A model of the basic particles and forces featuring six quarks, three charged leptons, three massless neutral leptons and four fundamental force carrying bosons. The twelve fermions are arranged into three generations, while the bosons serve to explain the electromagnetic interaction plus the strong ...

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4
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1answer
170 views

Is the exact form of the Higgs potential known?

Usually the Higgs potential is given as $$ \frac{1}{2}\mu^2\phi^2 - \frac{1}{4}\lambda^2\phi^4 $$ but I never quite understood if this just serves to give us an idea of how symmetry breaking works, or ...
-4
votes
2answers
40 views

What is the property of neutrino? [on hold]

If mass of a particle is due to Higgs boson, spin is due to Z boson and translational energy is due to photons, what exactly is the innate property of a neutrino? If none exist, is neutrino truly a ...
16
votes
1answer
353 views
+50

Why do we need complex representations in Grand Unified Theories?

EDIT4: I think I was now able to track down where this dogma originally came from. Howard Georgi wrote in TOWARDS A GRAND UNIFIED THEORY OF FLAVOR There is a deeper reason to require ...
2
votes
3answers
83 views

Why are complex fields in the Lagrangian?

I know that a complex field has twice the number of degrees of freedom of a real field, and that fields (in QFT) aren't observables so we don't really care if they are real. But why the need for ...
1
vote
1answer
68 views

Scale invariance in QFT?

I was reading the following paper http://arxiv.org/abs/hep-ph/0703260 for Georgi and I have a conceptual question about it. Howard Georgi was talking about this Unparticle Physics theory and at the ...
1
vote
1answer
76 views

Poincaré' lemma and EM potential $A^{\mu}$

My lecturer said that given the sourceless Maxwell's equations $$ \partial_{\mu}\, ^ *F^{\mu\nu} = 0 $$, we can find a solution $$ F^{\mu\nu} = \partial_{\mu}A_{\nu} - \partial_{\nu}A_{\mu},$$ that ...
1
vote
0answers
16 views

Wu experiment and masses of neutrino

Wu experiment have shown that there are only left-handed neutrinos (and right-handed antineutrinos) take part in weak interactions. My question is about the significance of this experiment in a ...
83
votes
4answers
11k views

Why do electrons, according to my textbook, exist forever?

Does that mean that electrons are infinitely stable? The neutrinos of the three leptons are also listed as having a mean lifespan of infinity.
2
votes
4answers
167 views

What is the difference between the Higgs Boson particle and an electron moving through the Higgs field?

I am watching a lecture by Sean Caroll titled "Particles, Fields, and the Future of Physics". I am not a physicist by any means but enjoy the subject in my spare time hoping to understand it. This ...
8
votes
3answers
884 views

Are electrons just incompletely evaporated black holes?

Imagine a black hole that is fast-approaching its final exponential throws of Hawking evaporation. Presumably, at all points in this end process there there will remain a region that identifiably ...
3
votes
1answer
65 views

Where would the dark matter particle fit inside a picture of the standard model?

While I am particularly fond of the Sterile Neutrino, I have not been able to find any example of a picture of the standard model arrangement of particles, with Dark Matter (and the higgs), inside a ...
0
votes
1answer
81 views

What is the general definition of signal acceptance?

Suppose I have a beyond Standard Model theory and want to test it. I want to test if some experiments, say conduced in LHC, show signals of the theory. In this case, what is "signal acceptance"?
13
votes
4answers
840 views

Origin of lepton/quark generations?

What theoretical explanations exist for the fact that there are three generations of leptons and quarks? I'm not so much asking why there are exactly 3 generations, but rather what makes electron, ...
2
votes
1answer
202 views

Vacuum stability in quantum field theory

What exactly do people mean when they talk about the scale dependence of the effective potential ($V$)? I explain the motivation for my question (and hence my confusion) below. Please correct me as ...
1
vote
1answer
72 views

Is $SU(2)$ really broken by the Higgs VEV or just hidden?

It's generally stated in the textbooks that whent the Higgs field acquires a certain vev the corresponding symmetry is spontaneously broken. For example in A. Zee - QFT in a Nutshell: But none of ...
2
votes
1answer
74 views

Leptogenesis with singlet neutrinos

(i) The Lagrangian of electroweak model extended with right-chiral singlet neutrinos $N_{iR}$ contains the Yukawa coupling term+ the bare Majorana mass term $$f_{\alpha ...
9
votes
3answers
144 views

Why is the “real” gauge group of the standard model $SU(3) \times SU(2) \times U(1) /N$?

