Fundamental characteristic property of particles which together with orbital angular momentum acts as the generator of rotations and which doesn't have a classical equivalent but is sometimes compared to and contrasted with classical intrinsic angular momentum.

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Experimental realization of Quantum Teleportation of Spin, not polarization, not ions or atoms

I've looked everywhere in databases my school provides, to google searches, to the questions asked in physics forums, and here. As I understand, the original QT (quantum teleportation) protocol ...
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206 views

Normalization of a spin-like quantity in matrix mechanics

Suppose that there is a quantity in Heisenberg picture as the following: $A=u_1\Sigma_1 + u_2\Sigma_2 +u_3\Sigma_3$ I am not sure why $u_1,u_2,u_3$ is normalized to be ${u_1}^2 + {u_2}^2 + {u_3}^2 ...
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142 views

Can experiment distinguish the basis in which a singlet state is represented?

Let $\left(|\uparrow\rangle,|\downarrow\rangle\right)$ and $\left(|\nearrow\rangle,|\swarrow\rangle\right)$ be two bases of the $2$-dimensional Hilbert space $H$. Can an experiment distinguish ...
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599 views

Tensor product decomposition of SU(2)

I have a rather trivial question. I am looking for the decomposition of $1/2\otimes 1/2\otimes 1/2$. It should give, $0,1/2$ and $3/2$. I thought one must get as the overall dimension of this space 8, ...
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161 views

Spin polarization of decay products

A relativistic moving particle, e.g. muon $\mu^+$, described by its four-momentum vector $p_\mu$, charge $e$ and with a given spin polarization, ${\bf S}=(S_x,S_y,S_z)$, decays into three particles, ...
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224 views

In solving the hydrogen atom, how to see intuitively in advance that the spin effects to the energy spectrum can be ignored?

When the hydrogen atom is solved in QM books spin is usually ignored because its effect is to add tiny piece to the energy. My question is, is there a way to see this in advance, to see that if we ...
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199 views

Parity and Helicity of the Higgs Boson

I have been studying how the spin and parity of the new boson discovered at the LHC will be studied and have run into some confusion. The Standard Model Higgs is expected to be a scalar (i.e. have ...
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1answer
127 views

Determining the spin of wavefunction

We all know that by uncertainty principle, location of a wave-particle is perfectly determined when uncertainty of momentum becomes infinite. (I also heard that in reality, it is almost impossible to ...
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565 views

The Stern Gerlach Experiment Revisited

Is it possible to provide an explanation to the observations of the Stern Gerlach Experiment using the classical theories? Some Considerations: We consider the standard set-up for the ...
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4answers
717 views

Can the Klein-Gordon Equation represent Particles with non-zero spin?

Every Solution of the Dirac Equation is also a solution of the Klein-Gordon equation. So the K-G equation does not necessarily represent particles with non-zero spin. Would it be incorrect to ...
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402 views

Why and how is nondegenerate perturbation theory used for time evolution under $\vec{L}.\vec{S}$ coupling?

Let us say that we start with an electron which is in a spin up state and has a spatial wave-function of the form $xf(r)$. Then one turns on a perturbation of the form ...
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267 views

Very basic question on spin

Can anyone give a simple explanation for what the fractions and integers mean in particle physics when describing spin? I've seen on another forum (the naked scientist) that it should not be thought ...
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1answer
241 views

Does the expression of the orbital magnetic dipole moment have $c$?

The orbital magnetic dipole moment of a particle with mass $m$ and charge $q$ can be shown to be related to the orbital angular momentum through the equation $$\displaystyle ...
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1answer
208 views

Charge-less, Mass-less, Spin Fields

after looking through a couple QFT texts it seems that all the spin-1/2 fields come associated with a charge of some sort. I was wondering if it's possible to write down a classical lagrangian (with ...
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Why Silver atoms were used in Stern-Gerlach experiment?

For the Stern-Gerlach experiment done in 1922: Why were silver atoms used? Silver atoms contain many electrons in different shells (with different angular momemtum quantum numbers. Why are those not ...
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2answers
880 views

How is angular momentum measured in experiments/in practice? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How does one experimentally determine chirality, helicity and spin? How do you find spin of a particle from experimental data? We read about and study angular momentum ...
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1answer
47 views

Will an entangled idler electron induce a current in a conductor if the signal elctron's spin is measured?

