Superconductivity is the transmission of current with no resistive losses, and is one of the most active areas of condensed matter physics research.

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Intuitive reasons for superconductivity

Superconductivity I read in a book "Physics - Resnik and Halliday" the explanation of Type-I Superconductors {cold ones} that: The Electrons that make up current at super-cool temperatures move ...
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How does quantum trapping with diamagnets work?

I just saw this demonstration by someone from a Tel Aviv University lab. What they achieved there is mind blowing. I myself own a levitron that uses the Hall effect to levitate a magnet, the problem ...
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Superconducting gap, temperature dependence: how to calculate this integral?

Tinkham (page 63) states that the temperature dependence of the gap energy of a superconductor $\Delta(T)$ can be calculated using the following integral: How can this actually be carried out? I am ...
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How do superconducting materials float in magnetic field?

The movie Avatar got me interested in the subject, but so far I only found sophisticated articles loaded with unfamiliar words. Is there a simple way to explain how magnetic field affects ...
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What is a $p_x + i p_y$ superconductor? Relation to topological superconductors

I often read about s-wave and p-wave superconductors. In particular a $p_x + i p_y$ superconductor - often mentioned in combination with topological superconductors. I understand that the overall ...
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Can current be induced in a superconductor?

Moving a magnet close to a conductor induces a current. If it consists of a superconducting material with resistance $R=0$, then my textbook says: Then the induced current will continue to flow ...
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Anticommutatorrelation in Bogoliubov-de Gennes Hamiltonian

I almost solved the problem Equivalence of Bogoliubov-de Gennes Hamiltonian for nanowire. In the next steps I used the notation by arXiv:0707.1692: $$ \Psi^{\dagger} = ...
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How does a phonon cause two electrons to attract each other and form a cooper pair?

We know that like charges repel each other. But my professor claimed that two electrons can attract each other as well. What he said was that due to screening an electron travelling at some speed ...
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Where does the phase difference come from in a Josephson Junction?

When you separate two superconductors by a thin insulating film, a current $I(t)=I_0 \sin{\theta(t)}$ flows between the superconductors, where $\theta$ is the phase difference between the ...
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How can Ohm's law be correct if superconductors have 0 resistivity?

Ohm's law states that the relationship between current ( I ) voltage ( V ) and resistance ( R ) is $$I = \frac{V}{R}$$ However superconductors cause the resistance of a material to go to zero, and ...
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Why is high temperature superconductivity so hard to solve?

The phenomenon of high temperature superconductivity has been known for decades, particularly layered cuprate superconductors. We know the precise lattice structure of the materials. We know the band ...
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Experimental signature of topological superconductor

I was wondering if someone can provides some clear experimental signatures of a topological superconductors ? I was thinking about that, because for topological insulator, one of the hallmarks is ...
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Superconductor symmetry breaking

When water freezes continuous translational symmetry is broken. When a metal becomes superconducting, what is the symmetry that gets broken?
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Can superconducting magnets fly (or repel the earth's core)?

If a superconducting magnet and appropriate power supply had just enough $I\cdot s$ (current $\cdot$ length) so that when it was perpendicular to the earth's magnetic field, the force of the ...
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How come a photon acts like it has mass in a superconducting field?

I've heard the Higgs mechanism explained as analogous to the reason that a photon acts like it has mass in a superconducting field. However, that's not too helpful if I don't understand the latter. ...
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Shine a light into a superconductor

A type-I superconductor can expel almost all magnetic flux (below some critical value $H_c$) from its interior when superconducting. Light as we know is an electromagnetic wave. So what would happen ...
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Relativistic drift velocity of electrons in a superconductor?

Is there a formula for the effective speed of electron currents inside superconductors? The formula for normal conductors is: $$ V = \frac{I}{nAq}$$ I wonder if there are any changes to this ...
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How can I put a permanent current into a superconducting loop?

I know that you can use induction to create a current in a superconducting loop, but this only works as long as the coil that induces the field has a current flowing through it. And obviously, this ...
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Superfluidity and superconductivity?

Superfluidity and superconductivity? Is there any relation between the two aside from the fact that they are somewhat analogies , I see a lot of people on the internet who claim the helium (in it's ...
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Could some astronomical objects have superconducting properties?

The colder it is, the more efficient the superconductivity process works. And as we know, if there is no star nearby, space gets pretty cold. I do appreciate that many condensed, burnt out, stars ...
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Simple & intuitive explanation of superfluidity?

I know that superfluidity is caused by the fluid having zero viscosity. This only happens at very low temperature, so the fluid (e.g. Helium-4) is a Bose-Einstein condensate. I also know that in a ...
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In what way do Cooper pairs of electrons bond and stay bonded in superconductors?

I understand how electrons initially move into another's vicinity, but nowhere can I find a fathomable answer to this. Also, does the pairs forming 'a condensate' mean a Bose-Einstein condensate?
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If a superconductor has zero resistance, does it have infinite amperage?

If amps = volts / ohms, and ohms is 0, then what is x volts / 0 ohms?
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Why does a superconductor obey particle-hole symmetry?

We normally solve the Bogoliubov-de Gennes (BdG) equations in order to compute the energy spectrum of a superconductor. The Nambu spinor is a common object that is used in formulating these equations. ...
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Can one define wavefunction for Bogoliubov quasiparticle excitation in a superconductor?

