1
vote
1answer
56 views

Liouville's theorem and preservation of topology

What might be a simple proof showing that the time evolution of the phase space volume can't lead to splitting off of the phase space volume? I don't know much about topology and stuff.
2
votes
3answers
129 views

Is thermodynamic free energy and potential energy the same thing?

The equation for free energy $F$ and potential energy $E_{pot}$ are: $$ F=U-TS \\ E_{pot} = E_{tot} -E_{kin} $$ But the temperature $T$ is proportional to the average kinetic energy of a system. So ...
3
votes
3answers
194 views

In what limit do we *really* get Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics from Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac?

Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein energy occupation number $n(\epsilon)$ in natural units ($[T]=[\epsilon]$) read $$n(\epsilon) = \frac{D(\epsilon)}{e^{(\epsilon-\mu)/T}\pm 1},$$ where $D(\epsilon)$ is ...
3
votes
1answer
94 views

Is there a known equation for evolution of classical particle probability density?

Suppose we have some very imprecise knowledge of classical particle's coordinates and momentum: what we can only tell is the probability density to find it in some point of phase space. This is ...
1
vote
2answers
110 views

How are degrees of freedom and energy related in classical theory?

How are degrees of freedom and energy related in classical theory? How do we come to know that each quadratic degree of freedom classically contributes a factor of $\frac{k_{B}T}{2}$.
4
votes
1answer
150 views

Which transformations are canonical?

Which transformations are canonical? Why do canonical transformations preserve the measure of integration in phase space?
1
vote
0answers
86 views

How to formally write down the Boltzmann equation?

Can someone write down the Boltzmann equation, not neglecting any of the variables of the involved functions and integrals? Specifically, how to concisely capture the "primed" variables in a sensible ...
7
votes
1answer
300 views

The virial theorem and a delta function potential

So the virial theorem tells us that: $2\langle T\rangle = \langle \textbf{r}\cdot\nabla V\rangle$. Now I was wondering what would happen if V has te form: $V(\textbf{r}-\textbf{r}') = ...
1
vote
1answer
440 views

Ensemble of harmonic oscillators

I have some problems with problem 2.3 from Reif's Fundamentals of statistical and thermal physics: Consider an ensemble of classical one-dimensional harmonic oscillators. a) If we assume ...
0
votes
0answers
248 views

Can the laws of classical mechanics be derived from quantum mechanics? [duplicate]

Can classical mechanics be derived from quantum mechanics as the same way thermodynamics derived from statistical mechanics?
0
votes
1answer
164 views

Derivation of differential scattering cross section - off-center target

This is a followup question to this pretty good answer regarding deriving the Boltzmann equation. What if the center of the target particle is actually not the same with the scattering center (or may ...
6
votes
1answer
1k views

Derivation of differential scattering cross-section

I'm trying to follow the derivation of the Boltzmann equation in my Theory of Heat script, but have a little trouble understanding the following: The cross-section $d\sigma$ is defined as: The amount ...
2
votes
0answers
109 views

Derivation of impact free Boltzmann equation

When deriving the impact-free boltzmann equation ( $\frac{\partial f}{\partial t} + \vec{v} \cdot\frac{\partial f}{\partial \vec{x}} + \vec{a} \cdot \frac{\partial f}{\partial \vec{v}} = 0$) I have a ...
3
votes
1answer
465 views

Intuition behind classical virial theorem

I am continuing to brush up my statistical physics. I just want to gain a better understanding. I have gone through the derivation of the classical virial theorem once more. I have thought about it, ...
29
votes
4answers
1k views

Is there a Lagrangian formulation of statistical mechanics?

In statistical mechanics, we usually think in terms of the Hamiltonian formalism. At a particular time $t$, the system is in a particular state, where "state" means the generalised coordinates and ...
8
votes
3answers
231 views

Is $k_B \rightarrow 0$ the classical limit of stat. mech., as $\hbar \rightarrow 0$ is in QM?

I hear very often among my peers and seniors that just as how $\hbar\rightarrow0$ takes me to classical mechanics from quantum mechanics, $k_B\rightarrow0$ will take me to classical thermodynamics ...
3
votes
1answer
140 views

Why is the $\langle v_{x}^{2} \rangle=\frac{1}{3} \langle v^2 \rangle$?

For a randomly moving particle. Or, I suppose that 1/3 could generalise to 1/n, where n is the non rotational degrees of freedom for that particle. Related reference Kinetic Theory of Gasses.
4
votes
1answer
256 views

Entropy, flow of informations and fundamental theories

In the hierarchy of theories, first comes hamiltonian theory, from which one deduces kinetics theory, and at last thermodynamics and fluid theories. From a kinetics point of view, entropy and ...
8
votes
7answers
664 views

How does such strange microscopic behavior at the atomic level (quantum mechanics) lead to the macroscopic behavior at our level?

So, I'm only a high school student researching quantum physics, and I find it very interesting. However, there's one question that keeps nagging at me in the back of my head. How exactly do odd ...
8
votes
2answers
397 views

Shaking a jar of balls

A jar is filled with two types of balls, red and green. Red balls have radius $r_1$ and mass $m_1$, green balls have radius $r_2$ and mass $m_2$. If initially the balls are randomly placed throughout ...
4
votes
4answers
659 views

Are the physical laws scale-dependent?

If you read the article "More Is Different", by P.W. Anderson (Science, 4 August 1972), you will find a deep question: are the physical laws dependent of the size of the system under study? As an ...