It's the physical property that indicates the degree/intensity of heat present in a substance or an object. It can be expressed and measured according to various scales.

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How effectively does heat flow through copper wire?

If I have a line of copper wire (lets say 1 meter long, 1mm thick) and one end is a flattened disk of copper about the size of a quarter, and I apply a lot of heat to it (I'm talking 800 Celsius) will ...
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Does extreme cold make **everything** extremely brittle?

First of all, I'm genuinely sorry if this question isn't "serious" enough for this forum! A common cliche in movies and tv is that a very tough object (eg the villain) is frozen, and then hit with ...
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Why does an infrared thermometer display very low temperature when being directed to the outer air?

I'm toying with an infrared thermometer - one which you point onto an object, press the button and it instantly measures the temperature by estimating the infrared radiation from the object. It shows ...
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Why does increasing the temperature of a thermistor decrease it's resistance?

Surely, upon an increase in temperature, the atoms within the thermistor would vibrate with more energy and therefore more vigorously, hence making the electrons flowing through the electric circuit ...
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Why does heat added to a system at a lower temperature cause higher entropy increase?

Entropy is defined in my book as $\Delta\ S = \frac{Q}{T}$. To derive the formula it says that entropy should be directly proportional to the heat energy as with more energy the particles would be ...
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Why does hot air rise?

Why does hot air rise? I did an experiment: I made a model of hot air and cool air with marshmallows and toothpicks. The hot air had more volume than the cold air. Then, I weighed it. They both ...
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Given temp and conductivity can I back-calculate to resistance, in order to plug in a new temp value and calculate a more accurate conductivity?

Background: I used a small CTD (conductivity, temperature, depth) recorder to log a series of dive profiles in a mixed coastal estuary. The recorder logged observed temperature and conductivity every ...
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32 views

What are the Fermi and Debye temperature constants?

What are the Fermi temperature and Debye temperature constants? We were discussing these in class and I don't fully understand what these constants are or why we have them. Can anyone explain?
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How to calculate the evaporative cooling rate needed to protect a house from forest fire

Recently in our area there has been a large forest fire and I've been looking into home defense from such things. I am not a physicist - but can do some basic math. I was wondering how I could ...
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129 views

How hot is your photon?

This question comes from my answer to the question Can a cubic meter of space at absolute zero have any object with mass inside? and the related discussion under it. To summarize, I stated that the ...
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Can a cubic meter of space at absolute zero have any object with mass inside?

I ask this question because, I have seen many places where they say the average temperature of the universe is some 2 degrees K and this somehow relates to mass present within a given volume of space. ...
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absolute minimum vs absolute maximum [duplicate]

there is such a thing as a absolute minimum temperature defined by At the physically impossible-to-reach temperature of zero kelvin, or minus 459.67 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 273.15 degrees ...
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Existence of negative temperatures and the definition of entropy

How negative temperatures can be possible has been treated on StackExchange before (several times in fact), but in light of some recent academic discussion, most of these answers seem to be possibly ...
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119 views

Is my conceptual understanding pertaining to heat & temperature correct?

From what I've understood: Heat is the total sum of kinetic energy translational energy possessed by individual atoms in an object. Temperature is the average kinetic energy translational energy ...
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1answer
33 views

How to calculate precipitation chance with basic weather data?

I would like to know if there is any algorithm which allows us to calulate precipation chance with following data: temperature, humidity, illuminance (in lux) and pressure. I've searched it in google, ...
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38 views

Why does a thermal memory need a thermal bath?

In the article "Thermal Memory: A Storage of Phononic Information Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 267203 – Published 29 December 2008" it's said that a thermal memory need a thermal bath, similar to a power ...
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14 views

Trying to determine transient response of air conditioned room

I have an air conditioned room which intakes airflow at temperature $T_{in}$ at a mass flow rate $\dot m$. The air leaks out of the room at mass flow rate $\dot m$ and temperature $T_{room}$. The room ...
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3answers
108 views

Determining a temperature increase from heat energy [closed]

A 15.0g bullet traveling horizontally at 865 $\frac{m}{s}$ passes through at a tank containing $13.5$kg of water and emerges with a speed of $534\frac{m}{s}$. What is the maximum temperature ...
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Time required for water to freeze

recently I was wondering if there is any specific formula in order to calculate how long it takes for certain liquids to freeze (especially water). I know this depends on: the volume of the liquid, ...
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4answers
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What is planetary surface temperature given constant sub-surface temperature?

If a planet of radius $R_1$ has a constant sub-surface temperature $T_0$ at $R_0<R_1$, what is the long-term equilibrium surface temperature $T_1$? Say we assume constant thermal diffusivity of ...
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How does the entropy change during the cooling of a hot coffee in a cold cup?

The second Law of Thermodynamics states that entropy always increases in the universe: things become more disorganised. This means, that if I have a hot coffee in a cold cup, then the heat will ...
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41 views

Constant volume gas thermometer

Well, in the notes I took in thermodynamics' class I have a graph that plots Pressure of boiling point $P_b$ over Pressure of freezing point $P_f$ at constant volume in terms of Pressure of boiling ...
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Increase in Solubility of a Gas with an Increase in Temperature

On the UC Davis ChemWiki I read, "some gases have an increase in solubility with an increase in temperature." I understand why this is applicable to solids in liquids such as water, but why is it ...
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62 views

How does heating in the atmosphere look above 100 km

I have tried without luck to find a graph of temperature change through the atmosphere that goes further up than about 100 km. On this graph: (Source: ...
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Thermometric Properties

A thermocouple thermometer with 10 ohms of resistance is calibrated with its hot junction and cold junction immersed in steam and melting ice respectively. An EMF of 5.6mv is measured. This ...
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Linearity of thermal expansion of metals?