In this paper John Baez says the real gauge group of the standard model is $SU(3) \times SU(2) \times U(1) /N$. Can someone explain the logic behind this line of thought? Firstly, does this group ...
5
votes
1answer
332 views

Is color charge a quantum mechanical observable?

If I had 2 pions that were identical, except one was comprised of a red and anti-red, and the other was comprised of a green and anti-green, would I be able to perform an experiment that distinguishes ...
4
votes
3answers
2k views

What is lepton number?

What exactly is a lepton number of a particle? With the charge (eg proton is just 1, not the exact charge), I can understand because it's a physical property, put a particle with charge + next to ...
44
votes
5answers
4k views

Why do we think there are only three generations of fundamental particles?

In the standard model of particle physics, there are three generations of quarks (up/down, strange/charm, and top/bottom), along with three generations of leptons (electron, muon, and tau). All of ...
1
vote
1answer
65 views

Virtual particles and the scaling effect on valence quarks

Inside a proton there are 3 valance quarks. In addition, there is constant creation and annihilation of gluon, quarks and anti-quarks. The number of virtual particles we observe depends on how ...
1
vote
1answer
36 views

Real and virtual photons in the standard model

In the Standard Model, the mass of the photon is zero, while the photon becomes massive if it acts as a mediator between two electrons. Why does this happen? Does it mean that the Standard Model ...
2
votes
3answers
97 views

Discovery of spin-3 particle at LHCb

I just read a discussion on the CERN website regarding first observation of a heavy flavored spin-3 particle at LHCb. This appears to be a post from last July. Is there anyone knowledgeable enough in ...
4
votes
1answer
61 views

Origin of the quark condensate VEV

Consider the QCD lagrangian : $$L_{QCD}=-\frac{1}{4}G^a_{\mu\nu}G^{a\mu\nu}+\sum\bar{\psi}_q(i\not{D}-m_q)\psi_q$$ Textbooks explain that this lagrangian is spontaneously broken by the VEV of quark ...
0
votes
1answer
31 views

Experimental evidence for Z boson coupling to right handed fermions

I do have a question about electro-weak interactions. I know the Z boson is an admixture of two fields, one that couples only to the left-handed part of the fermions (the neutral field introduced to ...
1
vote
0answers
23 views

Do any, all, or no adjustments to standard model change the Weinberg angle or it’s relation to masses or coupling constants?

Do any, all, or no adjustments to standard model change the Weinberg angle or it’s relation to masses or coupling constants? If any, which (types of) ones? For the ones that do, what are the relations ...
3
votes
1answer
43 views

Decay Feynman diagram

$$D^0 \to K^+ +\pi^- + \pi^0 + \pi^0$$ cannot occur by first order weak interactions. Could anybody help me confirm this? What I currently have is that the initial charm goes to anti-strange and the ...
2
votes
1answer
99 views

Free parameters in the Standard Model

From my understanding of the standard model, I understand that there are 19 or 20 free parameters that we need to put in by hand as, and I'm guessing here, there is as yet no theoretical basis for ...
2
votes
0answers
107 views

Why does the electric dipole moment of the electron tell us about its sphericity? [duplicate]

There are a bunch of experiments that claim to show that the electron is highly spherical by measuring the electron electric dipole moment. See e.g.: ...
5
votes
2answers
583 views

Feynman rules for SUSY

This might be an incredibly naive question, but I'm wondering if there are a set of rules for "translating" between Standard Model and SUSY. For instance, if I want want to go from a Standard Model ...
0
votes
0answers
44 views

W boson one loop electroweak contribution to muon g-2

I want to calculate the one loop W boson contribution (triple gauge boson vertex WW-Photon) to the muon anomalous magnetic moment g-2 with the help of Dimensional Regularization. Diagram given below: ...
1
vote
1answer
25 views

CKM matrix - Unitarity triangles

I currently read an article and they mentioned, that using the unitarity relation between the 1. and 3. column of the CKM matrix, one can easily show that the area spanned of the unitarity triangle is ...
3
votes
1answer
89 views

Number $g(T)$ of relativistic degrees of freedom as a function of temperature $T$

Let us consider the total number of relativistic degrees of freedom $g(T)$ for particle species in our universe: $$g(T)=\left(\sum_Bg_B\right)+\frac{7}{8}\left(\sum_Fg_F\right)$$ Where the sums are ...
2
votes
1answer
35 views

How is the the lower-limit of the proton lifetime measured experimentally?

