7
votes
2answers
102 views

Seeking a quality plain-language description of the Wigner-Eckart theorem

I'm a third year physics undergrad with a very cursory knowledge of quantum mechanics and the formalism involved. For instance, I understand roughly how tensors work and what it means for a tensor to ...
0
votes
1answer
43 views

Notation in the book Symmetry by Hermann Weyl

I'm having troubles understanding a notation of the symmetry groups in a book "Symmetry" by Hermann Weyl. On the page 80 of the 1952 Princeton University Press edition of the book, Weyl lists the ...
3
votes
1answer
78 views

Ricci flat compact manifold with $U(1)\times{}SU(2)\times{}SU(3)$ isometry group?

As the title says, is it possible to have a Riemannian Ricci flat compact manifold with $U(1)\times{}SU(2)\times{}SU(3) $ isometry group?
0
votes
0answers
15 views

Computing Parity by numerical tables of characters

I have a table of the characters of a set of wavefunctions for different points in reciprocal space and for different band indices (this is for a solid). For the case of a single irreducible ...
2
votes
0answers
77 views

Why is the projective symmetry group (PSG) called projective?

As discussed by Prof.Wen in the context of the quantum orders of spin liquids, PSG is defined as all the transformations that leave the mean-field ansatz invariant, IGG is the so-called invariant ...
4
votes
1answer
79 views

Possible mechanics based on the known symmetries in the nature (investigating rumor)

Somewhere I've heard about a relative new mathematical result regarding mechanics. Specifically, there is a list of the known symmetries of mechanics (both Newtonian and relativistic), i.e. different ...
0
votes
1answer
113 views

Plotting a bandstructure along High-symmetry points when kx,ky,kz is known

Suppose you know kx,ky,kz points along with the corresponding energies. Basically, you know about the 4-D E(k) dispersion. How you do then convert that data into the bandstructure plots you commonly ...
2
votes
1answer
50 views

Unit determinant for relevant symmetry groups in QFT

When treating QFT we want our theory to be invariant under different symmetry groups, for example, the Standard Model is a non-abelian gauge theory with the symmetry group $U(1)×SU(2)×SU(3)$. ...
8
votes
3answers
200 views

What are particle multiplets in the Standard Model?

The particles of the standard model are often displayed in groupings known as multiplets. I know that this somehow relates to the underlying symmetries of the standard model, which can be viewed as ...
3
votes
2answers
82 views

Why do the states of a spin multiplet have to have the same symmetry?

This was said in Prof. Balakrishnan lecture 19 on quantum mechanics for the case of exchange symmetry, but he showed no reason why. For example, the system corresponding to two spin $\frac{1}{2}$ ...
1
vote
0answers
94 views

what kind of system respects $SU(N)$ symmetry?

I read this post, Is the symmetry group of two spin 1/2 particles $SU(2) \times SU(2)$ or $SU(4)$? If the picked answer is correct, can I believe that an $N$-degenerate system respects $SU(N)$ ...
2
votes
0answers
93 views

Solving the Schrodinger equation with appropriate symmetry

In the paper Markov Fields by Edward Nelson the introduction section claims that analytically continuing a Markov process with appropriate symmetry properties yields the solution of the Schrodinger ...
8
votes
3answers
567 views

Why is the Symmetry Group for the Electroweak force SU(2)xU(1) and not U(2)

Let me first say that I'm a layman who's trying to understand group theory and gauge theory, so excuse me if my question doesn't make sense. Before symmetry breaking, the Electroweak force has 4 ...
2
votes
0answers
107 views

How symmetry is related to the degeneracy?

I have several questions about symmetry in quantum mechanics. It is often said that the degeneracy is the dimension of irreducible representation. I can understand that if the Hamiltonian has a ...
6
votes
1answer
155 views

Symmetries in physics

Can you explain me some of the mathematical details of such concept as symmetries? In physics, we have some manifold, and fields are functions on this manifold. On the one hand, we have symmetries of ...
6
votes
2answers
159 views

Galilean, SE(3), Poincare groups - Central Extension

After having learnt that the Galilean (with its central extension) with an unitary operator $$ U = \sum_{i=1}^3\Big(\delta\theta_iL_i + \delta x_iP_i + \delta\lambda_iG_i +dtH\Big) + ...
12
votes
3answers
415 views

How are symmetries precisely defined?

