0
votes
2answers
66 views

Dimensionless entropy interpretation

Measuring temperature in joules instead in the artificial units of Kelvin would render entropy as a dimensionless quantity. This is quite appealing since entropy has always been quite a misterious ...
12
votes
2answers
966 views

Temperature of a neutron star

In our everyday experience termperature is due to the motion of atoms, molecules, etc. A neutron star, where protons and electrons are fused together to form neutrons, is nothing but a huge nucleus ...
8
votes
2answers
198 views

What conditions do a bunch of atoms need to satisfy to have a temperature?

What conditions do a bunch of atoms need to satisfy to have a temperature? Suppose that we have a beam of helium atoms travelling in a common straight line, equally spaced with the same velocity. If ...
4
votes
3answers
212 views

Existence of negative temperatures and the definition of entropy

How negative temperatures can be possible has been treated on StackExchange before (several times in fact), but in light of some recent academic discussion, most of these answers seem to be possibly ...
4
votes
1answer
181 views

What's the most fundamental definition of temperature?

What's the most fundamental definition of temperature? Is it the definition concern about average energy, number of micro states, or what? By "fundamental", I mean "to be applied" in such general ...
5
votes
1answer
114 views

Is temperature discrete

Because an object's temperature is inversely proportional to the wavelength of blackbody radiation which it emits, physicists have theorized the existence of Planck temperature at around $1.4×10^{32}$ ...
3
votes
3answers
288 views

Is there an upper limit to temperature in thermodynamics or statistical mechanics

In many presentations of statistical mechanics where we have a system of particles having mass, such as the molecules of an ideal gas, the temperature is often equated to the average relative velocity ...
3
votes
2answers
412 views

Physical significance of negative temperature

I read some answers regarding negative temperatures but I think my question is new. I want to know that what is the physical significance of negative temperature. Suppose I say a body has ...
0
votes
1answer
64 views

Law of equipartition

Law of equipartition predicts the heat capacity of gases correctly. It assumes that inter-molecular attraction in gases is negligible (which is true). But for solids, inter-molecular attraction is not ...
2
votes
1answer
76 views

Details in the derivation of the second law starting from the phase space volume

I had a question on one of the details of the derivation of the second law of thermodynamics starting from the phase space volume. I'll type out what I understand so far: Letting the Hamiltonian ...
8
votes
1answer
216 views

Why does $S = k_B \ln W$ not always apply?

I thought for a long time that the Boltzmann formula for entropy, $S = k_B \ln W$, was a universally true statement, or rather the definition of entropy from the perspective of statistical mechanics. ...
4
votes
3answers
391 views

Temperature; Why A Fundamental Quantity?

Temperature is just an indication of the combined property of mass of the molecules and their random motion. We can explain no effective energy transfer between two conducting solid bodies in contact ...
0
votes
2answers
247 views

If quantum gas goes below 0K, is calling 0K absolute zero irrelevant?

Lord Kelvin defined the absolute temperature scale in the mid-1800s in such a way that nothing could be colder than absolute zero. Physicists later realized that the absolute temperature of a gas is ...
5
votes
0answers
445 views

Is Feynman talking about the Zeroth Law of Thermodynamics?

In Volume 1 Chapter 39 of the Feynman Lectures on Physics, Feynman derives the ideal gas law from Newton's laws of motion. But then on page 41-1, he puts a caveat to the derivation he has just ...
8
votes
3answers
543 views

What is the relationship between Maxwell–Boltzmann statistics and the grand canonical ensemble?

In the grand canonical ensemble one derives the expectation value $\langle \hat n_r\rangle^{\pm}$ for fermions and bosons of sort $r$: $$ \langle \hat n_r\rangle^{\pm} \ \propto \ ...
15
votes
5answers
2k views

Why isn't absolute $0 K$ temperature possible?

So $T$ is defined as $$T = \left(\frac{\partial E}{\partial S}\right)$$ and $S$ is defined as $$S = k_B \ln \Omega$$ where $\Omega$ is the number of accessible states of the system for a given ...
4
votes
2answers
930 views

When is temperature not a measure of the average kinetic energy of the particles in a substance?

I had always thought that temperature of a substance was a measure of the average kinetic energy of the particles in that substance: $E_k = (3/2) k_bT $ where $E_k$ is the average kinetic energy of ...
6
votes
4answers
702 views

Can a single molecule have a temperature?

A show on the weather channel said that as a water molecule ascends in the atmosphere it cools. Does it make sense to talk about the temperature of a single molecule?
2
votes
3answers
514 views

What is the general statistical definition of temperature?

Temperature in an isolated system is defined as: $$\frac{1}{T} = -\frac{\partial{S(E,V,N)}}{\partial{E}} $$ But I wonder how one can generalize this to a random system. Or for instance to a point in ...
3
votes
2answers
332 views

Why is the temperature zero in the ground state?

