jitter a bit ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

What's the difference between a positive and a negative current?

Say I have a wire, and I connect a current source on its left end, and a ground to its right end. Then using my power supply I source a positive current, does this mean that electrons will move from ...
3
votes
2answers
209 views

Temperature of a falling meteor

I am reading "What if?" article https://what-if.xkcd.com/20/ and I'm interested in it's scientific background. Mr. Munroe writes: As it [the meteor] falls, it compresses the air in front of it. ...
-3
votes
1answer
47 views

Need Some Help Creating A Couple Of Equations [duplicate]

I've posted about this project before as math is not at all my strong subject anymore. I have a couple sets of data and I need to make some equations for them. I've used Excel to get trend lines, but ...
0
votes
1answer
99 views

Quicker way to cool liquid

I need to prepare a bottle of baby milk from formula quickly. To prepare it I must use some boiling water to sterilise the powder however it must be served at just above room temperature for the baby ...
2
votes
2answers
87 views

Temperature rise in Thermosphere

Generally speaking, temperature decreases as altitude increases from the sea level. But at the ozone layer it increases because ozone absorbs UV radiation. Temperature increases again in Thermosphere. ...
5
votes
5answers
189 views

What would the RBG color value of an infinitely hot blackbody be?

In other words, what is the limit of the rgb values of color temperature as temperature approaches infinity? Put differently, what is the terminal point of the Planckian locus? Is there an exact value?...
0
votes
0answers
99 views

Is temperature a frame dependent quantity? [duplicate]

The temperature of an object is proportional to the average kinetic energy (1/2*m*v^2) of its particles (or molecules), then shouldn't the temperature depend on the frame of reference since v^2 will ...
6
votes
3answers
2k views

Can two bodies having the same internal energy have different temperatures?

According to me, two objects having the same internal energy may have different temperatures if their masses and specific heats are different and it is possible that an object with more internal ...
4
votes
3answers
1k views

Why is boiling not just a surface phenomenon?

The boiling point of a liquid is defined as The temperature at which the vapor pressure of the liquid is equal to the external atmospheric pressure. That being the case, why, in a pot of boiling ...
0
votes
1answer
49 views

sudden volume increase piston

I am wondering what happens in the following situation. I have a piston filled with an ideal gas for which I suddenly/instantaneaouly iscrease the volume. In particular I want to know what happens to ...
2
votes
1answer
458 views

Why can we hear sound better on the water than on land?

If we sit in a boat on a lake we can often hear people talking on the shore clearly in contrast to sitting in an empty field and hearing the people talk over the same distance. I heard that this ...
0
votes
1answer
54 views

Do ice balls in whiskey really make sense?

So, I get the ad copy, the surface area to mass ratio results in more cooling, less dilution. But does this actually make sense? Yes, total cooling is related to the mass/temp of the ice, not the ...
-7
votes
2answers
4k views

Can jet fuel melt steel beams? [closed]

Common sense suggests that steel beams should not yield under burning jet fuel without presence of other substances that produce very high temperatures when burning, such as thermite. So can jet fuel ...
1
vote
1answer
222 views

About thermodynamic beta

First of all, I'm not majoring this part and just finding some answer about Arrhenius rate equation: $$ v \propto \exp\left(-\frac{E_a}{kT}\right) .$$ To derive this relation, I started with Maxwell-...
0
votes
1answer
173 views

How to calculate water temperature from a room temperature? [closed]

e.g. My room temperature is about 33 degree celsius How can I calculate water temperature in the tank in my bathroom? Note that my tank is one side open up and it build up from bricks
2
votes
3answers
226 views

A physical explanation for negative kelvin temperatures

Just to get the thoughts rolling... Consider a two state system with discrete energy levels $E_1$ and $E_2$ where $E_2 > E_1$ which contains $N$ particles. We can easily deduce that the state of ...
0
votes
0answers
49 views

Equilibrium temperature of the universe [duplicate]

At what temperature will the universe eventually equilibrate?
0
votes
0answers
63 views

Entropy definitions

So I have learned that entropy is the measure of disorder of a system. For the IPhO this was of course not enough as we need to be able to calculate entropy changes of ideal gases. Those equations ...