Surface tension occurs due to the tendency of liquid molecules to favor their own kind. Surface tension is important in fluid multiphase systems typically at small length and velocity

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Fluid flowing into small pores

I have some open porous foams with pore sizes ranging from 50-100nm. I want to flow water into this structure but even at 30 atmospheres it would NOT go in. I am looking for a way to calculate the ...
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surface tension force problem [on hold]

SO i was solving some surface tension problems and got stuck on this one: To determine water surface tension coefficient pipette is used with a hole of 2mm. Through pipette drips 20 water drops with ...
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Does the contact angle of a drop depend theoretically on the size of the drop?

According to Wikipedia, contact angle depends on the hydrophobicity of the surface and on thermodynamic equilibrium. But how does it in theory depend on the drop size? In other words, how would a ...
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How to find the maximum area of a slot that can keep water in a trough by surface tension?

Assume I have a trough of water 5mm deep. If I cut a slot (oval) into that trough what is the maximum size/area (length x width) that slot can be without leaking? This question is similar to Max. ...
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1answer
65 views

Why can liquid mercury sit on salt?

A video shows liquid mercury sitting on top of table salt. Even though the mercury is much denser, it does not sink to the bottom. Why does this happen? Is the mercury just so thick that it is like ...
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2answers
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What is the maximum net force of surface tension per gram of water?

I've always wondered how much force water exerted through surface tension. By maximum I mean the theoretical pulling/attracting power. Also, what would happen if you raised or lowered the power? ...
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1answer
30 views

Change in radius of a charged bubble

I was thinking about what'd happen to the radius of a bubble, if a charge is uniformly distributed over it. At the beginning, I thought that the bubble would expand, for sure, because of the ...
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2answers
192 views

Why pouring milk from a height makes a chain shape? [duplicate]

I have noticed a chain-like shape when milk is poured from a height into a cup. Actually the chain pattern repeats itself after some distance and again till it reaches the milk in the cup. Any ...
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1answer
62 views

Rate of Dripping of tube

My original problem was to discover the rate at which leaking taps dripped, and its relation with the tap's size, radius, etc. However, I have no clue how taps work, so I simplified the problem. ...
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3answers
82 views

Walking on water

I was wondering about walking on water. I wonder if we can use surface tension to do this. Lets say I make a pair of shoes in shape which has infinite perimeter (e.g a koch snowflake) with glass. Now ...
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0answers
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Internal energy given surface tension

Could anyone offer some insight for the following problem: The internal energy and the entropy are proportional to the area. Show that the internal energy per area is given by $$u(T) = \frac{U}{A} = ...
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4answers
2k views

A cup of water in ZERO gravity

What will happen if I try to pour a cup of water in zero gravity, into another empty cup? Will the water come out of the cup? The adhesive force between the water molecules and the interior of the cup ...
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2answers
63 views

Can we break surface tension without physical contact?

It's my understanding that surface tension is caused by hydrogen bonding. My question is whether or not we can break that bond, without physical contact. Could we use electricity, light, heat, or ...
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5answers
321 views

Negative pressure, tension, and energy conditions

We have lots of common everyday experience with positive pressure, the canonical example is a gas. But other examples of positive pressure are easy to imagine: for instance, a solid that gets ...
3
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2answers
164 views

Surface tension and soap bubbles

In a common experiment, you can make a paper clip float on water due to the strong surface tension. Adding just a tiny bit of soap immediately destroys the surface tension and lets the paper clip ...
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0answers
130 views

Under what conditions does Jurin's law work? (and what are its physical basis?)

