We say that something is symmetric if there is some transformation we can perform on that object that leaves some property unchanged. The set of symmetry transformations of an object form a group, and the name of this group is used as the name of the symmetry of the object.

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Is global gauge symmetry really a symmetry and local conserved current in gauge theories?

One way to define a gauge theory is that whenever the Lagrangian is invariant under some local transformations, we say these local transformations are local gauge transformations and the theory is a ...
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31 views

Symmetry Group of system to a given Hamiltonian

I want to determine the symmetry group of the following system: I consider a charged particle in a spherically symmetric potential $V$ and a homogeneous electric field of magnitude $E$ in ...
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148 views

Explanation for the minus sign in $\Omega_3$ in the Kappa symmetry of the Green - Schwarz formalism for F1 strings

Just so that there can be more higher - level physics questions here, let me post this question + answer. Also because I'm a bit sad that there are almost no questions on the Green-Schwarz ...
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Physical significance of Killing vector field along geodesic

Let us denote by $X^i=(1,\vec 0)$ the Killing vector field and by $u^i(s)$ a tangent vector field of a geodesic, where $s$ is some affine parameter. What physical significance do the scalar quantity ...
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1answer
46 views

What are spin and valley symmetries in graphene?

I have been assigned a presentation on a part of a paper (http://arxiv.org/abs/1303.6942). My task is to present on the spin and valley symmetries in graphene, and relate it back to the paper above. ...
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31 views

Finding conserved quantities from Hamiltonian when Symmetry is not evident [on hold]

A particle is moving in 3D space, under a potential $$V = -\frac{\alpha}{r}-\frac{\vec{r} \cdot \vec{\mu}}{r^3 } $$ where $\vec{\mu}$ is some constant vector. I need to show there are three ...
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1answer
100 views

Classical action of the simple harmonic oscillator

I have been calculating the classical action of the harmonic oscillator, the problem I have is that I am only able to solve it if I set the integration limits of the action integral to be $t=T$ and ...
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1answer
223 views

Why do we assume local conformal transformations are symmetries in 2D CFT

The global conformal group in 2D is $SL(2,\mathbb{C})$. It consists of the fractional linear transforms that map the Riemann sphere into itself bijectively and is finite dimensional. However, when ...
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Spontaneous Time Reversal Symmetry Breaking?

It is known that you can break P spontaneously--- look at any chiral molecule for an example. Spontaneous T breaking is harder for me to visualize. Is there a well known condensed matter system which ...
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3answers
176 views

Quantum explanation of Newton's Third Law of Motion

Newton's law states that for every action there is equal and opposite reaction. This law explains how rockets fly in space and accounts for the the majority of the lift action generated by a ...
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2answers
187 views

Changing vector basis in AdS$_3$

I have AdS${}_3$ given as a surface embedded in a 4 dimensional pseudo-Riemannian space $$x^2+y^2-u^2-y^2=-l^2$$ With metric: $$ds^2=dx^2+dy^2-du^2-dv^2$$ I have Killing vectors of that space ...
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32 views

Charge density and space inversion

J. D. Jackson in his book Classical Electrodynamics on page 249 ff. discusses the behaviour of electromagnetic quantities under space inversion (parity operation) and time reversal. He remarks: ...
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183 views

Seeking a quality plain-language description of the Wigner-Eckart theorem

I'm a third year physics undergrad with a very cursory knowledge of quantum mechanics and the formalism involved. For instance, I understand roughly how tensors work and what it means for a tensor to ...
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2answers
139 views

Dirac spinors under Parity transformation or what do the Weyl spinors in a Dirac spinor really stand for?

My problem is understanding the transformation behaviour of a Dirac spinor (in the Weyl basis) under parity transformations. The standard textbook answer is $$\Psi^P = \gamma_0 \Psi = ...
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22 views

Can we use combined symmetry to simplify the calculation of algebraic PSGs?

In classifying mean-field spin liquids under projective construction, the algebraic projective symmetry group (PSG) approach focus on the mathematical construction of the possible extensions of the ...
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50 views

Derivation of correction to canonical stress energy tensor due to addition of total divergence to Lagrangian

It is mentioned in almost every text book that equations of motions are not modified if we add a total divergence of some vector $$\partial_\mu \ X^{\mu}$$ to Lagrangian but canonical stress energy ...
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21 views

Bulk Symmetry corresponding to Yangian Symmetry of Planar N=4?

