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41
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1answer
2k views

Why does dry spaghetti break into three pieces as opposed to only two?

You can try it with your own uncooked spaghetti if you want; it almost always breaks into three when you snap it. I am asking for a good physical theory on why this is along with evidence to back it ...
8
votes
2answers
532 views

Tearing a piece paper along a crease

Why is it easier to tear paper along a crease? To word it differently: why does a "tear" progress along a crease, if one is present?
8
votes
3answers
15k views

Hollow Tube Stronger than Solid bar of same Outside Diameter (O.D.)?

I was listening to some co-workers talking about problems meeting stiffness requirements. Someone said that even with a solid metal rod (instead of the existing tube) we could not meet stiffness ...
7
votes
3answers
234 views

How wide does a wall of ice need to be to stay in place?

Let us say that we have unlimited manpower to construct a huge wall of water ice e.g. 200 m tall (700 feet). -and that the wall is placed in a climate, where the temperature never (for your purpose) ...
5
votes
4answers
411 views

Why are stresses of continuum systems described via a tensor?

The tittle pretty much says enough. I have always been told so but no one really motivated it. So, I would like to know why do we use a tensor to describe the stresses in continuum mechanics.
4
votes
3answers
350 views

Does zero strain always imply zero stress?

In solid mechanics, can I always assume that if an object undergoes no strain, then no stress is applied to it? I think it's true only because I can't seem to find a counter-example.
4
votes
3answers
443 views

Calculating stress without strain

I am working on an algorithm for a real-time simulation. I would like to calculate to extremely permissive tolerances approximate values for the stress within a 2D geometry. It will not be difficult ...
4
votes
1answer
1k views

Physical meaning of elastic constants of a monoclinic crystal

For the elasticity of a material, Hook's law can be written in tensorial form as: $$\sigma = \mathsf{C}\, \varepsilon$$ where $\sigma$ is the Cauchy stress tensor, $\varepsilon$ is the infinitesimal ...
4
votes
1answer
224 views

What happens when a piezo crystal is exposed to a vacuum?

Application of mechanical stress to a piezo crystal generates a charge. Quoting from wikipedia, a 1 cm3 cube of quartz with 2 kN (500 lbf) of correctly applied force can produce a voltage of 12500 ...
3
votes
1answer
533 views

Why does glass break at the line where you score it?

Why does it take such a small incision for the glass to break at that spot? Why is the structural strength of the material influenced by such a small imperfection?
3
votes
1answer
234 views

Material strain from spacetime curvature

Let's say that you moved an object made of rigid materials into a place with extreme tidal forces. Materials have a modulus of elasticity and a yield strength. Does the corresponding 3D geometric ...
3
votes
1answer
970 views

Formulas for compressibility of solids

I am taking a course in mechanics this semester, as well as a course in reservoir physics. Both courses have sections devoted to pressure/compressibility of solids, but the formulas look slightly ...
3
votes
2answers
458 views

What is the mathematical formulation for buckling?

Argument: Buckling is an engineering concept that can only be applied to thin columns with compressive loading. (Is it possible to) Prove the above sentence right or wrong with mathematical ...
3
votes
1answer
891 views

What causes stress concentration (aka stress risers/raisers) at corners?

I've read a few explanations about why stress concentration occurs at sharp corners but I don't find the explanations intuitive. Can anyone explain it perhaps using an analogy such as atoms "holding ...
3
votes
1answer
185 views

Decomposition of deformation into bend, stretch and twist?

I'm wondering is there any way to decompose the deformation of an object into different components? For example, into stretching, bending and twisting part respectively? The decomposition could be ...
3
votes
1answer
56 views

in Science materials, what is difference b/w E and G?

I'm studying Science Materials on Callister's Materials Science and Engineering: An Introduction. I've never studied Mechanics (except for basic Physics courses), so I was wandering: when talking ...
3
votes
0answers
226 views

Does a thermally expanding torus experience internal stress?

I'm trying to learn continuum mechanics and thermo-mechanics. As we know, heating an object increases the mean atomic distance $a_0$ of the atoms in a rigid body. Let's assume it is a linear elastic ...
2
votes
2answers
290 views

What is the motivation for Mohr's circle?