Wikipedia says : Recent experiments at the Super-Kamiokande water Cherenkov radiation detector in Japan gave lower limits for proton half-life, at 90% confidence level, of 6.6×10^33 years via ...
2
votes
2answers
57 views

What are the “generations of matter”?

After a series of clicks on New Scientist and Wikipedia, I ended up on the Wiki article for "generations of matter", and I didn't quite understand it. I believe (and this may be wrong) that different ...
2
votes
0answers
22 views

For Charmonium, why does the spin-spin interaction mostly affect the $L = 0$ states?

For Charmonium, why does the spin-spin interaction mostly affect the $L = 0$ states? My textbook states that this is because "only then is the wave function at the origin non-vanishing". Could anyone ...
0
votes
0answers
64 views

Understanding $ee\to h \to ff$ process

can anyone tell me where to find a good reference that talks about $$e^+ e^-\rightarrow H \rightarrow f\bar{f}$$ where this describes an electron-positron annihilation into a Higgs that in term ...
0
votes
1answer
58 views

Difference between Higgs mechanism and Higgs decay

What is the difference between Higgs Mechanism and Higgs decay? I know that Higgs mechanism is a process which provide the mass to gauge boson. In general, many literature explain Higgs mechanism ...
3
votes
1answer
88 views

About $SU(2)_L \times U(1)_L = U(2)_L $

In the many textbook of standard model, i encounter the relation \begin{align} SU(2)_L \times U(1)_L ~=~ U(2)_L. \end{align} Here $L$ means the left-handness. (It is a physical ...
13
votes
3answers
1k views

What are the alternatives to the Higgs mechanism?

Can someone summarize, with references if possible, all of the alternatives to the simplest model (that requires only a single scalar Higgs field with the Mexican Hat potential) of spontaneous ...
1
vote
1answer
400 views

Why has the Higgs potential the form it has?

The potential for the Higgs field is a quartic one (Mexican hat). Is this done for simplicity or are there fundamental reasons for this choice? I can imagine further contributions to this potential ...
3
votes
3answers
784 views

Why does the Standard Model predict Neutrinos are massless?

Why are neutrinos massless in the Standard Model? Is it connected with experimental fact that neutrinos always have only one direction of projection of spin on motion direction?
0
votes
2answers
99 views

What is the difference between leptons and baryons?

I am learning about the formation of the first atoms and, from what I am reading, before heavy particles, like neutrons and protons could form, there were already other types of particles, called ...
9
votes
3answers
465 views

What's with the very slightly larger mass of the neutron compared to the proton?

Neutron mass: 1.008664 u Proton mass: 1.007276 u Why the discrepancy? On a related note, how does one go about measuring the mass of a neutron or proton, anyway?
2
votes
2answers
58 views

Why are the neutron and proton masses nearly equal? [duplicate]

The neutron to proton mass ratio is nearly one. Is there some fundamental reason from this or this simply a coincidence?
2
votes
2answers
79 views

Selection rule of Kaon decay to pions

in Peskin QFT page 611, he said the isospin change for $${K^0} \to {\pi ^ + }{\pi ^ - }$$ is 1/2, while isospin change for $${K^ + } \to {\pi ^ + }{\pi ^0}$$ is 3/2. Why? If ${I_3}({K^ + }) = ...
2
votes
0answers
29 views

Group theory of quark model [closed]

I am trying to understand the group theoretical aspects of quark model. In chapter 11 - Hypercharge and Strangeness- in the book titled 'Lie Algebras in Particle Physics' by H. Georgi, I am not able ...
3
votes
0answers
59 views

How can we count 17 particles in the standard model

This may be a bit of numerology, but I'd like to be able to make a statement like "There are 17 particles in the standard model" with some logical definition of a particle. But this statement is ...
2
votes
2answers
67 views

Do Standard Model Yukawa couplings depend on the gauge choice?

In the standard model and the Unitary gauge, we write the Higgs field as $ \phi = \frac{1}{\sqrt{2}} \begin{pmatrix} 0 \\ v + H \end{pmatrix}$ and the Yukawa couplings (leaving out the neutrino ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

Antimatter production using normal matter rest mass

Antimatter could be produced by inverse annihilation from kinetic energy of particles. This is, however, not useful to produce any energy. Is there any pathway (like set of reactions between sub ...