Surface tension occurs due to the tendency of liquid molecules to favor their own kind. Surface tension is important in fluid multiphase systems typically at small length and velocity

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If the surface tension is reduced to half(say by using a surfactant), what would be the effect on the size of an air bubble in the liquid

If I reduce the surface tension to half of the original value, what would be the effect on the size of an air bubble in the fluid? What would be the effect on buoyancy and drag forces? Also, if I ...
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Why does surface tension of water-ethanol binary mixture decrease with increasing concentration of ethanol?

I was thinking that it must be due to weaker hydrogen bonding in ethanol than in water. But then I learnt that Raman Spectroscopy and viscosity measurements suggest that upto a certain ethanol ...
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100 views

Can a fruit fly move through a large bubble without popping it?

Assume what logistics you need to in order for something like this to be possible. Can a fruit fly move through a large bubble without popping it?
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Application of surface tension in thermodynamics [closed]

I'm writing a paper about surface tension, and have problems with finding literature about application of surface tension in measuring some thermodynamics quantities. Can you help me? Thank you
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59 views

Why is raindrop spherical in shape? [duplicate]

As the topic suggests why the raindrop is spherical in shape? Why it is not triangular or bipyramidal or tetrahedral? Is centre of mass or density of water related to it?
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35 views

When drying paint brushes washed with water, which way is the best to orient them?

After washing my paint brushes with soap and water and rinsing them, in order to avoid damage to the bristles and the ferrules and the wooden handle, is it best to hang them bristles down and let ...
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54 views

Is there surface tension between a solid and a liquid?

The molecules of a solid are so tightly bound together that they are fixed in position unlike in a liquid or gas where they may move freely. In that case it seems like the surface tension between the ...
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32 views

Does buoyancy change on smaller scales?

For baseball size objects on the order of centimeters across we have experience with what floats and what doesn't. A stick will float and a rock will not. But what if the rock were a grain of sand? ...
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54 views

What is the cause of the surface tension of the liquids? [duplicate]

What is the cause of the surface tension of the liquids? How to know the direction of tension force on the free surface of the liquid? I know that the surface tension is the force acting normally ...
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30 views

Can a liquid in a tube have a contact angle of 0 or 180 degrees with the tube?

When a liquid is placed in a tube, it makes contact with the solid walls and has a contact angle (the angle between the tangent to the liquid surface and the wall). What does it mean for the contact ...
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49 views

When metal solidified, why is its surface not flat like polished?

I expect that what one can see on the outside of a just solidified piece of metal is just the "raw" surface of the inner stucture. Solidifying metals or alloys arranges in partial christal latices ...
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Is surface tension the result of a pressure drop over the air-water interface or visa versa, for a two sphere system?

For a liquid bridge between two spheres the Young-Laplace equation states that: $\vartriangle p= \gamma\bigl(\frac{1}{R_1}+\frac{1}{R_2}\bigr)$ where $\vartriangle p$ is the capillary pressure ...
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Does wetting of fabric surfaces depend on the microscopic surface structure?

I am trying to coat a polymer fabric with a metal alloy by dipping it into the molten metal. (For example a polyamide like Nylon in eutectic Bi/Sn alloy at 138°C , as in Wetting the surface for ...
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73 views

How does this capillary-action setup not become a perpetual motion machine?

If you have a very thin glass tube and you place it into water, let's say the water in the tube rises to the height of $x$ mm from the surface of the water. What would happen if you poked a hole in ...
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1answer
36 views

The shape of a bubble? [duplicate]

I have always wondered about a shape of a soap bubble. Why is it always spherical and not some other shape (like, cylindrical)? And why are the layers of the soap bubbles so thin? Also when someone ...
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42 views

Wetting the surface for soaking Nylon fabric in metal

I'm trying to create metal covered lace. My sister would use it as an artistic material. An interesting material A relevant point is that the mechanical rigidity of the metal is used, so it is not ...
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1answer
58 views

Does the value of Surface tension (the value of the constant) change with a change in surface area?

Surface Tension or ϒ (as in gamma) is a constant value for a particular fluid in fixed conditions. When we increase the surface area of the interface, more molecules pop up at the surface and ...
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166 views

Meniscus attached to an inclined plate

To be more specific, suppose a hydrophilic infinite plate is stuck into a semi-infinite region of water, above the water is a semi-infinite region of air, when the plate is stuck into the water ...
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139 views

Size of a glass capillary for noticable capillary action

How big would a glass capillary have to be to have noticable capillary action? Also, does capillary action happen in plastic tubes?
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Fluid flowing into small pores

I have some open porous foams with pore sizes ranging from 50-100nm. I want to flow water into this structure but even at 30 atmospheres it would NOT go in. I am looking for a way to calculate the ...
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1answer
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Does the contact angle of a drop depend theoretically on the size of the drop?

According to Wikipedia, contact angle depends on the hydrophobicity of the surface and on thermodynamic equilibrium. But how does it in theory depend on the drop size? In other words, how would a ...
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2answers
62 views

How to find the maximum area of a slot that can keep water in a trough by surface tension?

Assume I have a trough of water 5mm deep. If I cut a slot (oval) into that trough what is the maximum size/area (length x width) that slot can be without leaking? This question is similar to Max. ...
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176 views

Why can liquid mercury sit on salt?

A video shows liquid mercury sitting on top of table salt. Even though the mercury is much denser, it does not sink to the bottom. Why does this happen? Is the mercury just so thick that it is like ...
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What is the maximum net force of surface tension per gram of water?

