We say that something is symmetric if there is some transformation we can perform on that object that leaves some property unchanged. The set of symmetry transformations of an object form a group, and the name of this group is used as the name of the symmetry of the object.

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What are gyrotropic crystals?

I am reading a paper about spin photocurrents that talks about gyrotropic crystals, but I do not find any good explanation what gyrotropy is or how to find out whether a crystal belongs to the ...
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85 views

Non-symmetry of a lagrangian

If a transformation $\Phi \rightarrow \Phi + \alpha \partial \Phi/ \partial \alpha$ is not a symmetry of the Lagrangian, then the Noether current is no longer conserved, but rather $\partial_{\mu}J^{\...
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Constructing Killing tensors from Killing vectors

Background: After reading about Carter constant and symmetries in GR, I became interested in Killing tensors. I tried reading this paper by Alan Barnes, Brian Edgar and Raffaele Rani, discussing ...
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1answer
103 views

Gravitational force and potential in infite slab

Let's say that we have an infinite slab of height $2h$ and mass density $\rho$. Let's define $x,y$ as the axis parallel to the slab and $z$ as the perpendicular one, with $z=0$ at the middle of the ...
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2answers
698 views

Killing Vectors in Schwarzschild Metric

Given the Schwarzschild metric with $(-,+,+,+)$ signature, $$\text ds^2=-\left(1-\frac{2M}{r}\right)dt^2+\left(1-\frac{2M}{r}\right)^{-1}dr^2+r^2(d\theta^2+\sin^2\theta\,d\phi^2)$$ the lack of ...
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1answer
69 views

Transformations of states in quantum mechanics

In Classical Mechanics we usually describe the possible configurations of a system by points on a smooth manifold $M$ which is the configuration manifold of the system. In that case, when we talk ...
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3answers
77 views

Examples of non-linear field symmetries?

Consider a Lagrangian theory of fields $\phi^a(x)$. Sometime such a theory posseses a symmetry (let's talk about internal symmetries for simplicity), which means that the Lagrangian is invariant under ...
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2answers
83 views

Maintaining symmetry? [closed]

Minkowski metric is found to be $$ds^2=-dt^2+dr^2+r^2d\Omega^2$$ where $d\Omega^2$ is the metric on a unit two-sphere. Why should we keep track of the $d\Omega^2$ so that spherical symmetry holds ...
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1answer
127 views

How to find symmetry transformations?

For a given Lagrangian $$ {\cal L} = - \frac{1}{4} F_{\mu \nu} F^{\mu\nu} + |D_{\mu} \phi|^2 -V (\phi) $$ with $\phi = \frac{1}{\sqrt{2}} (\phi^1 + i \phi^2)$, there are the infinitesimal local ...
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37 views

Advanced Quantum Mechanics (Galilean transformations)

I have been reading quantum mechanics textbook by Ballentine, and in the third chapter, he says that the eigenvalues of the transformed operator, A', must remain same as those of A. I am confused ...
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1answer
49 views

Isotropic of Inertial frame?

My understanding of isotropic is the a particular physics law remain same no matter at what direction I look at it? Now suppose in case of inertial frame, we know that its is homogeneous and ...
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Symmetry of retarded R-current correlator in $\mathcal{N}=4$ Super Yang-Mills

The retarded correlator of the R-current $J_\mu$ of $\mathcal{N}=4$ Super Yang-Mills theory is $$ C_{\mu\nu}(x-y)=-i\theta(x^0-y^0)\langle[J_\mu(x),J_\nu(y)]\rangle. $$ In this paper in eq. (2.4), I ...
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1answer
66 views

Lagrangian is isotropic in space

In Landau & Lifshitz Mechanics, while deriving the properties of Lagrangian of a free particle in inertial frame, he uses the following points $:$ As space is homogeneous in inertial frame, a ...
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28 views

Symmetries, source terms, boundary conditions

If I recall correct you can say that e.g. the electric vectorfield is only a function of the radius if the source terms (charge) is spherical and uniform so that a group action that rotates space ...
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1answer
139 views

Noether's Theorem for Hamiltonians and Lagrangians

Looking around I see one version of Noether's Theorem that creates conserved quantities from symmetries that preserve the Lagrangian (e.g. http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/noether.html), and another ...
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1answer
87 views

Why are there only two linearly independet quartic Higgs terms for the adjoint $24$ in $SU(5)$ GUTs?

