An object such as a metal coil or air-filled tube which provides a force opposing the direction of deformation.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

2
votes
3answers
295 views

Can friction change the resonance frequency of a system?

I am simulating the transient response of a mass-spring-damping system with friction. The excitation is given in the form of a base acceleration. What I am not sure about is: can the friction change ...
0
votes
1answer
141 views

Speed of waves in a spring

I recently bought a small Slinky spring so as to observe the speed of a wave along its length. I stretched it out quite tightly in a HORIZONTAL position on a spring holder and then plucked at it on ...
-1
votes
1answer
60 views

Change in F vs x graph if spring is torn in half? [duplicate]

The force required to stretch a spring varies with the distance as shown in the figure. If the experiment is performed with the above spring of half the length, the line OA will: (a) shift toward F-...
0
votes
1answer
324 views

Spring-block system, simple harmonic motion, time period

In the case of simple harmonic motion of spring block system, why time period of the simple harmonic motion of the block is independent of acceleration of the system (spring-block system)?
1
vote
1answer
62 views

Distance between coils on a massive spring

I'm trying to calculate the separation between coils on a massive spring with no weights attached under different conditions. I will present my solution to the problem in the case of a uniform ...
0
votes
2answers
232 views

Relation of spring constant with mean radius of spring

My teacher says that spring constant depends on its radius. I tried to understand it, and checked many questions in this site and other sites. All of them say that spring constant depends on number of ...
3
votes
1answer
142 views

Coupled differential equations: how to write in terms of only one coordinate? [closed]

I have a mass-spring system, which is as follows:                          ...
1
vote
1answer
55 views

Gravitational PE lost v Elastic PE gained in mass - spring

If a spring has a load $m$ added to it (and so is extended by $x$), the gravitational potential energy lost by the mass will be $mgx$. The elastic potential energy gained by the spring is $\frac{1}{2}\...
2
votes
3answers
124 views

What has the potential energy: the spring or the body on the spring?

Particles have gravitational potential energy due to its position in the gravitational field. We say the particle has potential energy and not the Earth (the body doing the work). Why is it not the ...
1
vote
1answer
163 views

How to Determine Viscosity using Damped Oscillations? [closed]

How does one find out the viscosity of a fluid, using viscous damping of an oscillating spring? Any help would be greatly appreciated.
0
votes
3answers
112 views

Compression of spring when an object of given mass is placed on it

A question in my textbook says - A block of mass $m$ is released from rest onto an ideal non deformed spring from a negligible height. Neglecting air resistance, find compression $x$ of the spring. ...
0
votes
1answer
84 views

How to set up equations of forces for 3 springs connected to each other in an elevator?

In the above diagram the elevator is moving downward with acceleration $a_E$ and velocity $v_E$. All 3 masses are given as $m1,m2,m3$. The question is how much has the middle spring stretched from ...
1
vote
1answer
329 views

2D Mass Spring System - Where does $m_3$ go to?

I am struggling to frame proper equations for the following two-dimensional mass spring System: 1D Model Basics first: I started with a simple one-dimensional mass-spring System to model something ...
3
votes
2answers
723 views

Estimate for energy dissipated by a damper/dashpot

I have a system with a mass $m$ attached to the end of a cable. The cable mass is assumed negligible. The cable is attached to the ground at the one end while the other, with the attached mass $m$, ...
3
votes
3answers
428 views

How to apply Newton's Third law when a massless spring is compressed by a moving block?

I was really confused about the applicability of Newton's Third Law in case of non-rigid bodies like springs. While googling about this I read that Newton's Third Law fails in case of springs. I saw ...
0
votes
1answer
245 views

Momentum is conserved without the application of Newton's third law in cases of non-rigid bodies like spring

Let a spring be attached with a block moving with $v_1$; when another block with velocity $v_2(v_2 \gt v_1)$ hits the spring from the rear end, the spring gets compressed until both the blocks have ...
-1
votes
1answer
115 views

Differentiating displacement with respect to speed in order to obtain time

I have this problem where I am trying to calculate $d(t)$ and $v(t)$ of a mass m on a spring, dropped from a displacement $A$, without using anything else than Hooke's law and energy calculations. ...
0
votes
2answers
40 views

How does my reference point affect the regresion of data about Hooke's law?

A vertical spring is used (subject to a universal support) whose length is $20$ $cm$ when no force is acting on it. We put on a weight of $1$ $N$ and the new length is $22$ $cm$. When writing the data ...
5
votes
2answers
196 views

Maximum reading after dropping a mass onto a scale

If one drops an object onto a scale, the needle will temporarily spike to a high reading. Given a mass $m$ dropped from a height $h$ above a spring scale, is there a good way to approximate what the ...
0
votes
1answer
200 views

Calculate Spring Constant [closed]

I am editing the question because it was misunderstood to be a homeowrk question. I am modeling a Stumps equipment for a game called Cricket.Typically the game consists of 3 wooden stumps ...
0
votes
0answers
58 views

Is it wrong to equate the net force to the force by the spring to find its maximum expansion?

In the picture displayed here , I have two blocks of masses m1 and m2. They are connected by a spring and a leftward force is applied on the block of mass m1.This will , ofcourse , result in expansion ...
1
vote
1answer
58 views

Extension spring and permanent damage

Is there a way to calculate how far an extension spring can be extended before it suffers permanent damage? There are some online calculators, but how are they done? This calculator is the most ...
0
votes
1answer
292 views

Harmonic oscillator :Two masses are attached to one unfixed spring from both sides (vertically) [closed]

while ($t<0$) the system is still ($\Sigma$ F=0). Mass $m_2$ is held while $t<0$. Mass $m_1$ is located $h_0$ meters above the ground and the spring is currently stretched $L$ meters. The spring'...
0
votes
5answers
4k views

Pulley system: how can tensions be equal throughout a entire rope if the weights on opposite ends are different? [duplicate]

More weight means more pulling force, and thus more tension force. Like this answer says, however much force you pulling with is equal in magnitude to the tension force. If that is case, how then ...
1
vote
2answers
249 views

Hooke's Law and Simple Harmonic Motion

Can anyone explain how the following formula is derived and what it means? $$x'' = -n^2x $$ I was reading through my high school physics textbook and I stumbled upon a section on Hooke's Law. It says ...
0
votes
2answers
87 views

Does the spring effect a moving ball? [closed]

There is a ball attached to spring which is streched out. The ball is held by a machine on the ground so it does not move, but when it is released it will quickly contract. At the same time a ...
-1
votes
3answers
210 views

Figure out the force constant of a spring [closed]

You are asked to design spring bumpers for the walls of a parking garage. A freely rolling 1200-kg var moving at 0.65m/s is to compress the spring no more than 0.090m before stopping. What should be ...
5
votes
3answers
347 views

Is it true that spring has more force acting on it at its positive maximum amplitude than than at the negative one?

Am I missing something? It seems obvious to me that at $+A$ and $-A$, the spring has restorative forces equal in magnitude but opposite in direction. But since gravity is always pulling it down, ...