Surface tension occurs due to the tendency of liquid molecules to favor their own kind. Surface tension is important in fluid multiphase systems typically at small length and velocity

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What causes insects to cast large shadows from where their feet are?

I recently stumbled upon this interesting image of a wasp, floating on water: Assuming this isn't photoshopped, I have a couple of questions: Why do you see its image like that (what's the ...
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Why does a cork float to the side of a glass?

What is this physical phenomenon and when it's happen ? Please take a look at this picture: Link to picture Notice: This is a cork ball attracted to sides of a glass of water
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Stripeless cleaning of windows

Cross post: http://chemistry.stackexchange.com/q/4377/22 Last week I was discussing with a friend how we thought the stripeless cleaning of windows is achieved when using a cleaner like Windex ...
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What are the equations of motion of a hole in a soap bubble?

Imagine the following situation: I have a thin stationary water film, like a soap bubble, suspended inside a large ring. I throw a small loop of string onto the film and punch a hole inside it. How ...
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Are there any liquids with zero surface tension?

Having read the Wikipedia page on superfluids I'm still not sure if stuff like liquid helium at the lambda point actually have surface tension or not. Is superfluidity the same thing? And are there ...
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453 views

Why does string not wick down?

I regularly drink tea at work and I often reuse the tea bags (yes I know I'm a cheapskate). Yesterday afternoon I used a tea bag once and kept it in the cup in case I wanted another cup before I ...
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Surface energy as thermodynamic potential

Consider free energy of sharp interface $\Gamma$ $$ \int_\Gamma \sigma\;\mathrm{d}S $$ or also free energy of diffuse interface of characteristic width $\epsilon$ given by Cahn-Hilliard/Allen-Cahn ...
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1answer
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Why does water flow out of an upside-down bottle? (Rayleigh Taylor Instability)

I am currently reading the excellent book An Indispensable Truth: How Fusion Power Can Save the Planet by Francis F. Chen and I came across this explanation. The Rayleigh–Taylor Instability ...
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Zigzag flow of water along a vertical glass window

I've observed this behavior many times. When it rains, the rainwater will form vertical channels along a glass window. The flow of water is mostly confined within these vertical channels and the ...
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physics of wet hair

I'm curious about the physics behind the clumping of wet hair. More specifically, how the amount of water in hair and distance between hairs affect the clumping process. I know intuitively that when ...
7
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2answers
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How much of the forces when entering water is related to surface tension?

When an object enters water with high velocity, (like in Why is jumping into water from high altitude fatal?), most of it's kinetic energy will be converted, eg to accelerate water, deform the object ...
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145 views

Tension in string due to surface tension

Suppose you take a loop of string and place it on the surface of a liquid, the string should become taut due to surface tension. How would you be able to calculate the tension in the loop of string? ...
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1answer
833 views

How to measure a solid-solid surface energy?

Many techniques exist to measure the surface energy between a liquid and a liquid or a liquid and a gas (see e.g. the wiki page). Methods to measure the surface energy between a solid and a fluid are ...
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296 views

How is the water meniscus at the edge of a capillary tube

Suppose we have a capillary tube in which water can rise to a height of x cm. If we dip the tube such that the height above the surface is less than x, then how will the water meniscus be at the edge ...
6
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2answers
375 views

Hydrostatic pressure on a teapot spout

The phenomenon where water flows on the outside side of a teapot spout is named "The teapot effect", and occurs due to a difference in pressure between water and the atmosphere. Consider the image of ...
6
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3answers
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Why does a bullet bounce off water?

It is known that bullets can ricochet off a body of water. Is surface tension responsible for this or is this the same behavior we see when an asteroid ricochets off the atmosphere? I don't think ...
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927 views

Hydrostatic friction: why do water droplets stay at rest on an inclined glass surface?

Tjis is a non-expert question on a (seemingly simple) text-book topic. The question is about "hydrostatic friction", defined as follows. Consider a drop of water resting on a flat surface. If the ...
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1answer
836 views

Collision frequency at surfaces

Collision frequency for particles in gases is well known, and collision theory is used to derive chemical reaction rates in gases, (and particles in liquid solutions as well). Using the mean velocity ...
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524 views

Surface tension of solutions and mixtures

The inspiration for this question is over on cooking.stackexchange, asking more about actual measurements for commonly consumed liquids, but I'm interested more generally as well. What determines the ...
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Surface tension between water (liquid) methane (gas)

In my project I should calculate surface tension between water and methane with lammps. I write the program.I use SPC model for water and $l_j$ for methane and water - methane. But now I don't know ...
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291 views

Can water pressure ever be high enough to trap gas bubbles or keep them from surfacing?

Can water pressure ever become high enough to trap gas bubbles and/or keep them from surfacing?
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1answer
245 views

Distinctive properties of liquids

The molecules are closely arranged in solids, loosely arranged in liquids and are free to move in gases... But, Why are liquids (especially water) exhibiting these distinctive properties such as ...
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1answer
516 views

Are coffee's properties different enough from water's to cause increased spillage while walking?