I've read the statement in countless papers, for example, here Eq. 4.2 or here Eq. 2.1 without any further explanation or reference, that the "most general renormalizable Higgs potential" for an ...
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1answer
58 views

Strong interaction under $SO(3)$ isospin transformation

I'm given the following strong interaction: $$S = \int d^{4}x [\frac{1}{2} \partial_{\mu} \phi^{a} \partial^{\mu} \phi^{a} - \frac{m^2}{2} \phi^{a} \phi^{a}] ,\qquad a = 1,2,3 \text{.}$$ It is stated ...
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1answer
36 views

Gauss law question with regard to this example

I am really confused in Gauss law. Why do E3 and E2 pointing up? and also E1 pointing down? The lecture note said infer from symmetry and you will get the following but I dont really understand. ...
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4answers
224 views

Translational invariance implying diagonal representation in momentum space

I have just come across something in my reading of Peskin and Schroeder that claims that because a function, in this particular case a two-point correlation function, is translationally invariant, it ...
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1answer
36 views

The elementary particles uniformity and its limits in the context of matter [closed]

We know that matter particles are uniform, i.e. they are absolutely identical (1, 2, 3). Particles of various properties are uniform. But if we look at bigger matter elements, when and how does the ...
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1answer
103 views

Help on understanding a concept in Noether's first theorem

Given a Lie group $G$, whose most general transform depends on $\rho$ parameters, under the action of which an integral $I$ is invariant, there are $\rho$ linearly independent combinations of the ...
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0answers
18 views

Discrete translational invariance of lattice systems and conserved quantities [duplicate]

Imagine a crystal lattice with discrete translational symmetry. Is there any way to obtain local periodic conserved quantities by taking a derivative (deliberately left abstract)? The discretised ...
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0answers
77 views

Lagrangians not related via a total time derivative lead to same Noether symmetries?

Having answered my initial two questions (v1), I now consider a third possibility. Consider two Lagrangians that both lead to equivalent equations of motion. Suppose that they are not related via a ...
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117 views

Spin 1/2 wavefunction transformation under inversion and mirror symmetry

I'm considering group-theory applications to condensed matter physics now. In particular I work with the following paper: http://journals.aps.org/pr/pdf/10.1103/PhysRev.100.580 and try to understand ...
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111 views

Galilean invariance/ scale invariance of KPZ

I have problems with understanding what the Galilean invariance of KPZ means and how it is connencted to KPZ scale invariance? How can I see that KPZ is scale invariant? Why this symmetry impose ...
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34 views

C, P and T for Klein-Gordon Field

Taking transformation of Klein-gordon field under C, P and T as $$\phi_{p}(t,r)= \exp(i \alpha_{p}) \phi (t,-r)\ ,$$ $$\phi_{c}(t,r)= \exp(i \alpha_{c}) \phi^\dagger (t,r)\ ,$$ $$ \phi_{T}(t,r)= \...
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1answer
78 views

Work out components $F^{01}$ and $F^{ij}$ of the antisymmetric tensor $F^{\mu\nu}$ under the Lorentz Transform [closed]

Work out explicitly how the components $F^{0i}$ and $F^{ij}$ of the antysymmetric tensor $F^{\mu\nu}$ introduced in chapter I.6 transform under a Lorentz transformation This problem is from Zee, ...
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3answers
702 views

How to prove a symmetric tensor is indeed a tensor?

Our professor defined a rank $(k,l)$ tensor as something that transforms like a tensor as follows: $$T^{\mu_1' \mu_2'...\mu_k'}{}_{\nu_1'\nu_2'...\nu_l'} ~=~ \Lambda^{\mu_1'}{}_{\mu_1}...\Lambda^{\...
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0answers
81 views

Bondi-Metzner-Sachs (BMS) related Question(s)

I started studying the BMS group in connection with the set of papers by A. Strominger et al., also related with the supposed solution of the "Black Hole Information Paradox" by S. W. Hawking http://...
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1answer
354 views

Many Body Physics: Hamiltonian block structure and Symmetries

Consider a many body problem of a small cluster, e.g. the 'Hubbard-Cluster' (albeit the question may be of relevance for other Hamiltonians as well): $$\mathcal{H}=\sum_{<ij>\sigma} t_{ij} (c^\...
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2answers
417 views

When I take a Gaussian surface inside an insulating solid sphere, why does the outer volume have no effect on the electric field?

Say I try to find the magnitude of the electric field at any point within an insulating solid sphere. I know that in the case of a conductor, the electric field within it is 0. However, I have not ...
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1answer
84 views

Is there a systematic way to obtain all conserved quantities of a system?