4D N=4 Super Yang Mills in the planar limit has an infinite dimensional symmetry known as Yangian symmetry. Dualities respect symmetries, so what does this symmetry correspond to in the $AdS_5\times ...
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2answers
107 views

Why isn't our universe symmetric?

Why were random variations introduced in the spherically symmetric universe after Big Bang which made it non-symmetrical. Since the outcome of a coin toss depend on factors such as torque applied, air ...
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2answers
163 views

How can we differentiate between matter and antimatter? [duplicate]

For instance if there was a galaxy, assume it to be made up of antimatter (isolated from other "normal" galaxies), how would we, or rather, would we be able to distinguish if it was made up of matter ...
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104 views

Confusion about two definitions of anomalies

As I am currently studying for an exam about quantum field theory and string theory, I got confused about the notion of "anomalies" and how they are actually defined. Similar questions have already ...
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0answers
24 views

What symmetry operation mixes states with different $\ell$ in hydrogen atom? [duplicate]

We can mix states with different $m$ in hydrogen atom by rotating it around some axis (not coinciding with $z$). Thus rotation is the symmetry operation which mixes states with different $m$. As ...
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1answer
163 views

Why is Planck's constant the same for all particles?

This question came to me while reading Where does de Broglie wavelength $\lambda=h/p$ for massive particles come from? This question has a nice answer that explains that wave number has be ...
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3answers
167 views

What is the symmetry associated with the local particle number conservation law for fluid?

According to Noether's theorem, every continuous symmetry (of the action) yields a conservation law. In fluid, there is a local particle number conservation law, which is ...
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1answer
140 views

Symmetries of a Uniform Magnetic Field

Simple question. A system with a uniform electric field everywhere in space has translational invariance in the directions perpendicular to the electric field but no translational invariance parallel ...
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1answer
40 views

Solution space of a differential equation with 3D rotational symmetry

We know that the space of solutions will be invariant under 3D rotations, but why can we say that the space of solutions will constitute a representation of the rotation group $SO(3)$? We know that a ...
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366 views

Is there a 1-1 correspondence between symmetry and group theory?

The professor in my class of mathematical physics introduces the definition of groups and said that group theory is the mathematics of symmetry. He gave also some examples of groups such as the set ...
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160 views

Invariance of action $\Rightarrow$ covariance of field equations?

Invariance of action $\Rightarrow$ covariance of field equations? Is this statement true? I have only seen examples of this, like the invariance of Electromagnetic action under Lorentz ...
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79 views

Symmetry, gauge, and projective symmetry group (PSG)?

My following questions come from the understanding of the relations between the PSGs for two gauge-equivalent mean-field (MF) Hamiltonians (or MF ansatz). Considering the Schwinger-fermion ...
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1answer
47 views

Choice of the z-axis in the Schrödinger equation for the hydrogen atom

I am reading about the solution of the Schrödinger equation for the hydrogen atom and have a question about the choice of the z-axis. Most websites say that the z-axis is arbitrarily chosen. If so, ...
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1answer
199 views

Hamiltonian Noether's theorem in classical mechanics

How does one think about, and apply, Noether's theorem in the classical mechanical Hamiltonian formalism? From the Lagrangian perspective, Noether's theorem (in 1-D) states that the quantity ...
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1answer
103 views

How to know if the pseudoscalar Yukawa Lagrangian is invariant under chiral transformation?

The pseudo-scalar Yukawa theory Lagrangian is $$\mathcal{L}=\bar{\psi}(i\gamma ^\mu \partial_\mu - m)\psi -g\bar{\psi}i\gamma^5\phi\psi,$$ where $g$ is a coupling constant. How can I show it is ...
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3answers
93 views

Spontaneous symmetry breaking to subspace not giving massless bosons

I'm currently trying to understand spontaneously broken in general and have stumbled upon a weird result which doesn't seem to correspond to my knowledge about broken gauge symmetries. Suppose we ...
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1answer
36 views

Complex scalar field

In his book on Quantum Field Theory, Ryder mentioned in p. 91 under the title Complex Scalar Fields and Electromagnetism, the following: He said that under a global phase transformation $$\phi ...
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Para and ortho hydrogen angular momentum values

In Wikipedia, it is said that: Orthohydrogen, with symmetric nuclear spin functions, can only have rotational wavefunctions that are antisymmetric with respect to permutation of the two protons. ...
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1answer
115 views

Is General Relativity based on a Symmetry?