I searched answer in wikipedia (and other sites) but I found disjointed and contradictory informations. In Jurin's law article they say that the law works if the radius of the tube is smaller than ...
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0answers
73 views

Surface tension on a sphere (contact angle)

A solid sphere with radius (r) is resting upon water surface due to surface tension of the water.The contact angle is $$\theta$$ . I want to calculate the sphere weight using the water surface ...
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0answers
61 views

How much energy to overcome surface tension and create air bubble at an air/water interface

here is my question. Hope you'll help me ;-) Consider a test-tube, almost completely filled with water, and closed with a stopper. Turn it over and then remove the stopper. If the diameter of the ...
2
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0answers
68 views

Maximum hole size to stop a fluid passing through a solid

In a previous question, the following is answered in a general sense: Assume I have a inverse cone which holds 200ml water. I am going to cut the tip of the cone to create a small hole. How to ...
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1answer
37 views

Why is Surface film a stretched membrane due to surface tension

Surface tension is the property of liquid at rest by virtue of which the liquid surface tends to occupy minimum surface area and behave like a stretched membrane. If surface tension is property ...
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1answer
81 views

What causes surface tension actually? [duplicate]

Surface tension has really made me crazy! Surface tension occurs at the interface of air & water. It is a force per unit length tangential to the intersurface. But what actually causes it? One ...
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1answer
106 views

How can a droplet of liquid float on the surface of the same liquid?

This can happen during the rain, or when pouring water. Sometimes small (1-2 mm) droplets of water float on the surface for some time (a few seconds) before coalescing with the big body of water. A ...
2
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2answers
103 views

Water VS Soapy Water

I recently did an experiment. I have a cup of tap water, and a cup of tap water mixed with soap. I used an eyedropper to slowly drip drops of tap water onto a penny. Then I cleaned the penny, and ...
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2answers
150 views

How thick is the “skin” formed from surface tension?

I learnt in class that surface tension is caused by an unbalanced force at the surface of the liquid due to IMFs, forming a "skin" on the top. Does this mean that the skin is just one molecule thick? ...
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2answers
134 views

Foam patterns on espresso

When just prepared, an espresso has a thin layer of foam, known as crema, on its surface. As I move my drink from the bar to a table, the motion destroys the homogeneity of the layer, but I've noticed ...
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1answer
64 views

Calculation of tension in a loop with force acting outwards

I'm having a few problems with understanding how to calculate tension in a loop. If I have a circular loop, and some force is applied uniformly radially outwards in such a way that the force acting ...
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3answers
752 views

What is the meniscus shape?

What is the shape of a meniscus? I suppose that the problem is very complex, but is the solution known at least for a liquid that wets the wall in a big vessel? (exponential, maybe?)
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3answers
265 views

Why does a pitcher with lemon juice have foam, while one with pure water does not?

Whenever I pour water into lemon juice (pouring directly from the tap into the pitcher, not quietly along its edge) I get a foam on top: The same pitcher with water (same water tap, pitcher, time ...
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4answers
273 views

Why drops form spheres?

Consider a drop of water floating in an inertial frame in STP air (e.g., the ISS). Intuitively, the equilibrium shape of the drop is a sphere. How would one prove that? Is it equivalent to showing ...
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1answer
135 views

Why is surface tension parallel to the interface?

A text says: The surface tension of a liquid results from an imbalance of intermolecular attractive forces, the cohesive forces between molecules: A molecule in the bulk liquid experiences ...
2
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1answer
91 views

Difference in electrons excitation in Au (111) between perpendicular and diagonal orientation?

In Au (111) single crystalline as shown in attached file, is there a difference the way electrons are excited when they are excited from perpendicular and diagonal orientation as shown in the figure ...
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2answers
559 views

Viscosity and surface tension

Both viscosity and surface tension are dependent on the intermolecular forces between the molecules of the liquid. Supposing from this, shouldn't there be a directly proportional relationship between ...
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1answer
100 views

Violation of conservation of energy… or not? [closed]

The work done by surface tension is double the increase in potential energy. This is a clear violation of conservation of energy. What is the flaw here? Work done by surface tension is \begin{align} ...
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2answers
119 views

Why is there a limited range of possible soap bubble size?

