A flow with no viscosity

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Can superfluids pass through ordinary baryonic matter?

Since superfluids consists of integer spin bosons or effective bosonic Cooper-paired fermions, Pauli Exclusion Principle does not apply to them. They can thus occupy the same quantum state as any ...
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17 views

Capturing superfluid condensation with exact diagonalization

Doing exact diagonalization on bosonic systems is tricky, because the possibility of multiple occupancy means that even the single-site Hilbert space is infinite-dimensional. It's my understanding ...
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Solution to periodic potential GP equation

Boundary condition: $\psi(0)=\psi(2\pi)$, and Hamiltonian (and corresponding nonlinear Schrödinger equation): $$\left[\left(-i\frac{\partial}{\partial\theta}-\Omega\right)^2+2\pi\gamma|\psi(\theta)|^2\...
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1answer
54 views

Rotation of superfluid

I have two questions related to rotation of superfluids. Firstly, what is the main reason that superfluid cannot rotate as a whole object ? (I found that it is true in Landau's Statistical Physics but ...
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1answer
47 views

What is the Single Mode Approximation?

When Girvin and co-workers solved the excited collective modes called magneto-rotons in Fractional Quantum Hall liquids, they used something called the Single Mode Approximation (SMA). My question is: ...
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36 views

Where should I start learning Landau's theory of superfluidity?

Where should I start learning Landau's theory of superfluidity? For a second year undergraduate.
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30 views

Bulk modulus of supercrtical air

For gaseous state air has bulk modulus of ~pressure, but what about bulk modulus values about the supercritical pressure treshold, are these still pretty much same as the pressure or does this ...
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16 views

In a flowing fluid, why the particles are gathering together under critic distance and separating above this distance?

In a flowing fluid has an inner pressure which gives it some abilities. So this fluid is flowing from narrow gates, the speed of flow is increasing while the pressure of fluid is decreasing. If we ...
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1answer
48 views

Why is the symmetric phase in a Bose gas not superfluid?

In the theory of superfluidity in weakly interacting Bose gases, one finds that in the symmetric phase the exctitations have the dispersion relation $\omega = \frac{k^2}{2m}-\mu$ with gap $\Delta=-\...
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50 views

Adiabatic transition from superfluid to Mott insulator?

I have a question about the dynamical passage from superfluid to Mott insulator state in the Bose-Hubbard model. Is it possible to go from superfluid region to the Mott insulator by changing the ...
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1answer
151 views

What is the difference between superfluidity and Bose condensation?

My question is about zero-temperature ground state of a Bose system. Suppose that the system stabilizes a BEC order parameter, say $\langle b^+ \rangle$, and fixes its phase. Is this a superfluid? And ...
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30 views

Do superfluids have zero viscosity?

The Wikipedia definition of a super fluid is: Superfluidity is a state of matter in which the matter behaves like a fluid with zero viscosity As a fluid dynamics guy, I have a hard time ...
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211 views

Why is chemical potential, μ=0 when calculating critical temperature of BECs?

How do we justify taking the chemical potential, $\mu$ as $0$ when calculating the critical temperature of Bose-Einstein Condensates (BECs)? I apologise as I do not how to use LaTeX, for if I did the ...
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1answer
17 views

Why the total nuclear spin is only 0 or 2 for singlet s-wave scatting with $M_F=0$?

when I read the lecture of Feshbach resonance, the lecture on page 15 said that it want to find all s-wave molecules for $M_F=0$. It said when the two atoms are singlet, the total nuclear spin is only ...
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2answers
35 views

Notation in a neutron star superfluidity

In this article "Neutron Star and Superfluidity", by Ka Wai Lou: http://guava.physics.uiuc.edu/~nigel/courses/569/Essays_Fall2010/Files/lo.pdf symbols as $^1S_0$ and $^3 P_2$ are shown, but I not sure ...
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1answer
28 views

How does superfluid helium interact with ultrasound?

