Surface tension occurs due to the tendency of liquid molecules to favor their own kind. Surface tension is important in fluid multiphase systems typically at small length and velocity

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Lower state of energy for 'connected' molecules

Quote from Wikipedia: Another way to view surface tension is in terms of energy. A molecule in contact with a neighbor is in a lower state of energy than if it were alone (not in contact with a ...
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Collision frequency at surfaces

Collision frequency for particles in gases is well known, and collision theory is used to derive chemical reaction rates in gases, (and particles in liquid solutions as well). Using the mean velocity ...
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Causes of surface tension between two fluids

Suppose that we have two fluids $A$ and $B$ in a container $\Omega$, and we notice that $A,B$ do not mix. Can you pleas explain to me what is the cause of this property? What properties of the two ...
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Cooking pasta: why does adding a lid lead to overflow?

When cooking pasta, some organic foam usually forms on the surface of the boiling water and the situation can be kept under control by adjusting the heat (and/or adding some oil). Covering the pot ...
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Does the potential energy of fluid rising on a string change?

Lets say I have a glass of water at rest. Then I go and hang a string above the water (vertically), such as the end of the string is immersed in the water. Over time some of the water is going to ...
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At what size will self-gravitation contribute more to stability than surface tension?

The governments of Earth have embarked on an experiment to place a massive ball of water in orbit. (umm... special water that doesn't freeze) Imagine this to be a fluid with a given density, $\rho$ ...
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Surface Tension of a Liquid - When a liquid body is acclerating

As far as I understand it (which admittedly isn't very far), surface tension forces are made up by the tension-attractive forces of molecules at the liquid-gas/vacuum interface, such as those between ...
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Surface tension of solutions and mixtures

The inspiration for this question is over on cooking.stackexchange, asking more about actual measurements for commonly consumed liquids, but I'm interested more generally as well. What determines the ...
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Hydrostatic friction: why do water droplets stay at rest on an inclined glass surface?

Tjis is a non-expert question on a (seemingly simple) text-book topic. The question is about "hydrostatic friction", defined as follows. Consider a drop of water resting on a flat surface. If the ...
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Bubble formation

I know that surface tension plays a key role in the formation of a bubble. I guess a bubble contains air inside it. Now how is it so that a soap bubble contains air both inside it and outside it? ...
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Properties of liquid and air bubbles

What is/are the properties of a liquid (e.g. viscosity, surface tension) which is conducive to formation of stable bubbles floating in air (not the bubble inside the liquid)? E.g., if soap dissolved ...
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Can a “bowl” shaped liquid half-bubble be free-floating in the air?

Intent: Not looking to make-up something, I seek explanations which are possible to duplicate Description of Phenomenon: The halved side of the bubble would be horizontal to Earth's surface, and the ...
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Dropping condition

Imagine opening a water tap in order to have a smooth and cylindrical outflow and then slowly decrease the flow by adjusting the knob. At a certain moment, the side profile of the flow will become ...
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Are there any liquids with zero surface tension?

Having read the Wikipedia page on superfluids I'm still not sure if stuff like liquid helium at the lambda point actually have surface tension or not. Is superfluidity the same thing? And are there ...