I've always wondered how much force water exerted through surface tension. By maximum I mean the theoretical pulling/attracting power. Also, what would happen if you raised or lowered the power? ...
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Change in radius of a charged bubble

I was thinking about what'd happen to the radius of a bubble, if a charge is uniformly distributed over it. At the beginning, I thought that the bubble would expand, for sure, because of the ...
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237 views

Why pouring milk from a height makes a chain shape? [duplicate]

I have noticed a chain-like shape when milk is poured from a height into a cup. Actually the chain pattern repeats itself after some distance and again till it reaches the milk in the cup. Any ...
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1answer
122 views

Rate of Dripping of tube

My original problem was to discover the rate at which leaking taps dripped, and its relation with the tap's size, radius, etc. However, I have no clue how taps work, so I simplified the problem. ...
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Walking on water

I was wondering about walking on water. I wonder if we can use surface tension to do this. Lets say I make a pair of shoes in shape which has infinite perimeter (e.g a koch snowflake) with glass. Now ...
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Internal energy given surface tension

Could anyone offer some insight for the following problem: The internal energy and the entropy are proportional to the area. Show that the internal energy per area is given by $$u(T) = \frac{U}{A} = ...
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A cup of water in ZERO gravity

What will happen if I try to pour a cup of water in zero gravity, into another empty cup? Will the water come out of the cup? The adhesive force between the water molecules and the interior of the cup ...
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Can we break surface tension without physical contact?

It's my understanding that surface tension is caused by hydrogen bonding. My question is whether or not we can break that bond, without physical contact. Could we use electricity, light, heat, or ...
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419 views

Negative pressure, tension, and energy conditions

We have lots of common everyday experience with positive pressure, the canonical example is a gas. But other examples of positive pressure are easy to imagine: for instance, a solid that gets ...
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388 views

Surface tension and soap bubbles

In a common experiment, you can make a paper clip float on water due to the strong surface tension. Adding just a tiny bit of soap immediately destroys the surface tension and lets the paper clip ...
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192 views

Under what conditions does Jurin's law work? (and what are its physical basis?)

I searched answer in wikipedia (and other sites) but I found disjointed and contradictory informations. In Jurin's law article they say that the law works if the radius of the tube is smaller than ...
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Surface tension on a sphere (contact angle)

A solid sphere with radius (r) is resting upon water surface due to surface tension of the water.The contact angle is $$\theta$$ . I want to calculate the sphere weight using the water surface ...
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How much energy to overcome surface tension and create air bubble at an air/water interface

here is my question. Hope you'll help me ;-) Consider a test-tube, almost completely filled with water, and closed with a stopper. Turn it over and then remove the stopper. If the diameter of the ...
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116 views

Maximum hole size to stop a fluid passing through a solid

In a previous question, the following is answered in a general sense: Assume I have a inverse cone which holds 200ml water. I am going to cut the tip of the cone to create a small hole. How to ...
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Why is Surface film a stretched membrane due to surface tension

Surface tension is the property of liquid at rest by virtue of which the liquid surface tends to occupy minimum surface area and behave like a stretched membrane. If surface tension is property ...
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1answer
135 views

What causes surface tension actually? [duplicate]

Surface tension has really made me crazy! Surface tension occurs at the interface of air & water. It is a force per unit length tangential to the intersurface. But what actually causes it? One ...
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133 views

How can a droplet of liquid float on the surface of the same liquid?

This can happen during the rain, or when pouring water. Sometimes small (1-2 mm) droplets of water float on the surface for some time (a few seconds) before coalescing with the big body of water. A ...
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239 views

Water VS Soapy Water

I recently did an experiment. I have a cup of tap water, and a cup of tap water mixed with soap. I used an eyedropper to slowly drip drops of tap water onto a penny. Then I cleaned the penny, and ...
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227 views

How thick is the “skin” formed from surface tension?

I learnt in class that surface tension is caused by an unbalanced force at the surface of the liquid due to IMFs, forming a "skin" on the top. Does this mean that the skin is just one molecule thick? ...
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Foam patterns on espresso

When just prepared, an espresso has a thin layer of foam, known as crema, on its surface. As I move my drink from the bar to a table, the motion destroys the homogeneity of the layer, but I've noticed ...
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119 views

Calculation of tension in a loop with force acting outwards

I'm having a few problems with understanding how to calculate tension in a loop. If I have a circular loop, and some force is applied uniformly radially outwards in such a way that the force acting ...
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3answers
970 views

What is the meniscus shape?

What is the shape of a meniscus? I suppose that the problem is very complex, but is the solution known at least for a liquid that wets the wall in a big vessel? (exponential, maybe?)
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3answers
458 views

Why does a pitcher with lemon juice have foam, while one with pure water does not?

Whenever I pour water into lemon juice (pouring directly from the tap into the pitcher, not quietly along its edge) I get a foam on top: The same pitcher with water (same water tap, pitcher, time ...
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4answers
291 views

Why drops form spheres?

Consider a drop of water floating in an inertial frame in STP air (e.g., the ISS). Intuitively, the equilibrium shape of the drop is a sphere. How would one prove that? Is it equivalent to showing ...
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1answer
222 views

Why is surface tension parallel to the interface?

A text says: The surface tension of a liquid results from an imbalance of intermolecular attractive forces, the cohesive forces between molecules: A molecule in the bulk liquid experiences ...
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1answer
149 views

Difference in electrons excitation in Au (111) between perpendicular and diagonal orientation?

In Au (111) single crystalline as shown in attached file, is there a difference the way electrons are excited when they are excited from perpendicular and diagonal orientation as shown in the figure ...
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Viscosity and surface tension

Both viscosity and surface tension are dependent on the intermolecular forces between the molecules of the liquid. Supposing from this, shouldn't there be a directly proportional relationship between ...