Containing liquid helium in it's superfluid state is of course known to be problematic. Escape by crawling up container walls to 'leak' through solid containers and similar difficulties being a ...
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1answer
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Are there any practical applications of Mott insulators and Superfluids?

The potential applications of Bose-Einstein condensated is discussed here, I was wondering whether anyone could produce a similar argument for Superfluids and Mott insulators. EDIT: I fully realise ...
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26 views

Can we 'dope' a fluid to make it become a superfluid?

The only element that can become a superfluid is Helium (He-3 and He-4) since it does not solidify not matter how cold it gets, hence it can reach the superfluid transition temperature whilst still a ...
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What is the equation for the elementary-excitation spectrum of superfluid heluim over whole momentum space?

I have a simple question. What is the equation for the elementary-excitation spectrum of superfluid helium over whole momentum space, not just near the origin (i.e., phonon excitations $\epsilon=cp$) ...
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47 views

Superconductivity and superfluidity energy dissipation

All articles say that in superconductive state, the materials have exactly zero resistance, but is this the case in real life experiment?, because if this were true, a process without energy ...
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Do neutron stars emit stellar flares?

Since stellar flares are formed from the magnetic energy of a star, is it probable to assume that neutron stars can emit stellar flares as well? If so, how would the super fluid material of the star ...
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34 views

why are quantum vortices so large?

Quantum vortices in helium are almost macroscopic, and can be be imaged in a light microscope: http://www.aps.org/units/dfd/pressroom/papers/gaff09.cfm How can vorticity be quantized on such a large ...
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1answer
35 views

How long to drain superfluid from a container with a small hole in the bottom?

The most naive way of thinking would suggest that because there is no viscosity it drains as fast as if you turned the container upside down and let it fall out. However, assuming the hole is smaller ...
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1answer
52 views

How to choose which atoms to cool using optical cooling technology?

Which atoms are easiest to cool down to very low temperatures (e.g. mK)? Which quantities does one need to look at? My very naive guesses so far are: Their mass: the heavier they are they least ...
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65 views

$U(1)$ gauge symmetry in superfluid

The conventional superfluid phase in a Bose-Hubbard ground state has $U(1)$ symmetry. In the presence of spin-orbit coupling (SOC), the superfluid ground state has non-uniform phases. Why do people in ...
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2answers
78 views

Viscosity, bubbles and (super)fluids

3-part question, but I think it's simple enough... Does the tendency for cavitation in a fluid depend on its viscosity? If so what does this imply for superfluids, having 0 viscosity? And for that ...
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Why does not the bare interaction potential appear in the Bogoliubov theory?

They use some effective potential defined by the s-wave scattering length, but not the bare atom-atom interaction $V(r)$. Why? It is standard practice in second quantization to use the bare ...
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Statistical field theories on topological defects

Systems like superconductors and superfluids are often treated by specifying some phenomenological mean field theory where the free energy is given as a functional of some order parameter field. Given ...
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physics of the beaker experiment for superfluid helium

here is an illustration and explanation of the beaker experiment over superfluid helium: So, according to this experiment, can anyone say what is the cause? I mean the superfluids are disconnected ...
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63 views

Specific Heat of Liquid Helium

At the lambda point, the specific heat of Liquid Helium diverges. After searching for a curve, I've found only measured curves. Is there a theoretical curve for this transition?
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101 views

What happens at lambda point?

When Boson gas approach lambda point (no matter from superfluid side or liquid side),the heat capacity tend to diverge, doesn't this mean that we can never drive the gas through lambda point?(cause we ...
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1answer
27 views

Ground state energy of Bose Einstein gas

I am wondering why BE gas ground state contribute no energy.if so, then dose it mean that if we drive the Bose gas to absolute zero,then it doesn't own any energy?
2
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1answer
246 views

Is there any other superfluid element except helium?

