Fundamental characteristic property of particles which together with orbital angular momentum acts as the generator of rotations and which doesn't have a classical equivalent but is sometimes compared to and contrasted with classical intrinsic angular momentum.

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297 views

Can 3 photons be combined to give a spin-0 projection?

Motivation: The neutral pion decays to 2 photons ($\pi^0\to\gamma\gamma$) most of the time. For the decay of the neutral to 3 photons ($\pi^0\to 3\gamma$) we have an upper limit on the branching ...
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225 views

For mesons, or baryons, do sea quarks contribute to the angular momentum of the bound state?

The total angular momentum of a bound state of quarks, such as a meson say, can be done by studying the spin and orbital angular momentum of the 2 valence quarks. What about the sea quarks why they ...
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252 views

Doubts concerning Wigner's classification

Wigner classified particles in function of the eigenvalues of $P_\mu P^\mu$ and $W_\mu W^\mu$. Then, it can be proved that for massless particles spin values can be only $\pm s_{max}$. But for a ...
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196 views

Possible states for two electrons in the helium atom

Consider the helium atom with two electrons, but ignore coupling of angular momenta, relativistic effects, etc. The spin state of the system is a combination of the triplet states and the singlet ...
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236 views

Is conservation of statistics logically independent of spin?

If the number of fermions is $n$, we expect the quantity $(-1)^n$ to be conserved, i.e., $n$ never changes between even and odd. This is known as conservation of statistics. In the normal context of ...
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360 views

Baryon wave function symmetry

If a baryon wavefunction is $\Psi = \psi_{spatial} \psi_{colour} \psi_{flavour} \psi_{spin}$, and we consider the ground state (L=0) only. We know that the whole thing has to be antisymmetric under ...
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431 views

In quantum mechanics(QM), can we define a high-dimensional “spin” angular momentum other than the ordinary 3D one?

Inspired by my previous question Questions about angular momentum and 3-dimensional(3D) space? and another relevant question How to define angular momentum in other than three dimensions? , now I get ...
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457 views

Hamiltonian of Harmonic Oscillator with Spin Term

We have the usual Hamiltonian for the 1D Harmonic Oscillator: $\hat{H_{0}}=\frac{\hat{P^2}}{2m} + \frac{1}{2}m \omega \hat{X^2}$ Now a new term has been added to the Hamiltonian, $\hat{H} = ...
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1answer
184 views

Spin(n) group SO(n) relation

Is it correct to state that the elements of Spin(n) fulfill a Clifford algebra and that the Lie group generators of Spin(n) is given by the commutator of the elements? If not, then what is the ...
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110 views

Is it only the spin of a particle that can be entangled with another particles spin?

Is it only the spin of a particle that can be entangled with another particles spin? Also is there any good physical interpretation of the spin of a particle? because the rotational invariance of ...
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211 views

Helicity operator in Non relativistic limit

Helicity operator in Dirac equation is given by $$H=\frac{\vec{S}\times \vec{P}}{P^{2}}$$ This operator commutes with dirac hamiltonian.We can also define a helicity(with same form) operator in case ...
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374 views

Does a quadrupole transition mean emission of one photon with spin 2?

If it's true and spin-2 photons do exist, could you please point to some literature that discusses spin-2 photons? If not, then how exactly does a selection rule for quadrupole transition make sense ...
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How to tackle 'dot' product for spin matrices

I read a textbook today on quantum mechanics regarding the Pauli spin matrices for two particles, it gives the Hamiltonian as $$ H = \alpha[\sigma_z^1 + \sigma_z^2] + ...
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99 views

Electron Spin Resonance and Free electrons

When performing an experiment to observe electron spin resonance, we use DPPH molecules as they contain an unpaired electron on one of the N atoms. My question is, why cant free electrons be used in ...
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518 views

What is the difference between the properties of Electron spin and Photon polarization/helicity?