I am having to do a path length correction for a metal tube (stainless steel 316, 16ppm/C) from 0-100 degC. I need to correct to within approximately 1 ppm. How much do typical engineering metals ...
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Celsius to Fahrenheit confusion: why there is no 1 to x ratio?

Why is it not possible to know the ratio of 1°C to how many Fahrenheit and use that to convert from or to Celsius/Fahrenheit? What is really happening? Fahrenheit increases linearly and so does ...
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Why don't the collisions of the particles in a gas affect its temperature?

Temperature is defined as the mean kinetic energy of the system. Now the particles are constantly colliding with each other; as a result of which kinetic energy of each particle changes. ...
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PCF based temperature sensor [closed]

how to calculate relationship of refractive index And temperature for liquids in optics and what are the methods?
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Relation between temperature and pressure?

I was just working on a special question but I ignored the effect of temperature on it and now it becomes very important to me. What is the relation between Pressure and Temperature? Suppose we ...
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Gay-Lussac's Law & the Patriots

This may be a question better suited for xkcd what if? section...but here goes: with all the hoopla around the patriots / colts game and allegations of cheating by deflating footballs, I've read/heard ...
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3answers
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Solar plants and energy conservation

I'd like to apologise if this question is stupid or if it was asked ten thousand times - I haven't found an answer to it. Quite possibly due to mediocre English or abominable knowledge of physics. ...
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2answers
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Why do we call a white led with high color temperature “cool”?

one can buy LED bulbs with defined color temperature. why cool white = many kelvins (= high temperature?) why warm white = few kelvins (= low temperature?)
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Temperature as the independent variable of Lagrangian

I was thinking about applications of the Lagrangian and I started to toy with some ideas and tried to come up with interesting twists. Immediately I thought it would be interesting to use temperature ...
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46 views

Why is temperature vibration?

Why do the atoms in a crystal vibrate at finite temperature?
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Hot water freezing faster than cold water

This question has puzzled me for a long time. There is already a question like this on Physics.SE. John's answer to the question seems quite satisfying. But when I googled the cause I found this and ...
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Average temperature of the universe

Is it possible to define some average temperature of the universe? If yes, what fixes this temperature and how t estimate today's temperature? Is it different from the temperature of the black-body ...
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2answers
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How can I explicit the energy dependence of the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution?

I'm having a bit of a problem figuring out the energy dependent Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution. According to my book (Ashcroft & Mermin) they write the velocity dependent distribution as: ...
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Why aren't the energies of two systems in thermal equilibrium fixed?

In the derivation of the Boltzmann distribution they consider a system $A$, enclosed by a diathermal wall in a heat reservoir $R$. Then they calculate the probability that the system $A$ is in an ...
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Mixing Water at Different Temperature

If I have cup of water at room temperature (say, $25^\circ$C). What would be the resultant temperature if I pour another cup of same amount of water at $100^\circ$C to it? Is it simply ...
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Could the uncertainty principle theoretically be violated at 0 K? [duplicate]

Ok so please excuse me if the following mental argument is completely ridiculous or obviously flawed :P I was reading about how, even at 0 K (assuming we could experimentally reach such a ...
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Blowing on a hot liquid [duplicate]

Lets say you have a nice bowl of piping hot soup. You use your spoon and take a sip and realize its too hot. So you blow on it a few times and now its cooled enough that it doesnt burn your mouth. ...
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Finding the temperature of Earth from temperature of Mars and its distance from Sun [closed]

I am to compute the temperature of planet--in fact I've already found out it's Earth--knowing only: the surface temperature of Mars (210 K) and its distance from Sun (1.524 AU) and of course ...
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Balloon gas temperature experiment in water

In this problem set I have a passage that describes an experiment that looks at the changing temperature as an air filled balloon rises to the surface from the bottom of a water filled tank. The graph ...
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Heat Transfer From a Spaceship in Deep Space

Space is a very low temperature environment, however it also has an extremely small number of particles per unit volume. This leads me to believe that, contrary to popular portrayals of heat loss in ...
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PT100 calibration

I have also asked this on the electronics group, but it is equally relevant to physics of temperature mearurement If I take (say) a class B PT100 sensor with a stated absolute accuracy of +/- 0.3 deg ...
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Is there a “high temperature” variant of 0 degrees Kelvin? [duplicate]

I know that -273.15 degrees celsius, also known as Absolute Zero or 0K is the low temperature limit for objects, but is it possible that there is a 'highest temperature?' I would have to guess that ...
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Negative temperature thermodynamics

I asked this question about thermodynamics. I considered $$T=\frac{\partial U}{\partial S}$$ at constant $V$ and $N$ (number of particles), but now I can't figure out the change of $U$ with respect ...
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How are the CPU power and temperature caculated/estimated?

From Wikipedia The power consumed by a CPU, is approximately proportional to CPU frequency, and to the square of the CPU voltage: $$ P = C V^2 f $$ (where C is capacitance, f is ...
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How can I determine density of a gas only given temperature?

I have a homework problem where exhaust is traveling through an exhaust system (assumed to be air for simplicity) from and engine and then released into the atmosphere. The exhaust is at a temperature ...