I'm assuming a hypothetical setup as follows: Two labs (Alice and Bob) exist. Each has one electron of an entangled pair. At Alice, the electron travels through free space towards a magnetic field of ...
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488 views

How can a particle with no size have angular momentum?

I was recently reading about Higgs boson and particle spin and I stumbled upon a question that explains what is spin. It explains that electrons have no size yet they have angular momentum. I don't ...
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What does it really mean that particle has a spin of up/down? And how is spin actually meassured?

I been reading some physics articles (related to the recent discovery of the particle that could be a Higgs boson) posted online and it was talking about electron spin and how it can only have values ...
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How do you find spin of a particle from experimental data?

So I was wondering, with all this Higgs talk going on, they just detected a particle with a mass of 125 GeV (CMS) or 126.5 GeV (ATLAS). But they still don't know what it is, since there is tons of ...
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1answer
319 views

Twistor notation in space-time (Part 1)

This is sort of a continuation of this and this previous discussions. In the first of my links one sees the surjective isometry between real or complex $(1,3)$ signature Minkowski space and the real ...
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What does spin 0 mean exactly?

I heard two definitions: (1) Spin 0 means that the particle has spherical symmetry, without any preferred axis. (2) The spin value tells after which angle of rotation the wave function returns to ...
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1answer
460 views

Magnetic moment derivation from Dirac equation

I am reading a text book where they show the electron has spin 1/2 using Dirac's equation. At one point in the derivation they define $\pi=P-qA/c$ where $P$ is the momentum operator and A is the ...
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377 views

Do other particles besides scalars admit tachyonic solutions?

Do other particles besides scalars admit tachyonic solutions? For example fermions or gauge-boson tachyons? The picture in my head is that a tachyonic scalar simply rolls off some unstable potential ...
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Why does photon have only two possible eigenvalues of helicity?

Photon is a spin-1 particle. Were it massive, its spin projected along some direction would be either 1, -1, or 0. But photons can only be in an eigenstate of $S_z$ with eigenvalue $\pm 1$ (z as the ...
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647 views

Why does spin have a discrete spectrum?

Why is it that unlike other quantum properties such as momentum and velocity, which usually are given through (probabilistic) continuous values, spin has a (probabilistic) discrete spectrum?
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Adding 3 electron spins

I've learned how to add two 1/2-spins, which you can do with C-G-coefficients. There are 4 states (one singlet, three triplet states). States are symmetric or antisymmetric and the quantum numbers ...
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213 views

Lorentz spinors of $SO(n,1)$ and conformal spinors of $SO(n,2)$

It would be great if someone can give me a reference (short enough!) which explains the (spinor) representation theory of the groups $SO(n,1)$ and $SO(n,2)$. I have searched through a few standard ...
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1answer
272 views

Quantum Entanglement - Measuring Twice

In the answer here and on the wiki article and many other articles it is mentioned that if one of 2 entangled particles is measured their state collapses according to the Copenhagen interpretation. ...
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955 views

Can the spin of a photon change during its “life”?

Or is the spin set in one of two possible states at its moment of creation and does not change for the rest of the duration of its "life"?
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1answer
242 views

How could $\textbf{S}^2$ not be a multiple of the identity?

I'm self-studying quantum mechanics with Sakurai's book (Modern Quantum Mechanics, 2nd edition) and came across the following in reference to the operator $\textbf{S}^2$: As will be shown in ...
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826 views

Probability of getting a particular spin

I'm a beginner in quantum mechanics, and I'm a bit confused about states and the probability to measure certain values. I would like to understand at least the following simplified situation: ...
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33 views

How can we know about particle spin? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How does one experimentally determine chirality, helicity and spin? This is a rough quite from Hawking: "An elementary particle with 0 spin looks the same no matter ...
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2answers
661 views

How to find that a molecule has zero spin?

