0
votes
2answers
51 views

How hot particles can get [duplicate]

One way in which an object is affected by temperature rise is that the wavelength of the radiation it emits is gets smaller and smaller. Another way of looking at it is that as an object gets hotter, ...
5
votes
3answers
781 views

Didn't we mess up with the temperature?

The following passage has been extracted from the book "The Feynman Lectures on Physics-Vol l": The mean kinetic energy is a property only of the "temperature." Being a property of the ...
6
votes
3answers
610 views

How is temperature related to color?

I spent some time studying about temperatures and color of objects. It turns out that as we heat something it turns to red, then yellowish white and if we heat it more it turns to bluish-white. Like ...
2
votes
1answer
68 views

How does temperature affect an electrical current

Synopsis I have read an interesting article J. Halderman et al. "Lest we remember: cold boot attacks on encryption keys" in computer science regarding cold booting. The paper discusses how the use ...
5
votes
1answer
114 views

Is temperature discrete

Because an object's temperature is inversely proportional to the wavelength of blackbody radiation which it emits, physicists have theorized the existence of Planck temperature at around $1.4×10^{32}$ ...
2
votes
0answers
22 views

Quantum computing records (storage times)

Long storage times for qubits will be integral in the construction of a scalable quantum computer. This leads me to ask the current state of affairs in our ability to store qubits. Namely, what is the ...
0
votes
1answer
113 views

Semiconductors: why the mass action law is not valid for very low temperatures?

I thought that it was valid for very low temperatures since for it to be valid I think that it is necessary to be in the non-degeneracy condition, which requires $E_G >> k_B T$ (with $E_G$ being ...
1
vote
1answer
183 views

What is the temperature of a quantum particle in a box?

Some simple examples in textbooks include simple 1D systems such as particle in an infinite potential well or in harmonic oscillator potential. It is also said that at absolute temperature of the ...
15
votes
5answers
2k views

Why isn't absolute $0 K$ temperature possible?

So $T$ is defined as $$T = \left(\frac{\partial E}{\partial S}\right)$$ and $S$ is defined as $$S = k_B \ln \Omega$$ where $\Omega$ is the number of accessible states of the system for a given ...
-1
votes
1answer
63 views

Heisenberg's uncertainty and $0 K$ temperature

when a body is subjected to $0 K$ temperature, it becomes rigid. hence if we see in terms of quantum the lattice vibration decreases, resulting in no change in the direction of the Random velocity, ...
2
votes
1answer
182 views

How do the energy eigenvalues of rotational degrees of freedom in statistical mechanics come about?

I want to understand the hierarchy different degrees of freedom of a mechanical system. Specifically, I want to understand which subsystems equibrilate faster and why. This question comes up: Why ...
5
votes
7answers
2k views

Is it theoretically possible to reach 0 kelvin?

I'm having a discussion with someone. I said that it is -even theoretically- impossible to reach 0K, because that would imply that all molecules in the substance would stand perfectly still. He said ...
4
votes
2answers
452 views

Glass melting at near absolute zero?

I read this report and summarise here but my question is - if quantum mechanics will make glass melt at temperatures near absolute zero and it is near absolute zero then wouldn't this be a huge issue ...