A model of the basic particles and forces featuring six quarks, three charged leptons, three massless neutral leptons and four fundamental force carrying bosons. The twelve fermions are arranged into three generations, while the bosons serve to explain the electromagnetic interaction plus the strong ...

learn more… | top users | synonyms

1
vote
0answers
100 views

Masses of all the particles in the Standard Theory [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: If photons have no mass, how can they have momentum? I'm sure this question has been asked here before but I wasn't able to find it clearly answered in one q/a session. ...
21
votes
5answers
3k views

Why should the Standard Model be renormalizable?

Effective theories like Little Higgs models or Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model are non-renormalizable and there is no problem with it, since an effective theory does not need to be renormalizable. These ...
8
votes
1answer
258 views

Is there literature on a continuous mass spectrum for the Higgs field?

Various masses for the Higgs field are compatible with experiment, but is it possible that the Higgs field is not observable because it has a continuous mass spectrum? Work in the 60s and 70s on free ...
7
votes
2answers
239 views

Particles mass determined by SO(D-2) vs SO(D-1)

I've recently come across this statement that massless particles arise from $SO(D-2)$ symetry and massive particles from $SO(D-1)$. I would have guessed that it would be the exact opposite way, but ...
3
votes
0answers
130 views

How does one place QFT's reality in context with that of other areas of physics? [closed]

Okay, so I'm learning some QFT, I read through Bogoliubov, Shirkov Introduction to Quantized Fields up to the section on renormalization, and then wanted to see a more modern point of view- so I ...
2
votes
2answers
291 views

Might the LHC see nothing new at all?

There's no guarantee that supersymmetry (or more exotic new physics) will be seen at the LHC. Meanwhile, it's standard lore that a Higgsless standard model becomes nonunitary somewhere in the vicinity ...
1
vote
1answer
85 views

Fine tuning and parametric modelings

When I perform parametric modeling, if there is significant multicollinearity between variables I think should be independent, but in fact are not, I run into the case where one or more of the ...
0
votes
1answer
264 views

How is fine tuning of standard model conceptual different than the fine tuning of PI?

If I were to try to find pi using a ruler and a compass, I would first try to find out how many rational line segments of the diameter I could fit around the interior circumference and then continue ...
0
votes
0answers
197 views

Does the Standard model allow for radioactive decay prediction? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Predicting Decay Rates via the Standard Model More specifically, does (any) current theory allow for approximate or exact predictions of atomic decay rates and types ...
4
votes
1answer
590 views

Detection of W and Z bosons

What specific behaviour confirmed the existence of the W and Z bosons at the UA1 and UA2 experiments? Thanks!
3
votes
2answers
242 views

If dark matter is a new type of particle, what does that imply?

My understanding is that dark matter cannot be (or is at least highly unlikely to be) an exotic form of any known particle. On the other hand, articles about particle accelerators seem to say that the ...
36
votes
4answers
2k views

What is needed to claim the discovery of the Higgs boson?

As I understand the Higg's boson can be discovered by the LHC because the collisions are done at an energy that is high enough to produce it and because the luminosity will be high enough also. But ...
4
votes
2answers
767 views

Predicting Decay Rates via the Standard Model

Question 7584 illustrated a procedure to forecast the decay rates of isotopes with known long average lifetimes. Lifetimes of the many U isotopes vary from micoseconds to gigayears. F has only one ...
1
vote
2answers
433 views

Gravity and the Standard Model

Gravity is ignored in the SM. The proton rest mass is ~0.938 GeV/$c^2$. LHC protons will move with 7 TeV energy, presumably with a relativistic mass about 7,450 times rest mass. A cosmic ray with the ...
12
votes
3answers
2k views

Why are quark types known as flavors?

There are six types of quarks, known as flavors. Why where these types called flavors? Why do the flavors have such odd names (up, down, charm, strange, top, and bottom)?
2
votes
2answers
337 views

Is there a relationship between Berry-Pancharatnam phase and CP violation in quark mixing?

Berry-Pancharatnam phase is the phase that quantum systems exhibit when they pass through a sequence of states and return to their original state. It's a complex phase and it is different from the ...
8
votes
2answers
628 views

Do current models of particle physics explain the chemical properties of elements/compounds?

I have a particle system of seven protons and seven (or sometimes eight) neutrons (each formed by their appropriate quarks, etc.) bound together in a state that can be macroscopically described as a ...