I recently found this article, which describes how... It just so happens that the human stride has almost exactly the right frequency to drive the natural oscillations of coffee, when the fluid is ...
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144 views

Dropping condition

Imagine opening a water tap in order to have a smooth and cylindrical outflow and then slowly decrease the flow by adjusting the knob. At a certain moment, the side profile of the flow will become ...
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1answer
184 views

Increment of surface tension with increase of temperature

What is the reason for the increase in surface tension of molten copper/cadmium with increase in temperature?
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Solving the Young-Laplace equation for arbitrary axisymmetric geometry

Say I have a non-ellipsoidal soap bubble and I want to numerically analyse the pressure in the inner lobe of this bubble here: The Young Laplace equation gives the pressure difference across a ...
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1answer
331 views

Lotus effect dust removal

I have found hundreds of papers describing the contact angle of water droplet sitting on hydrophobic surface and the change between Wenzel Regime and the Cassie-Baxter regime. Now, as I understand ...
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Variational principles: Meniscus

In determining the shape of a meniscus, we have to minimize the energy per unit length along the direction perpendicular to the cross-section of the meniscus: $$\frac{E}{L}=\int^L_0 dx [\gamma ...
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How far can water rise above the edge of a glass?

When you fill a glass with water, water forms a concave meniscus with constant contact angle $\theta$ (typically $\theta=20^\circ$ for tap water): Once you reach the top of the glass, the water-air ...
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2answers
202 views

At what size will self-gravitation contribute more to stability than surface tension?

The governments of Earth have embarked on an experiment to place a massive ball of water in orbit. (umm... special water that doesn't freeze) Imagine this to be a fluid with a given density, $\rho$ ...
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1answer
99 views

where does the energy of water droplet go?

My experiment: I took a string (3 mm diameter and wet) and a water source (1 drops per 2 seconds). Then I attached the string to the water source. The string was then tied to ground Observation : ...
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923 views

Why does water sometimes form bubbles when I pour it into a glass?

Sometimes when I'm filling up a container with water from the tap, bubbles will form on the top of the water. They look a little like soap sud bubbles, but there's no soap suds present. I notice, ...
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74 views

Water falling, why does it spin?

I have noticed that water, when falling will rotate. Looking closely at a thin stream from a faucet and placing a flat object mid stream you will see the water is rotating. The further down the stream ...
4
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1answer
44 views

What are circles on broth (eating soup) surface?

Think about broth in the soup, usually it has circles on its surface. What are their properties? Why there are many of them (not a few big blobs)? Are they depended on liquid's temperature? What needs ...
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1answer
301 views

Explanation for breaking up of a stream of water into droplets

Water falling from a tap eventually breaks into droplets at a particular distance from the tap. The distance(from the tap) at which it breaks into droplets is observed to be an increasing function of ...
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200 views

Is this formula for the energy of a configuration of 3 fluids physically reasonable?

I have studied for a couple of months now a mathematical model of the energy of a configuration of immiscible fluids situated in a fixed container such that the fluids fill the container. In other ...
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Cooking pasta: why does adding a lid lead to overflow?

When cooking pasta, some organic foam usually forms on the surface of the boiling water and the situation can be kept under control by adjusting the heat (and/or adding some oil). Covering the pot ...
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54 views

Why do floating objects attract? [duplicate]

Objects floating on the surface of calm water seem to be attracted to one another and tend to come together in a drift. Is this attraction like gravity?
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Properties of liquid and air bubbles

What is/are the properties of a liquid (e.g. viscosity, surface tension) which is conducive to formation of stable bubbles floating in air (not the bubble inside the liquid)? E.g., if soap dissolved ...
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What is the physics behind a soap bubble?

A soap bubble is an extremely thin film of soapy water enclosing air that forms a hollow sphere with an iridescent surface. What fluid dynamical process occurs during the popping of a soap bubble?
3
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2answers
326 views

Why doesn't the water spill out?

In this experiment, a number of coins are put into a cup full of water, without spilling it. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N2mKpZHnEzw Firstly, let me clarify one thing. If you fill up a cup ...
3
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1answer
445 views

Change in appearance of liquid drop due to gravity

A liquid drop is spherical in shape due to surface tension. But why does it appear as a vertical line under the free-fall due to gravity? (E.g. During a rain - falling raindrop) Is there a specified ...
3
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110 views

Formation of meniscus

If molecules at the surface of a liquid have higher energy and want to minimise the surface area, then why is a mensicus formed which of course increases the surface area?
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Does quasi-static motion imply zero energy dissipation?

When a droplet is deposited on a surface with some surface roughness and subsequently tilted it can stick due to pinning (think of droplets on a window after rain). What I am interested in is ...
3
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2answers
86 views

Why is it tension in surface tension?

Why is it called surface tension not surface compression?
3
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1answer
238 views

boundary conditions for liquid with surface tension

so one uses equations of motion to describe liquids (e.g. Navier–Stokes equations). These are equations for $\vec{v}(\vec{r},t)$ with boundary conditions on the surface $S$ of the liquid (e.g. ...
3
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2answers
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Need help understanding dynamic and static contact angles

I've run into a conceptual road block. I'm coming to you guys because I think my adviser is getting annoyed with me. The concept involves a meniscus being pulled up a cylinder. I understand that ...
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0answers
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Why will two bubbles floating on water surface attract each other?

Two identical bubbles floating on water surface will form clumps, according to the "cheerio effect". But what's the detail about the force? It's necessary to calculate the shape of water surface, in ...
3
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0answers
201 views

Finding Surface Tension of water at certain Temperature and Pressure

So the question is: Using the Young-Laplace Equation (if applicable), find the surface tension (dynes/cm) for water at 20 degrees Celsius with 2.5 psi. Round to the nearest tenth. ...
3
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5answers
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How can the surface of a liquid exist if there are no attracting molecules above it?

Okay this is probably a stupid question but here goes: We know that molecules in a liquid are attracted from all the molecules around it so there is no net attraction. Well, then how do the ...