Supernovae are the result of a star dying in an explosion

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Atificial Supernovae [duplicate]

I just just learned that stars have metals in their cores that could theoretically be harvested by injecting enough mass to cause a supernova. Say someone wanted to do this to our Sun. How would you ...
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What does kinetic energy at infinity mean in terms of supernovae?

I have noticed that in some paper that the term "kinetic energy at infinity" is used. I understand what potential energy with reference to infinity mean, but what does the term kinetic energy of ...
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How did all of the heavy elements on earth get here?

I have often read that a first generation star went supernova and seeded our solar system. It is well known that stars that go supernova are the source of elements heavier than iron. I guess I am ...
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Do the different observed Type Ia supernovae have similar explosion energy?

I have been trying to read about the energetics of observed supernovae for some time. And while the observed core-collapse supernovae have many scientific papers about them trying to estimate the ...
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How to calculate the kinetic energy of supernova ejecta?

I believed I could use $0.5\times M_{ej} V_{ej}^2$, with $M_{ej}$ being the ejected mass and $V_{ej}$ being the velocity of the ejected mass. But I noticed in this and this that the the mean velocity ...
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Gravitational binding energy of a white dwarf at Chandrasekhar limit?

I was trying to calculate the gravitational binding energy of a white dwarf just before it went on a type Ia supernova in order to calculate the kinetic energy of the ejecta, but I wasn't able to get ...
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What does a supernova look like at its peak luminosity?

I know that in some types of supernovae, the cause of the increased luminosity is the radioactive decay of certain elements ejected during the explosion, so a question came to my mind. If the ejected ...
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Could we tell the difference between population I and II (or even III) neutron stars?

This question is related to thoughts I was having about the mass-radius relationship for neutron stars. Is it unique? Is there a single relationship between $P$ and $\rho$ or is there any chance that ...
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Prior binary star system as possible explanation of high-velocity Type II Supernovae remnants

From wikipedia(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supernova) :- "A long-standing puzzle surrounding Type II supernovae is why the compact object remaining after the explosion is given a large velocity away ...
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What effects would we see on Earth if one star of a distant binary system went supernova?

Assume that astronomers on Earth have been monitoring a distant binary star system for a long time (relative to the orbital periods of the binary system) and then they see one star go supernova. Let ...
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What is the percentage of stars that are massive enough to end their lives in a supernova?

I have been searching for the percentage of stars that are massive enough to end their lives as a supernova but couldn't get any result. As far as I know, a star has to be at least 8 times more ...
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What is the significance of supernova imaging in the DES' hunt for dark energy?

Why may supernovae reveal the dark energy responsible for the accelerating expansion of the universe? More specifically why supernovae opposed to other cosmological species?
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Supernovae and black holes?

I think i am correct in saying that a supernova ($Type$ $II$) is caused by the collapse of the core of a giant star. This contraction of the core is stopped by the Pauli exclusion principle and the ...
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Why does gravitational collapse occur suddenly in a supernova progenitor?

I was reading the Wikipedia article on Supernovae, and it says that one of the reasons why a supernova occurs is due to sudden gravitational collapse when the core of the star has little fusable ...
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absorption and emission lines in Cassiopeia A hydrogen spectrum

we recently took a tour to a radio telescope and recorded some spectra, one of them being Cassiopeia A. Looking at the difference in on-source and off-source spectra, we find sharp absorption and ...
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How much energy does the most powerful supernova release in any form other than neutrinos?

I have read most of the supernova article on wikipedia, and there are a lot of numbers and different types of supernovae so I am confused. What I need to know is how much energy is released from some ...
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Neutrinos arrived before the photons (supernova)

A while back I read about the super Kamiokande detector detected a large neutrino flux and then several hours later a supernova was seen. Anyone know of this with sources? I don't recall the source at ...
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Are there any “Neutrinian” standard candles?

Are there any theoretical models/investigations of object far away that could act as some type of neutrinian standard candles? That is, they spew out neutrinos of with some know characteristics that ...
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The delay between neutrinos and gammas in a supernova, and the absolute mass scale of neutrinos

In a supernova explosion (of some type), there is a huge amount of neutrinos and gamma rays produced by a runaway nuclear reaction at the stellar core. In a recent comment, dmckee noted that the ...
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Death by neutrinos - polonium go home

In Randall Munroe's What If? He is calculating the Lethal Neutrinos dose. If you observed a supernova from 1 AU away—and you somehow avoided being being incinerated, vaporized, and converted to ...
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If the absolute horizon were exclusionary of matter, what supernova behaviors would that predict?

Kip S Thorne's "Black Holes & Time Warps", 1994 paperback, p.415, Box 12.1: ... The absolute horizon is just a point when created, but it then expands smoothly, like a balloon being blown up, ...
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Where can I get latest full updated list of supernovae candidates from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey?

I am doing a project where I need the list of supernovae candidates from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) supernova survey. One list is available as part of the data-release-7 (DR7) website. ...
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How would a very nearby supernova shockwave and remnants affect the earth?

I've been reading about supernovae for a while, and I noticed how incredibly fast their shockwave and remnants travel shortly after the explosion. So I thought about how this would affect the earth if ...
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What is the physics behind explosion of Stars? [closed]

Looking at the above photo, you will soon find it is impossible to explain what actually happens (with today's physics), in one word star is like a nuclear fusion bomb which its pressure is in ...
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Number of visible supernovas exploding right now

How many supernovas are going off (visible in principle) right now in the Universe?
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Why does a supernova explode

This is really bugging me. When you look up some educational text about stars life, this is what you find out: Gravity creates the temperature and pressure to start fusion reactions. The fusion ...
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How is the distance to a $\gamma \mathrm{-ray}$ burst (GRB) measured in just a few days?

