A model of the basic particles and forces featuring six quarks, three charged leptons, three massless neutral leptons and four fundamental force carrying bosons. The twelve fermions are arranged into three generations, while the bosons serve to explain the electromagnetic interaction plus the strong ...

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82 views

Applications of quarks or string theory? [closed]

We wouldn't have computers if we didn't know about quantum physics. I understand understanding of general relativity is needed to make GPS work well. Has knowledge of quarks or string theory resulted ...
3
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2answers
159 views

Do any good theories exist on why the weak interaction is so profoundly chiral?

I find the profound asymmetry in the sensitivity of left and right chiral particles to be one of the most remarkable analytical observations captured in the Standard Model. Yet for some, I've not ...
3
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1answer
286 views

Higgs boson in LHC

Recently,the higgs bosons are discovered in LHC. My question is How did they come to know that the particle that are created are actually Higgs boson? On the basis of which properties,they ...
3
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2answers
215 views

If dark matter is a new type of particle, what does that imply?

My understanding is that dark matter cannot be (or is at least highly unlikely to be) an exotic form of any known particle. On the other hand, articles about particle accelerators seem to say that the ...
3
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2answers
422 views

Equation of everything

Is this equation in the image true? Can you give some topics that I can cover the equation.
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3answers
187 views

What barriers exist to prevent us from turning a baryon into a anti-baryon?

At present the only way we can produce anti-matter is through high powered collisions. New matter is created from the energy produced in these collisions and some of them are anti-matter particles ...
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4answers
700 views

If the electron is point like, then what is the significance of the classical radius of the electron?

What is the physical meaning/significance of the classical radius of the electron if we know from experiments that the electron is point like? Is there similarly a classical radius of the photon? The ...
3
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3answers
723 views

Building the meson octet and singlet

I am very lost in this topic. I understand that there are $3\times 3$ possible combinations of a quark and an anti-quark, but why should one decide arbitrarily (that's how it appears to me) that one ...
3
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3answers
122 views

Trilinear gauge couplings: Spin

In non-abelian gauge theories self interaction of gauge fields is permitted, allowing coupling such as $WWZ$ (i.e. $Z$-boson decaying to $W^+W^-$) or ggg (i.e. gluon splitting into two new gluons). ...
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2answers
382 views

What is difference between the different 'flavours' of neutrinos?

Moreover, how-come scientist know that muon-neutrino are different from electron-neutrino when they didn't even know what the difference was? Did they interact differently with other particles?
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1answer
71 views

Effective theories and dimension six operators

What is the importance of dimension six operators in the study of physics beyond the Standard Model? Are these operators more relevant than dimension five operators like $HHFF$ or operators with ...
3
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2answers
212 views

Why do we have a TeV scale?

When model building we don't want to introduce any new scales into our theory. We usually try to have new particles at the Higgs (TeV) scale (to solve the hierarchy problem), at the GUT scale, or at ...
3
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1answer
96 views

Would the Standard Model allow two energetic photons to form a particle-like, zero-spin resonance?

The title is the question: Would the Standard Model allow two energetic photons to form a particle-like, zero-spin resonance?
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2answers
1k views

Are quarks and leptons actually fundamental particles? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What are quarks made of? Are quarks and leptons actually fundamental, or are they made up of even more fundamental particles? And is it true that many consider quarks ...
3
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2answers
147 views

Playground of Forces

Why is it that the gravitational force acts on large sized objects while the strong and weak nuclear forces act at subatomic levels only? What is that stops each other to enter each others domain?
3
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1answer
710 views

What's the Standard Model width of a 125 GeV Higgs?

There's a fairly broad mass spread in the new results out of Atlas and CMS. I'm curious how this fits with the expected SM width.
3
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1answer
57 views

Majorana Mass For Neutrinos In Standard Model

Neutrinos can't be given Dirac masses because there is no $SU(2)_L$ singlet right handed neutrinos in the standard model. But can neutrinos be given Majorana masses in the standard model? EDIT: Why ...
3
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1answer
72 views

Why did it take a long time to discover top quark?