What is the difference between a photon's polarization/helicity and an electrons spin half? I know that the photon is spin 1 but isn't its polarization analogous to spin half? This question stems ...
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4answers
693 views

Huge confusion with Fermions and Bosons and how they relate to total spin of atom

I am supremely confused when something has spin or when it does not. For example, atomic Hydrogen has 4 fermions, three quarks to make a proton, and 1 electron. There is an even number of fermions, ...
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471 views

Meaning of spin

I'm pretty astounded that I did not hear about this sooner, but in my course on QFT our professor told us that the concept of spin can be used to mean three things: Mechanical spin (apparently a ...
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117 views

In what direction does a frustrated magnetic moment get aligned?

Consider 3 layers of Ferromagnetic materials stacked on top of each other with appropriate spacer layers in between. Let the top and bottom layers be pinned to layers of Anti Ferromagnets adjacent to ...
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348 views

Do EM waves transmit spin polarization?

Suppose you have a normal dipole antennae (transmitter and receiver) . Spin polarized current (as opposed to normal current) is sent into the transmitter, it emits an EM wave and the Receiver receives ...
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276 views

Does String Theory explain spin?

The state of a particle will generally change if you rotate it. The details of how the state changes under an infinitesimal rotation are contained in the angular momentum operator J. This operator can ...
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172 views

Calculating the path of a ball with spin moving across a table

A ping pong ball is rolling over a smooth (but not frictionless) table. During its travel, a clockwise spin is placed on the ball. The ball's path is changed to move to the right (in perspective from ...
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1answer
92 views

Spin Liquid in a band insulator?

In the literature, spin liquids are only possible in Mott insulators, however, I'm not entirely sure why the nuclear spin can't create a spin liquid in a band insulator. Is this possible? If so, is ...
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357 views

Did the Feynman heuristic of “simple effects have simple causes” fail for spin statistics?

Someone here recently noted that "The spin-statistics thing isn't a problem, it is a theorem (a demonstrably valid proposition), and it shouldn't be addressed, it should be understood and celebrated." ...
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757 views

How is parity relevant to determining angular momentum?

Question: Particle A, whose spin $\mathbf{J}$ is less than 2, decays into two identical spin-1/2 particles of type B. What are the allowed values of the orbital angular momentum $\mathbf{L}$, ...
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184 views

Ground and first excited state of non interacting spin system Hamiltonian

For a non interacting spin system containing two $\frac{1}{2}$ spin particles I am trying to determine its Hamiltonian. If the energy of a up spin is $+\mu {\bf B}$ and a down spin is $-\mu {\bf B}$, ...
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268 views

Ground states of the Hamiltonian of a two spin system

For the spin system shown in this graph (http://i.stack.imgur.com/3lg1R.png), the Hamiltonian is $$S^{(1)}_z\cdot S^{(1)}_z=\frac{1}{4}\begin{pmatrix} 1 & 0 &0 &0 \\ 0&-1 &0 ...
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243 views

What Pauli matrices should I use for this two spin system?

Consider the Hamiltonian $H = -J_\text{F}S^{(1)}_zS^{(2)}_z + J_{AF}S^{(1)}_zS^{(2)}_z$, describing the graph Here, F means ferromagnetic and AF means antiferromagnetic interactions. I am having ...
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285 views

Why does scattering depend on spin?

I'm reading about giant magnetoresistance (GMR), and the most important feature of this phenomenon is the spin dependance of the electron scattering inside a magnetised lattice. However, I don't quite ...
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1answer
501 views

Do all black holes spin in the same direction?

My question is as stated above, do all black holes spin the same direction? To my knowledge, the spin in the direction of the spin of the matter that created them. Another similar question was asked ...
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289 views

Spin of a particle and spin quantum number [duplicate]

what actually does the spin quantum number of a particle describe about? What it means when we say photon has spin 1, Higgs boson has spin 0, etc..?? What actually does that numerical value explain? I ...
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145 views

Reaction force in electron spin measurements

Consider the following (thought) experiment, where an electron is emitted, then deflected by a magnetic field, and then detected: Because the momentum of the electron changes when it gets ...
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369 views

Spin about an arbitrary axis

This is based off question 4.30 from Griffith's Introduction to Quanum Mechanics. It asks for the matrix $\textbf{S}_r$ representing the component of spin angular momentum about an axis defined by: ...
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107 views

What are some ways of inducing spin polarization?