This is probably a simple question: I see this claims in many books, but I can't figure a reason why this is true. So my question is why this claim is true: "If we know that the system is in the ...
2
votes
2answers
86 views

What is the derivation for the exponential energy relation and where does it apply?

Very often when people state a relaxation time $\tau_\text{kin-kin}, \tau_\text{rot-kin}$,, etc. they think of a context where the energy relaxation goes as $\propto\text e^{-t/\tau}$. Related is an ...
2
votes
1answer
61 views

Temperature of a small system

What is wrong if I define temperature of a small system (I mean, a system which has not a large number of particles) by $$1/T = dS/dE$$ ?
2
votes
2answers
812 views

Absolute zero and Heisenberg uncertainty principle

I got to read Feynman vol I and there was written that at absolute zero, molecular motion doesn't cease at all, because if so happens, we will be able to make precise determination of position and ...
2
votes
3answers
529 views

Why the temperature is getting lower when the universe is expanding

As we know, if an ideal gas expands in vacuum, as its energy is unchanged, the temperature remains the same. An ideal gas's energy does not depend on volume. In general, the energy is $kT$ times the ...
3
votes
2answers
363 views

Any example of lower symmetry in high temperature phase than the low temperature phase?

All the phase transition cases I came across so far have this property: the lower temperature phase has lower symmetry than the higher temperature one. But it is nowhere explicitly said that, lower ...
15
votes
3answers
504 views

Could temperature have been defined as $-\partial S/\partial U$?

When coming up with a definition of temperature, it's typical to start with an empirical definition that a system with a hotter temperature tends to lose heat to a system with a colder temperature. ...
1
vote
1answer
339 views

How much energy Maxwell's demon will earn?

Suppose we have one mole of one-atom ideal gas at temperature $T$. Suppose Maxwell's daemon has separated molecules into two sections, one with speed below mean and another with speed above mean. ...
5
votes
2answers
843 views

The analogy between temperature and imaginary time

There are many statements about the relation between time and temperature in statistical physics and quantum field theory, the basic idea is to interpret (inverse) temperature in statistics as "time" ...
3
votes
1answer
535 views

Limit of Fermi-Dirac distribution as $T$ goes to zero

Hopefully this is a simple question, I just can't seem to get my mind around it. I'm to take the limit of the Fermi-Dirac distribution for $T \rightarrow 0$. In this limit the chemical potential is ...
4
votes
4answers
368 views

Why can $\beta$ not be linearly proportional to $T$, that is $\beta = constant \times T$?

$\beta$ in statistical mechanics is equal to $\frac{1}{k_BT}$ in in thermodynamics, but I do not understand why $\beta\propto T^{-1}$ instead of, say, $\beta\propto T$?
5
votes
1answer
293 views

Ideal gas and diatomic gas with same temperature

If a box of ideal gas and another box of diatomic gas are in thermal equilibrium, does it mean that the average translational energy of ideal gas particle (A) is the same as that of diatomic gas ...
5
votes
3answers
854 views

Is temperature an extensive property, like density?

I was thinking about it some time ago, and now that I've discovered this site I would like to ask it here because I couldn't work it out then. I know that the higher temperature the air in my room ...
5
votes
7answers
2k views

Is it theoretically possible to reach 0 kelvin?

I'm having a discussion with someone. I said that it is -even theoretically- impossible to reach 0K, because that would imply that all molecules in the substance would stand perfectly still. He said ...
20
votes
3answers
2k views

Prove that negative absolute temperatures are actually hotter than positive absolute temperatures

Could someone provide me with a mathematical proof of why, a system with an absolute negative Kelvin temperature (such that of a spin system) is hotter than any system with a positive temperature (in ...
3
votes
4answers
1k views

What does third law of thermodynamics tell us?

I just have a question concerning the third law of thermodynamics. The third law describes that the entropy should be a well defined constant if the system reaches the ground state which depends ...
4
votes
1answer
294 views

What are conditions for the existence of a critical value (for a phase transition)?

Can there only be a critical temperature if there is some natural unit for an observable in the model, i.e. if there is a natural scale for something? Otherwise I don't see how for a system there ...
2
votes
3answers
226 views

How to “read” the temperature of an abstract system?

How can I interpret the parameter temperature $T$, if I'm not given the description of the system in terms of the equation of state, $E(S,V\ )$ or $S(E,V\ )$ and so on. In many systems it makes sense ...
4
votes
3answers
1k views

How to understand temperatures of different degrees of freedom?

So I'm reading this book, where after the preface and before the models there is a section called General Notions and Essential Quantities, which introduce some things I don't understand. They regard ...
3
votes
5answers
559 views

Temperature of a System of molecules

Suppose I have a closed system with N molecules in it which are vibrating and all motion equations (rotation, translation and vibration) of the system are known along with any EM field equations in ...
4
votes
5answers
2k views

Is temperature in vacuum zero?

From Wikipedia entry on Kinetic Theory The temperature of an ideal monatomic gas is a measure of the average kinetic energy of its atoms. Now if I remove all the particles from the box shown ...