A model of the basic particles and forces featuring six quarks, three charged leptons, three massless neutral leptons and four fundamental force carrying bosons. The twelve fermions are arranged into three generations, while the bosons serve to explain the electromagnetic interaction plus the strong ...

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What is a quark condensate?

What is a quark condensate? is it a bound state between 2 quarks? can we have 3(or more)-quarks condensate? What mediates the interaction between the constituents of the condensate? Are the ...
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Left and Right-handed fermions

Is there a simple intuitive way to understand the difference between left-handed and right-handed fermions (electrons say)? How to experimentally distinguish between them?
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243 views

Particles mass determined by SO(D-2) vs SO(D-1)

I've recently come across this statement that massless particles arise from $SO(D-2)$ symetry and massive particles from $SO(D-1)$. I would have guessed that it would be the exact opposite way, but ...
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How does one place QFT's reality in context with that of other areas of physics? [closed]

Okay, so I'm learning some QFT, I read through Bogoliubov, Shirkov Introduction to Quantized Fields up to the section on renormalization, and then wanted to see a more modern point of view- so I ...
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Why does the weak force distinguish left and right handedness?

I'm wondering why the weak interaction only affects left-handed particles (and right-handed antiparticles). Before someone says "because thats just the way nature is" :-), let me explain what I find ...
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The Higgs field a new Luminiferous aether?

As of this writing it has been made clear to me that classical physics' Luminiferous aether was a terriblly poor discriptor of space. With the advent of Special Relativity and General Relativity, that ...
5
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275 views

Why are WW gg ττ branching ratios so similar for a 115 GeV SM Higgs?

In a previous question on Higgs branching ratios, I find this image (originally from page 15 here). I am VERY intrigued by the fact that decays to WW, gg, and ττ are almost equally probable, for ...
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2answers
291 views

Might the LHC see nothing new at all?

There's no guarantee that supersymmetry (or more exotic new physics) will be seen at the LHC. Meanwhile, it's standard lore that a Higgsless standard model becomes nonunitary somewhere in the vicinity ...
8
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1answer
768 views

Do color-neutral gluons exist?

If I'm correct a quark can change color by emitting a gluon. For example a blue up quark $u_b$ can change into a red up quark by emitting a gluon: $$u_b \longrightarrow u_r + g_{b\overline{r}}$$ ...
8
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258 views

Is there literature on a continuous mass spectrum for the Higgs field?

Various masses for the Higgs field are compatible with experiment, but is it possible that the Higgs field is not observable because it has a continuous mass spectrum? Work in the 60s and 70s on free ...
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2answers
431 views

Is the Higgs 3/4 detected already?

Can someone provide an expanded explanation on the statement that the Higgs field is already 3/4 detected? Link to ref (@nic, sorry I left it off, do a quick search on Higgs to find the right ...
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1answer
85 views

Fine tuning and parametric modelings

When I perform parametric modeling, if there is significant multicollinearity between variables I think should be independent, but in fact are not, I run into the case where one or more of the ...
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1answer
264 views

How is fine tuning of standard model conceptual different than the fine tuning of PI?

If I were to try to find pi using a ruler and a compass, I would first try to find out how many rational line segments of the diameter I could fit around the interior circumference and then continue ...
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191 views

Chiral fermions from torsion flux in M-theory?

Witten's 1981 paper "Search for a realistic Kaluza-Klein theory" is frequently cited for its observation that, in a compactification of d=11 supergravity on a manifold with SU(3) x SU(2) x U(1) ...
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197 views

Does the Standard model allow for radioactive decay prediction? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Predicting Decay Rates via the Standard Model More specifically, does (any) current theory allow for approximate or exact predictions of atomic decay rates and types ...
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2answers
242 views

If dark matter is a new type of particle, what does that imply?

My understanding is that dark matter cannot be (or is at least highly unlikely to be) an exotic form of any known particle. On the other hand, articles about particle accelerators seem to say that the ...
4
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1answer
605 views

Detection of W and Z bosons

What specific behaviour confirmed the existence of the W and Z bosons at the UA1 and UA2 experiments? Thanks!
3
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1answer
664 views

What is the most natural definition of the weak hypercharge coupling constant if grand unification is wrong?

A tricky question. Here is the famous graph of the running of the three coupling constants in the standard model: The graph shows, in its top curve, the running of the coupling constant $\alpha_1$. ...
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495 views

strange modulation of radiactive decay rates with solar activity

Recently i found out this uber strange article about nuclear decay rates being somehow showing seasonal variations with a high correlation with sun activity. Two very precise questions: 1) has this ...
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2answers
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115 GeV, 170 GeV, and the noncommutative standard model

Several years ago, noncommutative geometry was used to describe the standard model, somehow yielding a prediction of 170 GeV for the mass of the Higgs boson, a prediction which was falsified a few ...
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2answers
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What is the difference between 'running' and 'current' quark mass?

When looking at the PDG, there is a difference between the 'running' and the 'current' quark masses. Does anyone know which is the difference between these two?
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2answers
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Did the researchers at Fermilab find a fifth force?

Please consider the publication Invariant Mass Distribution of Jet Pairs Produced in Association with a W boson in $p\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV by the CDF-Collaboration, ...
4
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2answers
779 views

Predicting Decay Rates via the Standard Model

Question 7584 illustrated a procedure to forecast the decay rates of isotopes with known long average lifetimes. Lifetimes of the many U isotopes vary from micoseconds to gigayears. F has only one ...
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434 views

Gravity and the Standard Model

Gravity is ignored in the SM. The proton rest mass is ~0.938 GeV/$c^2$. LHC protons will move with 7 TeV energy, presumably with a relativistic mass about 7,450 times rest mass. A cosmic ray with the ...
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4answers
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Is there an accepted analogy/conceptual aid for the Higgs field?

