It's the physical property that indicates the degree/intensity of heat present in a substance or an object. It can be expressed and measured according to various scales.

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Celsius to Fahrenheit confusion: why there is no 1 to x ratio

Why is it not possible to know ratio of 1 degree to how many Fahrenheit and use that to convert from or to Celsius/Fahrenheit. I mean what is really happening. Fahrenheit increases linearly and so ...
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1answer
188 views

Work done on gas by piston [closed]

In this problem there is a cylinder that is closed at both ends and has thermally insulated walls. It is divided into 2 parts by a movable, frictionless, thermally insulated piston. There is a ...
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1answer
293 views

Does increasing the density of a solution decrease the rate of temperature change?

I did an experiment to compare whether salt water (5% concentration of salt) or fresh water of the same volume took longer to heat up to a certain temperature. We found that salt water took longer to ...
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3answers
273 views

How can anything be hotter than the Sun?

I've heard that if a space shuttle enters the atmosphere from a bad angle its surface will become so hot that it will be hotter than the surface of the Sun. How can that be? It seems to an uneducated ...
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2answers
290 views

How would a change in ambient temp affect a radiator?

I'm curious if you have a radiator or say a block of metal (lets say it's copper since it has the highest thermal conductivity) and on one side is a processor producing heat. At idle the processor ...
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Is there an equation for convective heat transfer?

Is there an equation I can use to calculate the temperature (as a function of time) of an object which is gaining or losing heat by convection? Or equivalently, the rate of energy transfer from the ...
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1answer
55 views

Why basements stay cold even during summer?

Why a room below the surface (such as basements) can stay cold all the time? How is it able to avoid the high increase of temperature and heat in hot days and periods?
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1answer
57 views

Determining if a solution will boil

A piston compresses a solution of 40% $HNO_3$ in $H_2O$. If the piston breaks and the pressure is reduced from 12.0 atm to 1.0 atm: a) If the temperature of the solution is 110 degrees C, will the ...
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48 views

Temperature limit of the increase in heat

If the sun is the hottest known thing to humans is it possible to have a temperature greater than the sun?
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2answers
145 views

Measuring Cryogenic Temperatures

I need an inexpensive instrument to measure cryogenic temperatures (down to -200C). I can build a thermistor-based thermometer using an Arduino that is accurate to under 1 degree for 0 to 100C. ...
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1answer
145 views

Why is $0 \,\mathrm{K}$ so special?

I know that $0 \,\mathrm{K}$ cannot be reached, this is discussed here and here. But, why is it such an important statement? I mean, there are many properties which will never be zero, like: ...
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0answers
54 views

Interesting properties exhibited by particles at negative temperature [closed]

I recently read an article which claims that "engine can do more work at negative temperature". The article seemed to have used a lot of jargon and hence a tough read for an amateur physics ...
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3answers
556 views

Would a Cup of Tea Be Hotter If you Add the Milk Before or After Boiling Water?

This is a bit of dispute between work colleagues. An answer would be greatly appreciated. My argument is as follows: If you add X amount of milk at a temperature of M to a mug at room temperature R ...
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1answer
706 views

Why is the change of temperature $\Delta T$ measured in Kelvins, degrees Celsius, etc.?

Let me start by apologizing if this question seems pedantic and say that I'm not very familiar with physics in general, as I'm a math major instead. Anyway, say a body changes from temperature $T_1$ ...
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5answers
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Why isn't absolute $0 K$ temperature possible?

So $T$ is defined as $$T = \left(\frac{\partial E}{\partial S}\right)$$ and $S$ is defined as $$S = k_B \ln \Omega$$ where $\Omega$ is the number of accessible states of the system for a given ...
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2answers
232 views

Incorrect IR temperature reading on stainless steel?

Using a Fluke 62 Mini Infrared Thermometer today on a stainless steel pipe with coolant I noticed that it gives incorrect temperature readings. There is a temperature sensor inside the coolant ...
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2answers
137 views

Would the temperature of a gas change when accelerated in a train?