I read that Ne has $S=0$. How can this be found, knowing the electron configuration? Electrons, protons and neutrons all have 1/2 spin. The Pauli exclusion principle implies that the even number of ...
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1answer
303 views

Irreducible tensor representations with “covariant” indices

As a follow-up of my question on the "most general" $\mathrm{SU}(2)$-symmetric interaction of two spin 1/2 particles, I ponder the following question: Consider an operator acting just on one particle ...
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353 views

Constructing the “most general” two-particle spin interaction with $SU(2)$ symmetry

Suppose I want to write down an interaction term for an action for spin 1/2 fermions that is $SU(2)$-symmetric. I start from the most naive general form of such an action: $$S_{int} ~=~ \int_{4321} ...
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135 views

Does spin alone have any effect on the physical interactions of particles?

In Hartree-Fock theory the time-independent electronic energy of a single (restricted) determinant electronic wavefunction consists of one electron terms, $h_{ii}$, Coulomb interaction energies, ...
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908 views

What is a general definition of the spin of a particle?

In quantum field theory, one defines a particle as a unitary irreducible representations of the Poincaré group. The study of these representations allows to define the mass and the spin of the ...
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912 views

Relationship between nuclear spin and nuclear magnetic moment?

We know that nuclear magnetic moment can be expressed in terms of the expected value for nuclear spin as: $$\langle\mu\rangle =[g_lj+(g_s-g_l)\langle s_z\rangle]\frac{\mu_N}{\hbar}$$ (Cf. Krane), ...
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151 views

Quantum entanglement of spin along multiple orthogonal axes

Picture an entangled pair of spin 1/2-spin particles with total spin 0. In the diagram, particle 1 of the pair is moving to the left (-y), and particle 2 to the right (+y). If a z-oriented SG$^*$ is ...
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236 views

What are the specific electronic properties that make an atom ferromagnetic versus simply paramagnetic?

As I understand it, paramagnetism is similar in its short-term effect to ferromagnetism (spins of the electrons line up with the magnetic field, etc.), though apparently the effect is weaker. What is ...
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227 views

Thought experiment with entangled electrons

Suppose we start out by having two entangled electrons. We separate them by some distance and we put one electron inside a thin loop of wire connected to an extremely sensitive voltage measuring ...
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503 views

The Asymmetry between Real and Imaginary in the three Pauli Spin Matrices

The Pauli spin matrices $$ \sigma_1 ~=~ (\begin{smallmatrix} 0 & 1 \\ 1 & 0 \end{smallmatrix}), \qquad\qquad \sigma_2 ~=~ (\begin{smallmatrix} 0 & -i \\ i & 0 ...
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1answer
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Why is oxygen in a triplet state and what are the consequences?

From Wikipedia here and here: ''Almost all molecules encountered in daily life exist in a singlet state, but molecular oxygen is an exception.'' ''The unusual electron configuration prevents ...
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484 views

Do particles have different spins in different frames of reference?

Let's say we have two photons, whose momentum vectors point to opposite directions. Also spin angular momentum vectors of the photons point to opposite directions. (Sum of spins is zero) Now we ...
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1answer
272 views

Scaling with the Ising Model

I am stuck with one formula in the CFT book by Di Francesco and al. Chapter 3. Equation 3.46 third step, for those who don't have the book, he integrates out degrees of freedom from the Ising Model by ...
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540 views

Why is the value of spin +/- 1/2?

I understand how spin is defined in analogy with orbital angular momentum. But why must electron spin have magnetic quantum numbers $m_s=\pm \frac{1}{2}$ ? Sure, it has to have two values in ...
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Why do we need 12 atoms to store 1 bit of data?

Recent research at IBM has found a way to store 1 bit of data in 12 atoms. While that is a big accomplishment compared to what we have today, it does seem like a waste to a non-physics eye like me. ...
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Calculating lagrangian density from first principle

In most of the field theory text they will start with lagrangian density for spin 1 and spin 1/2 particles. But i could find any text where this lagrangian density is derived from first principle.
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How are the Pauli matrices for the electron spin derived?

Could you explain how to derive the Pauli matrices? $$\sigma_1 = \sigma_x = \begin{pmatrix} 0&1 \\ 1&0 \end{pmatrix}\,, \qquad \sigma_2 = \sigma_y = \begin{pmatrix} 0&-i\\ ...