Recently the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope recorded the most energetic Gamma Ray burst (GRB 130427A) yet observed with a peak $\gamma \mathrm{-ray}$ energy of $94\, \mathrm{GeV}$. Various sources ...
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What happens when a star undergoes gravitational collapse?

Immediately prior to becoming a supernova the core of some types of stars may suffer gravitational collapse. What happens to any planets in orbit around the star at the instant the mass is fully ...
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How long does a supernova last?

Just what the title indicates. Is a supernova over instantaneously? Or, does the (for want of a better word) explosion continue for a while? What is/are the order of timescales involved? EDIT: ...
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Why are *high redshift* measurements of supernovae required to measure dark energy?

Why are high redshift measurements of supernovae required... in order to measure the equation of state parameter of dark energy? The luminosity distance can be written as \begin{equation} d_{L}(z) = ...
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Have we observed another supernova explosion since SN 2008D?

I read the wikipedia article about SN 2008D which says: "Now that it is known what X-ray pattern to look for, the next generation of X-ray satellites is expected to find hundreds of supernovae every ...
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Collision between Neutron stars and Black holes

When two neutron stars or black-holes come closer and closer, their angular velocity increases with decrease of distance and they start to revolve around a constant center with high relativistic ...
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Elements of a Planet reveals nearby supernova remnant?

During a random reading through this site, I found this one: Origin of elements heavier than Iron (Fe)... The answer was "The formation of many elements in earth was due to Supernova nucleosynthesis" ...
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Gamma Ray Bursts

What is the maximum frequency of the Gamma Rays produced during supernovae? And how are these detected by telescopes without getting some serious damage done?
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Why are there not many detectable supernovas?

Astronomers estimate that there are between 200 billion to 400 billion stars contained within the Milky Way and Andromeda Galaxy probably has 1 trillion stars. There may be around 500 billion galaxies ...
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Is there any chance we could eventually observe the supernova of the first (Population III) stars

In an answer to my previous question about the first stars it was stated they probably formed at Z=20 to Z=60 and may have had a mass between tens to 100s to 1000s of times the mass of the Sun. Given ...
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Can neutrino detectors tell what direction the neutrinos came from?

I was reading this question and got to thinking. Can neutrino detectors give us any clue where the neutrinos came from or when a supernova may occur?
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The Opera Neutrino Experiment and the Supernova 1987

So this probably stems from my massive ignorance about post-Newtonian physics but the supernova results of 1987 which measured neutrinos arriving 3 hours before the light from the supernova have been ...
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If neutrinos travel faster than light, how much lead time would we have over detecting supernovas?

In light of the recent story that neutrinos travel faster than photons, I realize the news about this is sensationalistic and many tests still remain, but let's ASSUME neutrinos are eventually proven ...
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New Type of Type Ia supernova. Implications to Dark Energy measurement?

As I understand it, we used Type Ia supernovas to determine that there is some sort of repulsive force (which we call dark energy) making things fly away from us at an accelerated rate. The reason we ...
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Remnant of a supernova

A supernova remnant is the structure resulting from the explosion of a giant star. The supernova remnant is surrounded by an expanding shock wave that is formed from material ejected by the explosion ...
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What happens to the neighboring star of a type Ia supernova?

Supernovae of type "Ia" are those without helium present, but with evidence of silicon present in the spectrum. The most accepted theory is that this type of supernova is the result of mass accretion ...
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How will the luminosity of the current very near supernova Ia “PTF 11kly” develop in the next weeks and why?

Currently there is a unique chance for amateur astronomers to observe a very near type Ia supernova, named PTF 11kly. As standard candles are very important to measure distances in the universe, can ...
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Near-Earth supernova

There are 51 stars within 17 light years of the Earth (source). If one of these stars was to become a supernova, how would they effect the Earth? I have read the Wikipedia article Near-Earth ...
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How much energy does a super nova generate?

For a scene in a SciFi book, I want to know: Is it possible to estimate how much energy per m² an object would receive that hides behind an in-system planet when the sun goes nova?
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What is an approximation of the average number of supernovae every century in the Milky Way?

Besides giving out a number and quoted source I would appreciate a short derivation of this number/formula based on our current data and knowledge of supernovae and the Milky Way. Show some traceable ...
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What was the most distant supernova spotted by a amateur astronomer until today?

What type of commercial amateur telescope and what method (difference imaging,...) did he use for identifying the supernova?
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Is there a method to estimate the atomic yield of a supernova of a given size?

Given a supernova with stellar mass $M$, is there a theoretical method to estimating the isotope yield? If so, what processes are taken into account, and how accurate can the estimate be? Would it be ...
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Do nearby gamma ray busts/supernova damage more than just the ozone layer?

So we know that many people are putting hard constraints on the galactic habitability zone based on the presence of nearby supernova/gamma ray bursts. But if they only affect the ozone layer, then I ...
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What size aperature would I need to find and see the supernova in M51?

On June 2, 2011, a new supernova was identified by an amateur French astronomer in M51. What size telescope aperture would one need to have any chance of seeing this? Given the right sized scope, ...