I was thinking about a situation where some gas is enclosed inside a container and kept in a train at rest. The train accelerates, gains a maximum speed and then suddenly stops. Would the temperature ...
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1answer
329 views

How much energy Maxwell's demon will earn?

Suppose we have one mole of one-atom ideal gas at temperature $T$. Suppose Maxwell's daemon has separated molecules into two sections, one with speed below mean and another with speed above mean. ...
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1answer
68 views

How long will it take to temperatures of two solids to become equal?

If I have two solids with commmon area where they are touching each other, is there any way for calculating the time it will take to them to become equal? For example, I have two blocks of different ...
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3answers
209 views

Why is gas(oline) in gas stations sold by volume (as opposed to mass)?

Fluids (including natural gasoline/petroleum) have variable volume based on the ambient temperature for the same mass of fluid. So, really, the amount of gas that you're filling your car with depends ...
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1k views

Why has Earth's core not become solid?

The Earth is billions of years old, yet its core has not yet cooled down and become solid. Will this happen in the foreseeable future?
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2answers
110 views

CMBR temperature over time?

How has CMBR temperature dropped as function of time? A graph would be nice, but I'd be happy with times (age of universe) when it cooled enough to not be visible to human eye, became room temperature ...
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0answers
55 views

Is it correct to assume that a stretched rubber-band has negative entropy change?

If so, how could we express it in equations connecting S,T,Q? I was wondering if the net change is heat transfer was positive; Since we could feel the heat when it is stretched.
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1answer
78 views

How do I prevent shattering of glass?

I am not an expert of physics, instead I am more good at chemistry. I just wanted to ask that how do I prevent shattering of glasses on sudden large temperature changes? Sometimes, when I have to ...
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2answers
97 views

Ideal Gas Constant

Wikipedia states that the ideal gas constant relates the energy scale to the temperature scale. It serves as the constant of proportionality. This is obvious from the units. If temperature is a ...
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1answer
947 views

Estimate temperature and pressure of steam in a pot of boiling water

Suppose we have a pot of known dimensions filled to level L with boiling water on a stove, covered by a lid with a vent of known dimensions. Given the steady-state temperature of the stove (bottom of ...
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2answers
307 views

Does serving food on a hot plate really keep it warm longer?

I live in Ireland where serving food on hot plates is considered “good cooking practice” to ensure the food remains warm – I come from France where I have rarely seen it done. I am wondering if this ...
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2answers
266 views

Why is the absolute zero -273.15?

I can't find an answer of why the lowest temperature is -273.15ºC. Is it deduced theoretically or is it experimental? An explanation is that when any gas volume tends to zero, the temperature will be ...
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3answers
318 views

Room temperature and fan orientation [duplicate]

So I'm in a tiny dorm room and I normally point my fan blowing outside the window to cool my room off. I've been in some debates on blowing air out or in is more effective, so I'm hoping to get some ...
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0answers
635 views

Definitions in thermodynamics: temperature, thermal equilibrium, heat

I'm currently reading Fermi's "Thermodynamics" and I'm trying to grasp the (possibly different) right definitions for temperature, thermal equilibrium, heat. To clarify, I'm looking for definitions ...
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What happened to high temperatures in the universe?

We know that after the big bang the temperature was about 10^32 K. But now the average temperature of the universe is about 4 K. What happened to the temperature at that time? Where did it go?
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332 views

Help with calculating resistance at a given temperature

The resistance of a bulb filament is $100\Omega$ at a temperature of $100^\circ \text{C}$. If its temperature coefficient of resistance be $0.005 \space \text{per} ^\circ \text{C}$, its resistance ...
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8answers
8k views

Why does the gas get cold when I spray it?

When you spray gas from a compressed spray, the gas gets very cold, even though, the compressed spray is in the room temperature. I think, when it goes from high pressure to lower one, it gets cold, ...
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1answer
1k views

How are the CPU power and temperature caculated/estimated?