How are symmetries precisely defined? In basic physics courses it is usual to see arguments on symmetry to derive some equations. This, however, is done in a kind of sloppy way: "we are calculating ...
1
vote
3answers
322 views

Difference between $SU(2)$ and $SU(2)$ gauge transformations?

I hear this jargon all the time, so what is the difference? (Of course this is nothing special to $SU(2)$, but rather I just took it as an example)
3
votes
1answer
221 views

Is the spin-rotation symmetry of Kitaev model $D_2$ or $Q_8$?

It is known that the Kitaev Hamiltonian and its spin-liquid ground state both break the $SU(2)$ spin-rotation symmetry. So what's the spin-rotation-symmetry group for the Kitaev model? It's obvious ...
7
votes
2answers
374 views

How can one see that the Hydrogen atom has $SO(4)$ symmetry?

For solving hydrogen atom energy level by $SO(4)$ symmetry, where does the symmetry come from? How can one see it directly from the Hamiltonian?
2
votes
3answers
132 views

What does “transform among themselves” mean?

I'm reading a script on atomic physics, and there's a chapter on irreducible tensors. I can't understand the meaning of "transform among themselves" in this context: An arbitrary rotation of the ...
1
vote
2answers
339 views

Symmetries & Lie groups in physics

This is not a homework, neither it is any exercise. It is my understanding of $U(1)$ symmetry. I would request if anybody can please correct me on any one of the following understandings: The ...
0
votes
1answer
154 views

Symmetry groups [closed]

I am quite new to this subject. I am just repeating in a few words, what I have learned so far: There are 4 fundamental forces of nature: strong, weak, electromagnetism and gravity. Physicists are ...
6
votes
0answers
260 views

Extended Born relativity, Nambu 3-form and ternary (n-ary) symmetry

Background: Classical Mechanics is based on the Poincare-Cartan two-form $$\omega_2=dx\wedge dp$$ where $p=\dot{x}$. Quantum mechanics is secretly a subtle modification of this. By the other hand, ...
18
votes
5answers
996 views

Elegant approaches to quantum field theory

I have been reading Quantum Mechanics: A Modern Development by L. Ballentine. I like the way everything is deduced starting from symmetry principles. I was wondering if anyone familiar with the book ...
9
votes
2answers
380 views

How to model a symmetry using Lie Groups?

I have been reading lately about Lie groups, and although all books keep listing the groups, and talk about Lie algebras and all that, one thing I still don't know how is it made, and I guess it's the ...
4
votes
3answers
407 views

Must all symmetries have consequences?

Must all symmetries have consequences? We know that transnational invariance, for example, leads to momentum conservation, etc, cf. Noether's Theorem. Is it possible for a theory or a model to have ...
6
votes
1answer
409 views

U(1) Charged Fields

I don't quite understand what is actually meant by a field charged under a $U(1)$ symmetry. Does it mean that when a transformation is applied the field transforms with an additional phase? More ...
4
votes
2answers
344 views

Is there a 1-1 correspondence between symmetry and group theory?

The professor in my class of mathematical physics introduces the definition of groups and said that group theory is the mathematics of symmetry. He gave also some examples of groups such as the set ...
7
votes
2answers
125 views

Group of symmetries of Lagrange's equations

Consider the following statements, for a classical system whose configuration space has dimension $d$: Lagrange equations admit a smaller group of "symmetries" (coordinate change under which ...
20
votes
1answer
149 views

Any use for $F_4$ in hep-th?

In high energy physics, the use of the classical Lie groups are common place, and in the Grand Unification the use of $E_{6,7,8}$ is also common place. In string theory $G_2$ is sometimes utilized, ...
17
votes
2answers
158 views

Can symmetry generators be used for quantization?

Take the Poincaré group for example. The conservation of rest-mass $m_0$ is generated by the invariance with respect to $p^2 = -\partial_\mu\partial^\mu$. Now if one simply claims The state where ...
22
votes
5answers
3k views

What is the usefulness of the Wigner-Eckart theorem?

I am doing some self-study in between undergrad and grad school and I came across the beastly Wigner-Eckart theorem in Sakurai's Modern Quantum Mechanics. I was wondering if someone could tell me why ...
33
votes
8answers
3k views

Is there something similar to Noether's theorem for discrete symmetries?

Noether's theorem states that, for every continuous symmetry of a system, there exists a conserved quantity, e.g. energy conservation for time invariance, charge conservation for $U(1)$. Is there any ...