I am very puzzled by the motivation for Mohr's circle in Wikipedia here. Please, explain why we need something called "Mohr's circle". Use as little words as possible and be precise. Helper questions ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

How does the energy in a standing wave travel beyond a node?

In a standing wave, how does energy travel past a node? It should just get reflected. Assume the case of first overtone and you strike the string at a place. How will energy distribute itself? If it ...
2
votes
1answer
281 views

What is the two dimensional equivalent of a spring?

I'm trying to model isotropic linear elastic deformation in two dimensions. In one dimension, I know that a linear elastic material can be thought of as a spring which obeys Hooke's law $F=-k\Delta ...
2
votes
2answers
95 views

Do all impacts create a wave-like disturbance in the medium through which they travel?

There is a scene in the first Matrix movie, where a helicopter strikes a skyscraper. The most interesting part is the 'slow-motion' bit where, as the helicopter strikes the building, a wave first ...
2
votes
2answers
297 views

It would take an elephant, balanced on a pencil, to break through a sheet of graphene the thickness of Cling Film

I'm currently doing some work on a presentation about graphene, and have come across numerous articles which claim something along the lines of It would take an elephant, balanced on a pencil, to ...
2
votes
2answers
62 views

pure compression or pure traction?

I know that if we are given a stress tensor that is diagonal, the sign on the diagonal entries tell us whether we have traction or compression. Now, imagine that we are given a non diagonal stress ...
2
votes
3answers
416 views

Glass pipe cutting

I want to know how to quickly create the straightest possible breaks in glass pipes I apologise if this is only borderline suitable for a physics forum - I just hope experts with a lot of experience ...
2
votes
1answer
366 views

Poisson effect formula for large deformations

English Wikipedia in the Poisson's ratio article gives an equation for large deformation: $$ \frac{\Delta d}{d}=-1+\frac{1}{\left(1+\dfrac{\Delta L}{L}\right)^\nu} $$ I couldn't find any reference ...
2
votes
1answer
942 views

What is the shear stress of a fluid?

One book defines the shear stress $\tau$ of a (Newtonian) fluid as $$\tau = \eta \frac{\partial v}{\partial r} $$ where $\eta$ is the viscosity. There is not much context, so I've made some guesses. ...
2
votes
2answers
285 views

What is the shape of a clamped bent bar?

How would I figure out the Cartesian graph that describes a bar clamped flat for a length on one end with downward force being applied to the other? I have an idea that the bar will try to average ...
2
votes
1answer
70 views

Why does shape of elements matter in finite elements analysis? [closed]

I have used FEA for a couple of years now, but using it and using it correctly are two different things, safety factor is not the solution to everything. I have the feeling I won't be using it right ...
2
votes
1answer
159 views

Why is $dL = L d\epsilon$?

Let's say there's a random elastic material. It's length is $L$ and it's tensile strain $\epsilon= (L-L_0)/L_0$ Now, when one pulls on it the following is true: $dW_{tot}=FdL =\sigma AdL=\sigma A L ...
2
votes
1answer
63 views

stress work of uniformly deforming continuum

I have a volume which is deforming (using explicit time-integration scheme) uniformly with velocity gradient $L$ and stress tensor $\sigma$. I would like to determine work done by the volume ...
2
votes
2answers
98 views
+50

what is the static pressure in a yield stress fluid?

Suppose I have a tank filled and there is no slip at the walls. If the tank is filled with a Newtonian fluid and is in static equilibrium, we know that the pressure is defined as $p = \rho g z$. But ...
2
votes
2answers
60 views

Is it possible that Cauchy stress be asymmetric?

According to conservation of linear momentum and angular momentum, one can derive that Cauchy stress tensor is symmetric and hence has only 6 independent components. Is it possible that, when breaking ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Stress in a thick-walled pressure vessel

I can find many references that give the stress in the walls of a pressure vessel for spheres and tubes, but they all seem to be limited to a thin-wall approximation. I'll limit my writing here to ...
2
votes
1answer
261 views

Equivalent of the Kirsch Equations for an elliptical rather than circular hole

Is there an equivalent set of closed form equations to the Kirsch Equations but for an elliptical hole rather than a circular hole?
2
votes
1answer
147 views

Is shear elasticity the same as shear modulus?

