It's the physical property that indicates the degree/intensity of heat present in a substance or an object. It can be expressed and measured according to various scales.

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How hot can plasma get?

I remember reading about an experiment where fine rods of tungsten were super-heated with millions of amps of electricity, melting them into ionised gas and were then compressed (by magnetic fields?) ...
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37 views

unit conversion issue

I have the following equation where $ T_0(x) $ measures the temperature in Celsius at point x. The parameter values are as follows. My question is how to handle the second term $Q_m \over ...
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1answer
36 views

Equilibrium temperature of closed system

Body X of temperature 0° C is brought into thermal contact with body Y of temperature 100° C. X has specific heat capacity higher than of Y. The masses of X and Y are equal. By my reasoning, the ...
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1answer
56 views

Temperature of system in canonical ensemble

Upon reading Reif's explanations relating to systems exchanging energy and the canonical ensemble (Reif, Fundamentals of statistical and thermal physics, p. 95ff and p. 202ff), I am led to conclude ...
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1answer
174 views

Is there any metal or any material that can survive the Sun? [closed]

If we were to send a unmanned spaceship through the Sun. What material can survive?
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1answer
109 views

Methane under pressure [closed]

A tank is filled with liquid methane. Then it is closed. It sits in an infinite room at STP (standard temperature and pressure). (Initial temperature is not important; assume density of liquid ...
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1answer
64 views

Time to decrease water temperature by 5F from different initial temperatures

Is the time to (naturally) decrease temperature of water by 5 degrees the same, regardless of the initial temperature? Imagine 3 glasses of water (a, b c) in a room temperature of 70F. There are 3 ...
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1answer
89 views

Electrons and photons at absolute zero?

I know that molecules can't move at absolute zero (hypothetically of course). But what happens to electrons and photons?
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1answer
32 views

Resistance including temperature - tungsten

I am doing a paper on calculating temperatures of tungsten filament inside a halogen lamp. I have measured different voltage-current levels and calculated the resistance. Then, I have used formula ...
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3k views

Why does an infrared thermometer display very low temperature when being directed to the outer air?

I'm toying with an infrared thermometer - one which you point onto an object, press the button and it instantly measures the temperature by estimating the infrared radiation from the object. It shows ...
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8answers
143 views

Visualising gas temperature and gas pressure

Gas pressure is created when gas molecules collide with the wall of the container creating a force. Gas temperature is a measure of how fast the molecules are moving / vibrating. However, they both ...
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2answers
826 views

Why isn't the Earth's core temperature the average of its surface temperatures?

Assuming that the earth is spherical, that its temperature is continuous, and that some other more or less realistic conditions hold, we might think that the Earth's core temperature should be about ...
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0answers
37 views

Thermal AdS3 in Chern Simons

I am currently working with (2+1) gravity in Chern-Simons formulation and I have a question about thermal AdS. The way I understand that one retrieves thermal AdS is by Wick rotation and ...
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3answers
107 views

Can a single particle be “heated” by radiation?

From the point of view of statistical thermodynamics, a single particle doesn't have a phase (state of matter), nor temperature. What would happen if heat is transported to this single particle via ...
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1answer
159 views

What is the significance of the Debye temperature from a materials perspctive?

If I look at a table of different metals and their Debye temperatures, what does the variation in these temperatures tell me about these materials?
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2answers
172 views

Temperature of a falling meteor

I am reading "What if?" article https://what-if.xkcd.com/20/ and I'm interested in it's scientific background. Mr. Munroe writes: As it [the meteor] falls, it compresses the air in front of it. ...
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4answers
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Is temperature a Lorentz invariant in relativity?

If an observer starts moving at relativistic speeds will he observe the temperature of objects to change as compared to their rest temperatures? Suppose the rest temperature measured is $T$ and the ...
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2answers
126 views

Why don't objects radiate off all of their heat energy?

Imagine a solid box in deep space. Solids are as far as I know constructed by positive nuclei in some sort of coherent structure, with electrons orbiting nearby too. Both the nuclei and the ...
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2answers
110 views

Would an ideal gas be colder at higher altitude due to gravity?

Since gas molecules are affected by gravity, wouldn't that make gas molecules at higher than average elevation slower (at the top of their ballistic parabola) and thus colder than air molecules ...
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1answer
41 views

why there is no temperature and density in the formula of the electrical resistance?

Why there is no temperature and density in the formula of the electrical resistance? We all know, that the electrical resistance depends on length, temperature, density( material). Why is the ...
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2answers
133 views

Why does heat added to a system cause an increase in entropy that is independent of the amount of particles in the system?

Say we have two gas containers of $N_{2}$ at the same temperature of $300 ~\text{K}$, one containing $10^{23}$ particles and the other containing $10^{13}$ particles. If we add a quantity of heat to ...
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1answer
81 views

How does a photon raise the temperature of a gas?

The temperature of a fixed volume of a gas is increased when it interacts with radiation. Why does the temperature increase (i.e. why does the velocity of a gas molecule increase) when a photon is ...
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47 views
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69 views

temperature from a molecular point of view

The electric fan increases the velocity and hence the kinetic energy of the molecules in the air. this would mean that the temperature has increased. What's wrong with a conclusion? I want you to ...
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1answer
73 views

Mercury-in-glass thermometer

Question from my textbook: Jason says 'The mercury in the thermometer can be replaced by coloured water. The thermometer will function well after recalibrating using a similar method to calibrating a ...
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0answers
26 views

How long does it take for space dust to stop irradiating energy?

I heard that space dust is detectable because it irradiates on the infrared part of the spectrum? Does this happen forever? Won't it stop after some millions of years? Does it have to irradiate until ...
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1answer
152 views

What is the temperature of the event horizon?