In short: Is there any kind of symmetry one can start with to derive general relativity (GR)? Longer: Einstein had the opinion that GR was the generalisation of special relativity, because instead of ...
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66 views

Symmetries of AdS$_3$, $SO(2,2)$ and $SL(2,\mathbb{R})\times SL(2,\mathbb{R})$

Basically, I want to know how one can see the $SL(2,\mathbb{R})\times SL(2,\mathbb{R})$ symmetry of AdS$_3$ explicitly. AdS$_3$ can be defined as hyperboloid in $\mathbb{R}^{2,2}$ as $$ ...
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1answer
247 views

Vibrational anharmonic coupling and noise-induced spontaneous symmetry breaking in a hexagonal finite mechanical lattice

Happy holidays, everyone! The following is part question, part visual gallery, and part classical mechanics problem. Inspired by snow over the weekend I began simulating the vibrations of the ...
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2answers
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Symmetric potential and the commutator of parity and hamiltonian

In one dimension - How can one prove that the Hammiltonian and the parity operator commute in the case where the potential is symmetric (an even function)? i.e. that [H, P] = 0 for V(x)=V(-x)
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314 views

Angular momentum in curved spacetime

It is known that the angular momentum components are also a representation of the $SU(2)$ generators. Given a non-trivial spacetime, say a black hole of some kind or AdS space, how can one define the ...
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1answer
37 views

Symmetries of the action of the free classical Klein-Gordon field

I've read that the action for the free classical Klein-Gordon field $$S = \int \mathrm{d}^4x~ \mathcal{L} = \frac{1}{2} \int \mathrm{d}x^4 \left(\partial_\mu \phi(x) \, \partial^\mu \phi(x) - ...
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Simple questions on the symmetric eigenstate and time-reversal (TR) breaking eigenstate?

Followings are two independent questions as implied by the title: (1) Considering a quantum Hamiltonian $H$ possesses some symmetries described by a symmetry group $G=\left \{ g_1,g_2,...,g_n \right ...
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Conductivity Matrix (Symmetry Information)

I'm trying to understand the symmetry content of the conductivity matrix: one information is, presence of time-reversal symmetry causes the off-diagonal terms to vanish. When this is broken (e.g. in ...
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32 views

Discrete Symmetries: Breaking and Preserving

This is not a question, let's list down all the effects resulting from breaking or preserving of various discrete symmetries, on various observables, be it in condensed matter or in high energy. ...
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19 views

Role of the crystallographic point group on properties of tensorial elasticity

If a space point group for a crystal is known, does this automatically define the elastic tensor symmetry of the material? What further implications can be found? The crystallographic subgroups: ...
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1answer
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Is internal symmetry the same as gauge symmetry?

This is more a terminology question. I have seen that some people differentiate between the two types of symmetry: internal symmetry and gauge symmetry (of a field theory). Is there a difference (in ...
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1answer
80 views

Landau's Problem - Poisson bracks of a spherical symmetry function and angular momuntum in z axis

In landau's Mechanics, there's a problem: I think, if the function has the property spherical symmetry, or: $\phi(r,p)=\phi(-r,-p)$ The form suggested by Landau follows this property, but I can't ...
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Can an axisymmetric solution produce antisymmetric eigenfunctions?

I'm solving a vibrating membrane. In order to simplify my calculations, it's tempting to assume axisymmetric behaviour. If I solve an axisymmetric problem, am I going to lose all the antisymmetric ...
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245 views

Who used the concept of symmetries first?

Who "invented" the concept of symmetries? This article is quite extensive, but it blurs the history with the modern understanding. http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/symmetry-breaking/ Some of the ...
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217 views

Which transformations *aren't* symmetries of a Lagrangian?

As far as I understand, Noether's theorem for fields works, as explained in David Tong's QFT lecture notes (page 14) for example, by saying that a transformation $\phi(x) \mapsto \phi(x) + \delta \phi ...
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Consequences of Entropy/Information Reversal in a System?

Can pairs of different physical systems be symmetrical under a process which would turn one of these physical system's entropic and informational contents into another system's respective ...