Wavefunction is essentially a single particle concept. It is easily extended to multiparticle system as follows- if one has say five electrons the wavefunction of this five electron state is any ...
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Can a superconducting wire conduct unlimited current?

A superconducting wire has no electrical resistance and as such it does not heat up when current passes through it. Non-superconducting wires can be damaged by too much current, because they get too ...
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How is Meissner effect explained by BCS theory?

Someone says we can derive the GL equations from BCS theory, which can explain Meissner effect, but I want a more clear physical picture of this phenomena.
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Is current in superconductors infinite? If they have 0 resistance then I (V/R) should be infinite? [duplicate]

I learned many years ago that according to Ohm's law, current is equal to voltage divided by resistance. Now if superconductors have zero resistance then the current should be infinite. Moreover the ...
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Aharonov-Bohm Effect and Flux Quantization in superconductors

Why is the magnetic flux not quantized in a standard Aharonov-Bohm (infinite) solenoid setup, whereas in a superconductor setting, flux is quantized?
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What do massive photons have to do with superconductivity?

I keep reading that the idea of massive photons leads to an explanation of the Meissner effect but I fail to see how photons are involved with the repulsion of fields inside a superconductor. How ...
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Superconductivity and time-reversal symmetry

Let us consider a system of a 1D edge of a 2D topological insulator in proximity to an s-wave superconductor. The system is described by the Hamiltonian: $$ H =\frac{1}{2} \int \mathrm{d}x \ ...
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superconductor levitating in earth's magnetic field? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Can superconducting magnets fly (or repel the earth's core)? I've seen superconductors levitating on magnets. But is it possible for superconductors to levitate on ...
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What are the easiest to get/make LN2 superconductors?

I am starting to build multistage Peltier cooler at the moment, and it should be able to reach -100C at least (but if I fail I can always get boring LN2). Doing some experiments with superconductors ...
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Why superconductors aren't used in space?

As we all know temperature of space is near to absolute zero.Then why super conductors aren't used there?
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What is the RC time constant in a superconductor?

In conventional conductors, the RC time constant is the time required to charge or discharge a capacitor through a resistor by ≈ 63.2 percent of the difference between the initial value and final ...
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To what extent can the superconducting order parameter be thought of as a macroscopic wavefunction?

I know that the order parameter does not obey the Schrodinger equation; it instead obeys the Ginzburg-Landau equation. However, I am unclear as to the situations under which the view of the ...
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Can an analog to the Meissner Effect be proposed for matter and gravitational fields?

In the study of electromagnetic fields and quantum electrodynamics we observe and theorize on the behavior of superconductivity and the Meissner effect. Has an analog of these behaviors been proposed ...
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Charging by induction [closed]

When we charge an conductor by induction and grounding, we first bring a negative charge to the conductor. As a result the mobile electrons of the conductor get repelled and stay far from the negative ...
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A correct explanation for the levitation of a superconductor above a magnet [duplicate]

I teach high school physics and I'm trying to put together a correct explanation for the levitation of a superconductor above a magnet without a high level of quantum mechanics (but consistent). I ...
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Superconductor general concept questions

I was thinking about building an electric motor using superconductors and I have some general concept questions in regards to how the behavior might be different from ordinary wires. The Meissner ...
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Literature Request: Introduction to d-wave superconductivity

I'm looking for a pedagogic introduction to d-wave superconductivity. Ideally, this would involve a derivation of d-wave superconductivity and the form of the gap parameter from some fundamental ...
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Lorentz force on type II superconductors?

The electrical resistance being zero in a superconductor, if a magnetic field is strong enough to generate vortices where the flux lines will pass through the material, and the current flow is ...
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Why is there an energy gap in superconductors?

I'm a little out of my depth here... I'm trying to understand quasiparticle tunnelling in superconductor-insulator-superconductor junctions. Many books use the "semiconductor model" to explain this: ...
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Superconductivity: why can't the resistance reach 0?

When we study electricity in high school we examine the resistance of conductors and its relation with temperature. Diagrams show the relationship at the beginning is pretty much a linear with ...
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Strength of Magnetic Field Around a Superconductor

I recently learned that the strength of a Magnetic field around a conductor is proportional to the current flowing in it. So if we have a Mercury wire at absolute zero and pass a current through it ...
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Reference needed for Iron-based superconductors

Iron-based superconductor is a class of high-$T_c$ superconductors discovered in 2008. Are there any review papers about these superconductors yet? If not, which are the key papers in the field?
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What is “quantum locking”?

I've always assumed that "quantum locking" was a term invented by the writers of Dr Who, but this video suggests otherwise. What is quantum locking? Is it real?
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How is stable levitation possible?

This question is with reference to the video in this blog post: http://www.universetoday.com/90183/quantum-levitation-and-the-superconductor/ My question is the following: how is the disc stable in ...
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If increasing applying energy to an atom excites electrons, why does electrical conductivity decrease as temperature increases?

Applying energy to an atom makes the electrons jump up to higher energy levels. This is known as excitation. Electrons on higher energy levels are easier to remove from an atom than those on lower ...
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Why do electrons not bump into impurities in a superconductor?

Just a simple question. Why is it, that when a material becomes superconducting, and by that gets zero resistivity, the electrons don't hit impurities in the material? For the material to have zero ...