In a discussion with my son about absolute zero, we arrived at the conclusion that the event horizon might be the place to look, as it "absorbs?" all energy, including light. Found this in the ...
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1answer
62 views

What is the difference between temperature difference and temperature change?

In a course of mathematical modelling that I am taking, there is a great confusion between the concepts of temperature change due to a unit heat input at some position $x$ and time $t$, and the ...
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6answers
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Why can't a gas be liquified by pressure above its critical temperature?

What is the cause behind a gas being difficult to liquify above its critical temperature no matter how much pressure is applied on it?
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1answer
48 views

sudden volume increase piston

I am wondering what happens in the following situation. I have a piston filled with an ideal gas for which I suddenly/instantaneaouly iscrease the volume. In particular I want to know what happens to ...
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4answers
424 views

Why does my house seem to warm faster in summer than it cools in winter? [closed]

In summers when we switch off the air conditioner, the room seems to instantly get hot again. But in winter, when we switch off the heater the room seems to remain hot for some time. Why this ...
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1answer
61 views

Will the heat flow rate be same when temperature difference is not same?

If I give heat with a certain source will the change of temperature difference change the heat flow rate? Suppose I have a aluminium rod which has a weight of 25 gram. I heated it up to 40 degree ...
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1answer
60 views

Heating 2 sets of 1L water vs 1 set of 2L water [closed]

Can heating 2 sets of 1L water or 1 set of 2L water have a variation in terms of fuel efficiency? Can one be more fuel-efficient than the other? (migrated from chemistry site)
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1answer
71 views

How to calculate the increase in temperature due to drop? [closed]

Question- Calculate the rise in temperature in celcius in a bucket of water after it is dropped from 50 m where acceleration due to gravity is 10. I know that I need to find the amount of energy ...
0
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1answer
43 views

Does shaking a carbonated soda warm it up?

I had an odd situation where i left a soda near the fridge exhaust and it developed some ice crystals (i could hear it sloshing). When i took it out i instinctively shook up the closed soda can with ...
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2answers
63 views

Thermodynamic expectation value at $T=0$

The thermodynamic expectation value for an observable $A$ is defined as $$\langle A \rangle = \frac{1}{Z} \sum_n \langle\psi_n| e^{-\beta H} A|\psi_n \rangle, \qquad (1)$$ where $\beta=1/k_bT$, the ...
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1answer
43 views

Method used to prove emissive power, $E \propto T^4$

Stefan's Law states that emissive power($E$) of a black body is proportional to $T^4$. But how did Stefan arrive at the conclusion? I mean, it is not possible currently to get a perfectly black body, ...
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2answers
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Why are refrigerators 4 degrees and freezers -18 degrees?

I assume that the refrigerator's temperature of 4 degrees has something to do with the fact that water is densest at that temperature. Does that inhibit microbe growth? But what about the freezer, ...
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1answer
56 views

Temperature of a trapped particle

How is the temperature of the center of mass of a trapped particle (e.g. in a Paul or Penning trap with laser cooling) defined? I assume it has something to do with the equipartition theorem and ...
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1answer
23 views

Temperature moderation

Temperature moderation is closely related to the hydrogen bond, as you guys all know. And this temperature moderation happens everyday to human beings through perspiration. As the water in you body ...
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WIll aluminium foil get hot in microoven if I wrap it with paper?

A aluminium foil doesn't get hot easily because of it's heat conductivity. Will it get hot in microwave oven if I wrap it with paper?
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Sliding Wine Glass [duplicate]

Earlier today, I came across a strange phenomenon involving a just-washed wine glass and a countertop. The gist of it is: when you place a warm wine glass upside-down on the wet countertop, it starts ...
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3answers
134 views

The temperature in space is about 3K, however there are almost no atoms in space. How can there be residual heat?

My understanding is that heat is essentially atomic vibrations. If there are almost no atoms, how can there be residual heat? Also, as I understand in space there is no heat transfer via convection ...
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2answers
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What is the physical explanation for the heat equation?

We know that $\int{\vec v.\vec n \,\ d a}$=$\int{\nabla^2(u)\,\ dx \,\ dy \,\ dz}$ where $\vec v$ is the velocity of the heat flow and $u(x,y,z)$ is the temperature at the point $(x,y,z)$.and $ \vec ...
3
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2answers
752 views

How to interpret Stefan-Boltzmann's law?

The Stefan-Boltzmann equation states $e=\sigma T^4$, but how do we interpret this? Is this completely wrong: A body of size $s^2$ generates the radiation/temperature $T^4$ for a given size and a ...
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1answer
994 views

How do I keep the temperature constant in a Boyle's Law experiment?

I'm trying to get a head start on our lab experiment next week about Boyle's Law. The set-up is we have an air chamber can immersed in a pot of boiling water (which is kept boiling over an electric ...
3
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2answers
130 views

At what wind speed does wind chill's conductive cooling exactly cancel out the compressive heating of the air?

At relatively slow wind speeds such as 15mph, wind chill drains heat from an object as it flows past, and this conductive cooling effect seems to increase as the wind speed increases. However, at very ...
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1answer
108 views

Will I weigh more if I have fever?

$E=mc^2$ means that energy is mass, and adding energy to an object (that is, making it hotter) makes it more massive. So if my body temperature increases, will I weigh more? or will i become lighter ...
2
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1answer
559 views

How Temperature, Pressure and Altitude are related in the atmosphere?

I'm looking for an approximation for the temperature of the atmosphere at any height and pressure. Both altitude and pressure are known variables, I've derived this equation using maxwell's ...
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8answers
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Why does hot water clean better than cold water?

I had a left over coffee cup this morning, and I tried to wash it out. I realized I always instinctively use hot water to clean things, as it seems to work better. A Google search showed that other ...