In high school physics, I learned that it took a long time before the top quark was discovered. One of the reasons that was given in my book was that the top quark has a large mass, much larger than ...
3
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1answer
74 views

How do we know that weak isospin is an exact symmetry while strong isospin is not?

It is said in textbooks that if the $SU(2)_f$ or $SU(3)_f$ flavor symmetry were exact for sstrong isospin, then all members of the multiplets would be exactly equally massive. By looking at quark ...
3
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1answer
282 views

What breaks the symmetry between the electromagnetic and weak nuclear force?

I know the electromagnetic force is mediated by a photon and the weak nuclear force is mediated by two massive bosons. Are there any other insights into why the masses are so different?
3
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2answers
152 views

Simulating a proton

How much computing power would it take to simulate a single proton from the bottom up, without taking any shortcuts whatsoever? My current understanding is that: A proton is basically a seething ...
3
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1answer
231 views

If LHC searches of a Higgs boson won't be a success, what consequences for the theory of electroweak interaction it can bear?

Whether it is necessary to search still for variants of an explanation of spontaneously breaking gauge symmetry, giving masses for a W, Z-bosons? Goldstone bosons are bosons that appear necessarily ...
3
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1answer
425 views

Why does the Higgs field only couple to opposite-chiralities fermions?

According to the Wikipedia page on the Standard Model, the Higgs field interact with fermions through a Yukawa interaction coupling only left to right chiralities. What is the reason for that? Is that ...
3
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1answer
130 views

Rigorous mathematical formalism of particle physics

Can anyone provide me with a rigorous mathematical definition of the fundamental particles (all fundamental bosons and fermions), reflecting the analogy of action of groups with interaction of ...
3
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1answer
34 views

Renormalizing with external momenta set to zero

I've often seen in textbooks that authors renormalize diagrams by setting external momentum to zero. Under what conditions is this justified? An example of this is done in Manohar and Wise's book on ...
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2answers
112 views

What exactly is the weak portion of the SM gauge group?

This Wikipedia article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Left%E2%80%93right_symmetry states that the weak part of the SM gauge group is not $SU(2)_L \times U(1)_Y$ but $ \frac{ SU(2)_L \times ...
3
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1answer
230 views

Why should the mass of leptons to be near of proton and QCD/chiral scales?

The mistery of the mass of the top being in the electroweak scale can be justified by the Higgs mechanism itself; in some sense the top mass is the only "natural" mass, the other masses of fermions ...
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27 views

flavor splitting of quark masses

It seems pretty clear that flavor symmetry splits the quark masses. It seems extremely odd that a global gauge symmetry of the Standard Model fields could or would produce such extreme splitting as ...
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0answers
78 views

Anomaly cancellation and fermion number violation

In the standard model, an axial $SU(3)$ currents has anomaly which after quantization leads to the fermion number violation. However, taking all the fermions into account we note that the anomalies ...
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0answers
209 views

How to understand the QED, QCD and standard model Lagrangians? [closed]

How do you read the QED, QCD and standard model Lagrangians? What do all the symbols and tensors represent? And, how can you derive them by yourselves?
3
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0answers
76 views

Were fermions ever massless?

In a discussion of the Standard model and Higgs mechanism it was claimed that accordingly: "During an early phase of the cosmos all fermions were massless." I wonder whether this claim can be ...
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0answers
97 views

List of cross sections?

Sometimes I need to look up a certain cross section, say the inclusive Z production cross section at $\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV. Is there a place where 'all the' cross sections are tabulated ...
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0answers
117 views

How can one activate the decay of the quark b with PYTHIA event generator?