Is there an accepted analogy / conceptual aid for the Higgs field? In Physics there are many accepted conceptual aids such as * Schrödinger's cat * Maxwell's Demon * I'm sure I'm missing ...
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1answer
355 views

Why should the mass of leptons to be near of proton and QCD/chiral scales?

The mystery of the mass of the top being in the electroweak scale can be justified by the Higgs mechanism itself; in some sense the top mass is the only "natural" mass, the other masses of fermions ...
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Why are neutrino oscillations considered to be “beyond the Standard Model”?

Is this just a historical artifact - that the particle physics community decided at some point to call all of the pre-oscillation physics by the name the "Standard Model"? The reason I ask is because ...
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3answers
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What are the alternatives to the Higgs mechanism?

Can someone summarize, with references if possible, all of the alternatives to the simplest model (that requires only a single scalar Higgs field with the Mexican Hat potential) of spontaneous ...
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4answers
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What is the need for the Higgs mechanism and electroweak unification?

The Higgs mechanism allows massless fields to acquire mass through their coupling to a scalar field. But if the masses cannot be predicted because the couplings have to be fixed, what really is the ...
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3answers
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Are W & Z bosons virtual or not?

W and Z bosons are observed/discovered. But as force carrying bosons they should be virtual particles, unobservable? And also they require to have mass, but if they are virtual they may be off-shell, ...
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Other possible theories (other than string theory) which are generalizations of the standard model with incorporation of gravity

The only finite mathematical framework that incorporates both the standard model of particle physics and gravity under one umbrella that I am aware of is string theory. I would like to know whether ...
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Why should the Standard Model be renormalizable?

Effective theories like Little Higgs models or Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model are non-renormalizable and there is no problem with it, since an effective theory does not need to be renormalizable. These ...
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3answers
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Shape of the Higgs branching ratio to ZZ

I've been looking at the, now very popular, graph of the SM Higgs decay branching ratios: You see that the ZZ branching ratio has a funny dip around the $170\, GeV$, very different from the WW ...
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338 views

Is there a relationship between Berry-Pancharatnam phase and CP violation in quark mixing?

Berry-Pancharatnam phase is the phase that quantum systems exhibit when they pass through a sequence of states and return to their original state. It's a complex phase and it is different from the ...
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863 views

Why do leptons and quarks mix?

Is the fact that weak eigenstates are not mass eigenstates completely arbitrary? Or is there a deeper reason for the existence of the PMNS and CKM matrices?
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3answers
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How can neutrinos oscillate though the lepton flavors have differing masses?

Since the total mass-energy for the neutrino presumably does not change when a neutrino changes lepton flavor, though the mass is different, what compensates for the gain or loss of mass? Does the ...
5
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2answers
657 views

“Space” in General Relativity and “vacuum” in Standard Model, is it the same thing?

And expansion of space is equal to expansion of vacuum?
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What Do We Get From Having Higher Generations of Particles?

Background: I have written a pop-science book explaining quantum mechanics through imaginary conversations with my dog-- the dog serves as a sort of reader surrogate, popping in occasionally to ask ...
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4answers
490 views

Weak contribution to nuclear binding

Does the weak nuclear force play a role (positive or negative) in nuclear binding? Normally you only see discussions about weak decay and flavour changing physics, but is there a contribution to ...
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5answers
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Why do we think there are only three generations of fundamental particles?

In the standard model of particle physics, there are three generations of quarks (up/down, strange/charm, and top/bottom), along with three generations of leptons (electron, muon, and tau). All of ...
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1answer
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Why are there 3 quarks in a proton? [closed]

A few quark related questions (I don't know much about them other than that there are 2 flavors concerning protons and neutrons). Why are there 3 quarks in a proton or neutron? Why not 2 or 4? Is ...
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Why are quark types known as flavors?

There are six types of quarks, known as flavors. Why where these types called flavors? Why do the flavors have such odd names (up, down, charm, strange, top, and bottom)?
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2answers
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Book for particles physics [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Particle physics getting started I'm looking for a book that introduces the building blocks refer to the standard model for a course in nuclear physics. There are good ...
27
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5answers
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Could gravity be an emergent property of nature?

Sorry if this question is naive. It is just a curiosity that I have. Are there theoretical or experimental reasons why gravity should not be an emergent property of nature? Assume a standard model ...
8
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2answers
638 views

Do current models of particle physics explain the chemical properties of elements/compounds?

I have a particle system of seven protons and seven (or sometimes eight) neutrons (each formed by their appropriate quarks, etc.) bound together in a state that can be macroscopically described as a ...
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4answers
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What is needed to claim the discovery of the Higgs boson?

As I understand the Higg's boson can be discovered by the LHC because the collisions are done at an energy that is high enough to produce it and because the luminosity will be high enough also. But ...
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2answers
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If the LHC doesn't find the Higgs Boson, what would be the implications for the Standard Model?

What would be the implications to the Standard Model if the Higgs Boson hadn't been found with the LHC? Also, if the Higgs Boson had not been found with the LHC, would it have been successfully ...
10
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3answers
547 views

What's with the very slightly larger mass of the neutron compared to the proton?

Neutron mass: 1.008664 u Proton mass: 1.007276 u Why the discrepancy? On a related note, how does one go about measuring the mass of a neutron or proton, anyway?