Is there any other superfluid element except helium? Everywhere we see and speak about superfluidity, we just speak about superfluid helium. but is't there any other element or material or system ...
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Feshbach resonance in simple terms

I was reading up Feshbach resonances in cold atoms and I was unable to grasp the concept. I will tell you what I have understood. We consider two body scattering processes elastic as well as inelastic....
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Why does the superconductivity hamiltonian have a µ term, while the superfluid does not?

In every discussion of SC and SF that I read (e.g. Simons), the SC Hamiltonian (BCS) has a $\epsilon_k - \mu$ in the kinetic part of the Hamiltonian, while the SF Hamiltonian has just a $\epsilon_k + ...
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Are there any in depth superfluid mechanic analyses of spacetime?

Has there been much work done that treats particles as vortexes in a fluid, or dark matter as bubbles in this fluid (bending space in the same way massive particles (vortexes) are observed to do, but ...
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1answer
556 views

BCS-BEC crossover

It would be really helpful if somebody could describe what does one mean by a BEC-BCS Crossover. I was going through articles available on the topic, but I was unable to grasp the gist of the topic.
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Superfluids (meaning, properties)

I am curious as to what a superfluid is? I have seen videos that say that they have zero viscosity, and I know that it means that there is no friction between the layers of the fluid. But what is its ...
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Precisely speaking, does photon become massive or the phonon become massive, due to Higgs mechanism in superconductor?

Consider the low-energy field theories of superfluids and superconductors. In superfluids, the spontaneous breaking of the order parameter's phase creates phonons as the massless Goldstone bosons.(...
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Superfluid across a temperature gradient

As I understand it, superfluids cannot sustain temperature gradients; specifically, if a gradient is introduced somewhere on the boundary of the superfluid, a "second sound" thermal wave propagates ...
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107 views

Running Euler's disk in a superfluid

I was considering the toy Euler's Disk, a video can be found here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mVl2CBG_h2s I was interested in understanding the behavior of the disk particularly in vacuum and in ...
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What is the Difference between a Lepton and a Fermion?

As the Title Says: I am Wondering what the Difference between a Lepton and A Fermion is. I know they both have an ½ integer spin number e.g. a electron, an atom with an odd mass number such as Helium-...
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1answer
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How two prove the second sound velocity is $1/\sqrt{3}$ times than the first sound [closed]

From Landau two hydrodynamics model in superfluid, we have the result $c_1^2=\frac{\partial P}{\partial \rho}|_T$ and $c_2^2=\frac{\rho_s s^2 T}{\rho_n c}$. In the zero temperature limit, how to ...
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1answer
113 views

Superfluid rotating frame of reference

I'm currently studying a text about Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) and vortices. When they want to study whether a vortex will be formed, they look at the fact wether it's enegetically favorable. ...
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150 views

Superfluid $\Leftrightarrow$ Bose-Einstein condensate?

On the Wikipedia page on superfluidity one can find the sentence not all Bose-Einstein condensates can be regarded as superfluids, and not all superfluids are Bose–Einstein condensates. So I was ...
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How can we see that there is superconductivity/superfluidity in the boundary theory in the holographic principle?

For example in the models for holographic superconductors we can calculate the conductivity. Also there is an energy gap. I can understand that it describes a superconductor. However I have also heard ...
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1answer
112 views

Is a falling, perfect sheet of fluid possible to create?

This is a bit of an abstract question so I'll try explain this as best I can from the bottom up. I would like to know if it is possible to observe a sheet of fluid, much like a sheet of glass, ...
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What is a superfluid in field theoretic terms?

I'm wondering how one precisely defines a superfluid in terms of the effective field theory description. In Nicolis's paper http://arxiv.org/abs/1108.2513 there seems to be an extremely simple ...
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Lev Landau's proof of molecular motion at absolute zero?

I am reading the book "The man they wouldn't let die" by Alexander Dorozynski, which is an biography of Russian theoretical physicist Lev Landau, and I have encountered this passage Absolute zero ...
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Would an airplane flying through superfluid helium experience lift and drag?

Would an airplane flying through superfluid helium experience lift and drag? The airplane is presumed cold enough to not heat up the helium.