This is my problem and I hope finding a solution. _In the simplest alternative, MSTJ(22) = 2, the comparison is based on the average lifetime, or rather (c*tau "time life") , measured in mm. Thus ...
3
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0answers
108 views

How does one place QFT's reality in context with that of other areas of physics? [closed]

Okay, so I'm learning some QFT, I read through Bogoliubov, Shirkov Introduction to Quantized Fields up to the section on renormalization, and then wanted to see a more modern point of view- so I ...
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4answers
3k views

Why is Neutron Heavier than Proton? [closed]

This is Neutron decay: $$n^o \to p^+ + e^- + \overline {\nu_e}.$$ and this is proton one: $$p^+ \to n^o + e^+ + \nu_e$$ so when the $e^+ =e^-$ and $\nu_e=\overline {\nu_e}$ why $n \not= p$? my ...
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4answers
218 views

Computer Science Modeling of Physical World

I am curious what efforts have been made to date to define virtual computer worlds based on the physics we know in the real world? I think it would be awesome to say start off with an atom defining ...
2
votes
2answers
301 views

Some very basic questions on the Higgs Boson

What exactly is a boson? Is the Higgs boson the cause of gravity or a result of it? Does the collision of particles at the LHC create a gravity field or waves or somehow interact with the gravity ...
2
votes
1answer
370 views

Why some particles interact with the Higgs field and others don't?

Why some particles interact with the Higgs field and others don't? Higgs doesn't explain that much: why some particles have mass and others don't? is like why some particles interact with the Higgs ...
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5answers
364 views

Could Quark model turn out to be false?

Quarks combine to form composite particles called hadrons, the most stable of which are protons and neutrons, the components of atomic nuclei. Due to a phenomenon known as color confinement, quarks ...
2
votes
2answers
279 views

Might the LHC see nothing new at all?

There's no guarantee that supersymmetry (or more exotic new physics) will be seen at the LHC. Meanwhile, it's standard lore that a Higgsless standard model becomes nonunitary somewhere in the vicinity ...
2
votes
1answer
195 views

Is Higgs mechanism necessary in QCD?

As we known, we introduce Higgs mechanism into Standard model to explain mass of Gauge boson, lepton and neutrino(maybe?). Higgs mechanism is necessary for electroweak theory because gauge symmetry ...
2
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2answers
106 views

Charges of quarks and leptons

Are there any theoretical restrictions within the framework of QFT that fix the relative sign between charged leptons and up-type quarks? We know that in our universe, they have opposite signs -- ...
2
votes
1answer
241 views

What is meant by the rest energy of non-composite particle?

When talking about the rest energy of a composite particle such as a proton, part of the rest energy is accounted for by the internal kinetic energy of its constituent quarks. But what is physically ...
2
votes
1answer
312 views

Why are the quarks so named?

Quarks have a variety of names (or flavours): Up Down Strange Charm Bottom or Beauty Top or Truth Why do they have such odd names?
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1answer
71 views

What is the difference between a QCD “glue ball” and a Higgs Boson?

Although they have never been observed, theoretically gluons can exist outside of the nucleus of an atom in the form of a "glue ball". Since the predominant mechanism of Higgs creation at the LHC was ...
2
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2answers
243 views

Fermion Field of Standard Model

Why fermion field is treated as anti-commuting and boson field as truly classical in standard model?
2
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1answer
164 views

Similar masses and lifetimes of the $\Delta$ baryons

Why do the four spin 3/2 $\Delta$ baryons have nearly identical masses and lifetimes despite their very different $u$ and $d$ quark compositions?
2
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1answer
202 views

Do neutrinos 'become' other types of particles between oscillations?

In light of the recent kurfuffle of FTL neutrinos I wonder, do neutrinos 'become' other particles between their oscillations between the different flavors of neutrino? I'm slightly familiar with ...
2
votes
3answers
176 views

why cannot fermions have non-zero vacuum expectation value?

In quantum field theory, scalar can take non-zero vacuum expectation value(vev). And this way they break symmetry of the Lagrangian. Now my question is what will happen if the fermions in the theory ...
2
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1answer
93 views

Does the decay of the Higgs Boson create up or down quarks?

Does the decay of the Higgs Boson create up or down quarks?