I've encountered both the terms "shear elasticity" and "shear modulus". Are these the same?
2
votes
1answer
250 views

Is there symmetry in 2d stress tensor in linear elastic fracture mechanics?

Assumptions: Cross terms in strain tensor are defined as equal $\varepsilon_{xy} = \varepsilon_{yx}$. pure mode I crack. Far from crack tip, material is purely elastic and we are way below yield ...
2
votes
1answer
59 views

Hookes Law and Objective Stress Rates

Often, in papers presenting updated Lagrangian simulation methods for solid dynamics, the following procedure for updating the (Cauchy) stress tensor is presented: First, the Cauchy stress tensor is ...
2
votes
0answers
31 views

buckling of tube - shell thickness vs. momentum of inertia optimum

is there any simple formula (perhabs semi emperical, or aproximatively derived model) for buckling of tube under axial compression load given its crossection and wall thickness? ( and naturraly ...
2
votes
0answers
68 views

Stress calculations in a perforated paper

You have a sheet of paper (torn out of a good quality foolscap notebook) as shown above, and you start pulling it apart with both your hands (forces indicating by the blue arrows). Its difficult to ...
2
votes
0answers
220 views

Stresses on an inclined plane

Background This issue has been bothering me for a few days now. It's actually part of my homework, but I've already finished them and in a sense they're not part of the question here. What I would ...
2
votes
0answers
55 views

If I roll an elastic plate into a cylinder, does it shrink?

Suppose I start with a rectangular elastic (to keep things simple, zero Poisson's ratio) sheet of length $2\pi R$, thickness $h$, and (immaterial) width $W$. I roll it up into a cylinder of radius ...
2
votes
1answer
63 views

Potential collapse during an earthquake? [closed]

I was asked to determine the shear forces on 12" diameter table legs supporting a few hundred pounds of static weight. How does one calculate or determine the potential force on the legs and/or ...
2
votes
0answers
243 views

Stress analysis of a cantilever beam using FDM

I am a CSE researcher with a not so in depth background of physics. As a part of my research in object modelling, I am trying to computationally figure out the stress for various objects by using ...
2
votes
0answers
47 views

What diameter is used to calculate stress in an elastomer whose cross sectional area changes continuously when streched?

Consider a cylindrical rope of rubbery elastomer with a radius (in inches) equal to the square root of the inverse of $\pi \rightarrow \sqrt \frac{1}{\pi} $ so that the cross sectional area is $1 \, ...
2
votes
0answers
252 views

Free body diagram of stresses governing fracture propagation in a solid material

Reading this, I can intuitively understand that fractures propagate along the path of least resistance, creating "width in a direction that requires the least force". However, it is less intuitive ...
1
vote
3answers
2k views

What is the difference between stress and pressure?

What is the difference between stress and pressure? Are there any intuitive examples that explain the difference between the two? How about an example of when pressure and stress are not equal?
1
vote
1answer
127 views

Strain and stress tensor

I have problem by definition of strain and stress. From Gockenbach's book that our reference for FEM, we have $$\epsilon=\frac{\nabla u+ \nabla u^T}{2},$$ that $u$ is vector displacement, and ...
1
vote
1answer
270 views

Stresses put through joints on a steel climbing wall

Being a fan of stackoverflow, I thought I could try this question here, hope its not too off topic. I'm wanting to build a free standing climbing wall in my garden and dont know where to start ...
1
vote
2answers
133 views

Electrical analogy for stress and strain

It feels like the relation between stress and strain (and other mechanical properties) is analogous to that of some electrical properties (voltage and current?). I'm comfortable with electrical ...
1
vote
1answer
35 views

Are Normal Stress Differences in Newtonian Fluids Equal?

I was reading about normal stress differences in the context of Non-Newtonian fluids. There was a remark that the normal stress differences in Non-Newtonian fluids are not equal whereas the normal ...