I'd like to know whether, given a system, there's a way to obtain all the conserved quantities. For instance if the system consists of electric and magnetic fields, the fields must satisfy Maxwell's ...
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1answer
576 views

Why exactly do sometimes universal covers, and sometimes central extensions feature in the application of a symmetry group to quantum physics?

There seem to be two different things one must consider when representing a symmetry group in quantum mechanics: The universal cover: For instance, when representing the rotation group $\mathrm{SO}(...
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1answer
207 views

Difference between symmetry and invariance

I'm wondering what's the real difference between symmetry and invariance in Physics? I believe that sometimes the two words are given the same meaning and some other times they are used in a different ...
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2answers
128 views

Conservation Laws and Symmetry

The toughest of topics in physics, like Quantum Mechanics, Relativity, String theory, can be explained in layman words and many have done so. Though there is no substitute to the understanding a ...
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1answer
57 views

Identical particles: Why only two possibilities?

Given two identical particles, Wikipedia says that the wavefunction of a combined system where the first particle is in state $|n_1\rangle$ and the other one is in $|n_2\rangle$ is $|\psi\rangle=|n_1\...
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1answer
87 views

In field theory, why are some symmetry transformations applied to the field values while other act on the space that the fields are defined on?

My basic understanding is that a field theory consists of symmetry groups, a space $S$ that the symmetry groups act on and of fields defined on that space $S$. In other words, the space $S$ is the ...
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2answers
73 views

Is there a proof that space expanding produces observers at all points that see what we see?

I know that galaxies are moving away from us, and so can see that it's intuitive that if space was expanding, then the astronomical observations from Earth would be the same as at all other points in ...
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1answer
210 views

Highest symmetric non-maximally symmetric spacetime

What is the highest number of symmetries (Killing vectors) that a (4-dimensional) spacetime can have without being maximally symmetric? From what I can see, it seems to be 7 (which includes the ...
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5answers
190 views

Flux of $E$ through the shaded side

A charge $q$ sits at the back corner of a cube, as shown in Figure. What is the flux of $E$ through the shaded side? One of the solution stated that. Looking at the figure, we notice two things: ...
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1answer
200 views

Permutation symmetry - a continuous symmetry?

From quantum mechanics it is known that permutation between identical particles does not change the Hamiltonian. Assuming that the quantum system consists of a very high number of particles such that ...
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0answers
66 views

Using the Mirror Rule to determine the magnetic field of an infinite slab

Consider a slab infinite in the y and z direction but with finite width W in the x direction. Current flows in the (+y) direction. I'm supposed to use the "mirror rule" to show that at a point in the (...
5
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0answers
193 views

Why does physics have so many symmetries?

I have just found out that in order to modify mass in his special theory of relativity, Einstein assumed that energy and momentum are always conserved.$^\dagger$ I think surely there are other ways to ...
1
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1answer
123 views

Canonical spinors from gauge transformations

In this 2006 paper, http://arxiv.org/abs/hep-th/0610128, there is the concept of gauge transformation and how was it employed that I do not fully understand. Note, what will be talked about below is ...
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1answer
77 views

What is meant by invariant under change of coordinates **to first order**?

I am studying elementary Lagrangian mechanics, and I'm a bit confused about the what's meant by invariance of the Lagrangian under change of coordinates to first order. More specifically, Noether's ...
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3answers
125 views

Formulating the Lagrangian in terms of invariant quantities

Consider a closed system consisting of $N$ point particles, whose Lagrangian is given in the standard way, by the total kinetic energy minus the potential energy: $\mathcal{L}(\dot{q},q):= T(\dot{q}) -...
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51 views

How is translational symmetry related to Fourier decomposition?

The book (The Cosmic Microwave Background By Ruth Durrer) about cosmological perturbations says that because of translational symmetry of the background at a constant time, we can decompose our ...
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2answers
128 views

Noether's theorem: meaning of transformation of coordinates

I have a question regarding Noether's theorem. In our introductory QFT class (which is based on the book by Michele Maggiore) we have derived the Noether currents in the same form as displayed in this ...
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1answer
48 views

Are the mass matrices the same if Higgs corresponding to different Cartan generators get a vev?

I'm trying to understand what happens when a Higgs field in the adjoint representation of a given gauge group gets a vacuum expecation value (vev). Normally, the fermions do not couple to adjoint ...
4
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87 views

Target Space Lorentz Invariance vs. World Sheet Weyl Invariance

The Polyakov action, $S\sim \int d^2\sigma\sqrt{\gamma}\, \gamma_{ab}\partial^a X^\mu \partial ^b X_\mu$, has the well known classical symmetries of world sheet diffeomorphism invariance, world ...