0
votes
0answers
21 views

Question about two masses connected by a spring [duplicate]

I have two masses connected by a spring. They are horizontal and are not affected by friction or gravity. The spring's stiffness constant is $k$, and $x_1$ and $x_2$ are the displacements of the ...
1
vote
1answer
155 views

Modeling a 2-dimensional mass spring system

First of all, I am unfortunately not an expert in physics, so please be indulge with me. I am trying to model a $2$-dimensional mass-spring system with $1$ mass and $3$ springs to solve a dynamics ...
2
votes
0answers
36 views

Can I use the reduced mass principle in a spring-damper system?

http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/orbv.html#rm I want to know, if I can use the reduced mass principle to solve a two object spring-damper system. In the books and webpages that I have ...
0
votes
2answers
106 views

How to estimate a person's mass from a sensor? [closed]

I'm trying to estimate the person's weight from some available sensors and I have an accelerometer, a gyrometer and a magnetometer. The triaxial accelerometer is fixed in a band in the person's ...
0
votes
1answer
73 views

Period of oscilation [duplicate]

Two masses $m_1$ and $m_2$ are connected by a spring of spring constant $k$ and slide freely without friction along horizontal track. What is period of oscillation? No force influence.
3
votes
2answers
4k views

Modeling a two-mass, spring, damper system

I'm trying to model a system with two masses, two springs, two dampers, and one applied force using transfer functions. I'll then be inputting it into Simulink. The system looks like this but there ...
0
votes
1answer
384 views

Mass points of a Mass-spring model

Let's say I have a mass spring model like the one in the picture below: So, there are 3 parts of the spring joined together in an equilateral triangular manner. Each of the joints has a mass of ...
0
votes
1answer
233 views

Question about finding $k$ in Hooke's Law

My textbook (Advanced Engineering Mathematics by Dennis Zill) offers the following explanation of Hooke's Law: By Hooke's Law, the spring itself exerts a restoring force $F$ opposite to the ...