Soap bubbles are never "too small" or "too large". What defines the range of possible diameters of a soap bubble? Related questions: Why do steam bubbles increase in size as they rise, Why is the ...
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1answer
123 views

What is the maximum height for a puddle of water, assuming stp?

I wonder if anyone has figured this out. Assuming, standard temperature and pressure(273 K and 1atm), what is the maximum height of a water puddle on a flat surface? There might be some other factors ...
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How to prevent water droplets becoming larger on the tip of a nozzle?

I use an ordinary syringe to generate a single water droplet. However, it is not usually able to make a droplet smaller than 1 mm (because of surface tension forces, inner diameter of needle, etc.) ...
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249 views

finding equation of a water droplet

I have a water droplet which is falling down through its gravity. I've supposed that my droplet is an ellipsoid and I want to find the equation that represents this ellipsoid in XYZ coordinate system. ...
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1answer
86 views

Can a liquid with angle of contact as 90 degrees with a solid surface definitely wet it?

Can we conclusively say something about wetting conditions at this boundary value of angle of contact ($90^o$)?
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0answers
129 views

What does having high/low surface tension mean?

I am talking about air-liquid, air-solid, and solid-liquid interfaces. While studying about the shape of meniscus of a liquid in a glass tube, I came across a conclusion that surface tension at one ...
4
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2answers
123 views

Why do Oreo crumbs float to a single glob at the very center in a glass of milk? [duplicate]

I had Oreos and milk a while ago and left my half-full cup of milk out on the counter. Afterwards I noticed that the crumbs had surfaced in a circular coin-sized glob, and just now I looked again to ...
0
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3answers
132 views

What could be added to tap water to reduce air bubble formation on a submerged object?

Submerge your hand in a bucket of water. Some air bubbles appear immediately and others add to the surface of the hand over time. Is there anything that could be added to the water to reduce the ...
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2answers
112 views

Bubbles of Different Size

Suppose that I have 2 bubbles of different sizes located in a liquid, and assume that both of those bubbles are close to one another. What exactly will happen to both of those bubbles? From a ...
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4answers
245 views

Why does a bubble take a spherical shape?

I suspect this has something to do with thermodynamics and the isoperimetric inequality and I'm interested in a mathematical derivation of this result.
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0answers
54 views

Why is there roughness on every surface?

Why is there roughness on every surface? I think a smooth surface could better minimize the surface energy. Besides, why does the roughness happen to be fractal?
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0answers
28 views

Floating subject on a surface of water

If We put a small floating object (penoplast granule) on a surface of water it performs spiral like movements and eventually sticks to a side of a vial. What physical forces are involved? I'm ...
22
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4answers
5k views

Why is the pressure inside a soap bubble higher than outside?

Apparently, the air inside a soap bubble is under higher pressure than the surrounding air. This is for instance apparent in the sound bubbles make when they burst. Why is the pressure inside the ...
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1answer
40 views

Water Droplet Saturation Phenomenon

What is the term used to describe the behaviour of (for example) a water droplet in free fall when it has reached a certain speed and then the force on the droplet causes the larger droplet to ...
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0answers
146 views

How do adhesive and cohesive forces affect surface tension? [closed]

Surface tension appears at the interface of two immiscible fluids if the cohesive force of attraction is more than adhesive force. What will be the physical effect if the adhesive force is more than ...
0
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1answer
233 views

Capillary action meniscus height in a tube fitted inside another tube?

I was thinking about how would capillary action change in a tube (classic example) and in a tube fitted inside another tube (considering water as the liquid involved). Height of liquid column: ...
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3answers
154 views

Will a drop of liquid flow from from the wide opening to the narrow opening of a thin funnel by the effect of air pressure?

We have a funnel that is thin enough to keep a drop of liquid inside it as shown in this figure. Assuming that the funnel is placed on a horizontal table, will the drop flow from the left side to ...