Surface tension occurs due to the tendency of liquid molecules to favor their own kind. Surface tension is important in fluid multiphase systems typically at small length and velocity

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'Applications' of surface tension [closed]

What are some common applications, uses, exploitations of the properties of surface tension? Here is what I mean. A water strider can walk on water, that is a consequence of surface tension. ...
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Why does a bullet bounce off water?

It is known that bullets can ricochet off a body of water. Is surface tension responsible for this or is this the same behavior we see when an asteroid ricochets off the atmosphere? I don't think ...
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What is “surface fluid adhesion energy”?

This is related to my previous question. Pardon me for asking so many questions recently. My physics knowledge is not that good, and some answers are hard to find. In the question in the link, I ...
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Is this formula for the energy of a configuration of 3 fluids physically reasonable?

I have studied for a couple of months now a mathematical model of the energy of a configuration of immiscible fluids situated in a fixed container such that the fluids fill the container. In other ...
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Contact angle formula still holds for liquid liquid interface?

I have seen in http://books.google.fr/books/about/Molecular_theory_of_capillarity.html?id=_ydSF_XUVeEC&redir_esc=y that there is a formula for the contact angle with a solid wall of a liquid-gas ...
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How specifically do emulsifiers work?

I'd like to understand better how emulsifiers prevent droplet coalescence. There must be something more they do than just lower the surface tension between the droplet and the ambient substance. I ...
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Amount of material required for a pressure tank

I read the answer for the question Why is a hot air balloon “stiff”? and thought something sounded ridiculous. My engineering requirement is that the walls be strong enough. Here $T$ will be the ...
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Lower state of energy for 'connected' molecules

Quote from Wikipedia: Another way to view surface tension is in terms of energy. A molecule in contact with a neighbor is in a lower state of energy than if it were alone (not in contact with a ...
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Causes of surface tension between two fluids

Suppose that we have two fluids $A$ and $B$ in a container $\Omega$, and we notice that $A,B$ do not mix. Can you pleas explain to me what is the cause of this property? What properties of the two ...
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Cooking pasta: why does adding a lid lead to overflow?

When cooking pasta, some organic foam usually forms on the surface of the boiling water and the situation can be kept under control by adjusting the heat (and/or adding some oil). Covering the pot ...
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Does the potential energy of fluid rising on a string change?

Lets say I have a glass of water at rest. Then I go and hang a string above the water (vertically), such as the end of the string is immersed in the water. Over time some of the water is going to ...
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At what size will self-gravitation contribute more to stability than surface tension?

The governments of Earth have embarked on an experiment to place a massive ball of water in orbit. (umm... special water that doesn't freeze) Imagine this to be a fluid with a given density, $\rho$ ...
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Bubble formation

I know that surface tension plays a key role in the formation of a bubble. I guess a bubble contains air inside it. Now how is it so that a soap bubble contains air both inside it and outside it? ...
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Dropping condition

Imagine opening a water tap in order to have a smooth and cylindrical outflow and then slowly decrease the flow by adjusting the knob. At a certain moment, the side profile of the flow will become ...
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Are there any liquids with zero surface tension?

Having read the Wikipedia page on superfluids I'm still not sure if stuff like liquid helium at the lambda point actually have surface tension or not. Is superfluidity the same thing? And are there ...