From Wikipedia The power consumed by a CPU, is approximately proportional to CPU frequency, and to the square of the CPU voltage: $$ P = C V^2 f $$ (where C is capacitance, f is ...
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The difference between heat and temperature

So as I understand it, heat energy of an object is the SUM of all the kinetic energies of the molecules of the object (upto constant factor). The temperature on the other hand is the AVERAGE of the ...
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23 views

Is the current situation possible for recreaction in a lab?

I want to convert cellulose to another form (crystalline => amorphous). Cellulose requires a temperature of 320 °C and pressure of 25 MPa to become amorphous in water.(Is the pressure achievable in ...
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2answers
556 views

When is temperature not a measure of the average kinetic energy of the particles in a substance?

I had always thought that temperature of a substance was a measure of the average kinetic energy of the particles in that substance: $E_k = (3/2) k_bT $ where $E_k$ is the average kinetic energy of ...
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6answers
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Why is there no absolute maximum temperature?

If temperature makes particles vibrate faster, and movement is limited by the speed of light, then temperature must be limited as well I would assume. Why there is no limits?
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466 views

What's the best strategy to fully fill the fridge with beer bottles and have them all cooled?

I'm having a party. Suppose I'd like to have a fridge full of cold ($6~^\circ\text{C}$ or below) beer bottles, in as short a time frame as possible. The fridge indicates that it is targeting (and ...
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2answers
1k views

Does negative temperature in Carnot cycle yield a counterexample of the second law of thermodynamics?

By Carnot Theorem, the efficiency of Carnot cycle is$$\eta=1-\frac{T_C}{T_H}$$ where $T_C$,$T_H$ are the absolute temperature of the cold reservoir and hot reservoir respectively. Since $T_C > 0$, ...
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1answer
237 views

How do I measure the temperature of a tiny water droplet?

How do I accurately (+/- 0.1 degrees Celsius or better) measure the temperature of a small (5 to 50 microliter) water droplet without noticeably affecting its temperature? The mass of a thermistor or ...
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0answers
59 views

Photon temperature above Electroweak Symmetry Breaking (EWSB) transition

In discussions of the history of our Universe, photon temperature is substituted for time. As the Universe cools, phase transitions break symmetries, including electroweak symmetry. Why does it make ...
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3answers
328 views

How Is It Possible To Measure Extreme Temperatures? (>2M Deg)

Linked Article: Fusion: X-ray laser zaps solid to 2 million degrees The quest to create nuclear fusion may have come a step closer when scientists heated solid matter to two million degrees with ...
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1answer
813 views

What’s the relationship between thermal radiation and Johnson thermal noise?

All objects above absolute zero emit radiation due to random collisions between the atoms they are made of. The spectrum of radiation emitted varies according to the temperature of the object, I ...
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1answer
177 views

Measuring temperature at a distance

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gKYrXHZwtPw In this video it is explained that Land Skin Temperature (LST) are measured by NASA's Aqua and Terra satellites. It seems it works by collecting the ...
2
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3answers
494 views

Less than absolute zero possible? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Temperature below absolute zero? According to this article http://www.sciencemag.org/content/339/6115/52 (preprint: http://arxiv.org/abs/1211.0545) it is. What do you ...
2
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1answer
568 views

How long does it take a warm object to cool in air?

This is a work-related question. A warm steel torus of a given diameter & thickness is left in a room held at a controlled temperature, how long does it take to reach equilibrium? Assume the air ...
4
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1answer
537 views

Opening the fridge door to cool a room

I'm well aware that the default answer to this textbook default question is "it doesn't work", but still, I believe it does. To cool the insides of the fridge, the compressor must do work, and since ...
5
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1answer
423 views

Why does a breeze of wind make us feel cooler? [duplicate]

In my Astronomy class, I learned that temperature results from the speed of air molecules colliding into your skin. Thus, if the air molecules in the room have a high kinetic energy and thus collide ...
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3answers
504 views

What's the basic difference between heat and temperature?

Temperature is usually seen as a calibrated representation of heat but what about latent heat? Eg. Ice and water have different amounts of heat at 0 degree c.