I saw a talk today and they mentioned how nitrogen-vacancy diamond centers can be used to optically induce spin polarization and now I wonder what other ways there are to induce a spin polarization. ...
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142 views

Trilinear gauge couplings: Spin

In non-abelian gauge theories self interaction of gauge fields is permitted, allowing coupling such as $WWZ$ (i.e. $Z$-boson decaying to $W^+W^-$) or ggg (i.e. gluon splitting into two new gluons). ...
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Pauli matrix rotations

When doing physics with two-level systems and introducing rotations, a term that appears quite often is the rotation of a pauli matrix by another one: $e^{- i \sigma_i \theta/2} \sigma_k e^{i ...
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170 views

Quantum entanglement, quantum measurement, spin and position

By uncertainty principle, we know that determining particle's position at some location is limited. So we cannot determine the position of a particle at some exact point location as this would make ...
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How is multiplicity given by 2S+1?

Suppose there are two electrons in an atom with $s_1 = \frac{1}{2}$, $l_1 = 1$ and $s_2 = \frac{1}{2}$, $l_2 = 1$. Hence the total $S$ (of the atom) may be +1 or 0. And total $L$ is either $+2$, $+1$ ...
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How do you fit a dipole in an electron?

Experiments used to observe particle spin properties (such as Stern-Gerlach) rely on a varied magnetic field and a dipole-like reaction in the particle, deflecting it in one direction or another. In ...
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59 views

What exactly is the spin of a particle? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is spin as it relates to subatomic particles? I'm having a hard time grasping the concept of spin, my textbook describes it very vaguely: Stable matter contains ...
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268 views

Does the electromagnetic field “spin”?

Due to electron "spin", a small magnetic field is produced. Maxwell's equations imply that magnetic fields are due to changes in electric fields. Is the magnetic field produced then because the ...
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0answers
157 views

Does the electron have spin in it's own reference frame?

In our atomic physics class, we saw that the spin-orbit coupling term arises from the scalar product of the magnetic moment of the electron (proportional to its spin), and the magnetic field created ...
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4answers
788 views

Could one argue that h (Planck constant) and $\hbar$/2 (Dirac constant) are in fact independant constants?

My question is very naive and could sound strange but it seems to me natural in so far as the Planck constant is related to the first quantization (of newtonian particle mechanics/galilean relativity) ...
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3answers
371 views

Quantum mechanical angular momentum and spin formalism/notation

I am currently stuck on the following notation: $\frac{1}{2}\otimes\frac{1}{2} = 0 \text{ (antisym) } \oplus 1 \text{ (sym) }$ No matter what I tried, I couldn't derive the identity. I am sure that ...
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1answer
109 views

Is the spin state of an atom related to the polarization of the photon it spontaneously emits?

From literature I've been reading, I find that scientists are able to "map" atomic states onto photon states. Are they talking about spin states and corresponding photon polarization states? Can ...
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2answers
719 views

Why do many people say vector fields describe spin-1 particle but omit the spin-0 part?

We know a vector field is a $(\frac{1}{2},\frac{1}{2})$ representation of Lorentz group, which should describe both spin-1 and spin-0 particles. However many of the articles(mostly lecture notes) I've ...
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When you apply the spin operator, what exactly is does it tell you?

The example I'm trying to understand is: $ \hat{S}_{x} \begin{pmatrix} \frac{1}{\sqrt{2}}\\ \frac{1}{\sqrt{2}} \end{pmatrix} = 1/2 \begin{pmatrix} \frac{1}{\sqrt{2}}\\ \frac{1}{\sqrt{2}} ...
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Representations of Lorentz Group

I'd be grateful if someone could check that my exposition here is correct, and then venture an answer to the question at the end! $SO(3)$ has a fundamental representation (spin-1), and tensor product ...
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Number of Components of a Spinor

I'm trying to develop my understanding of spinors. In quantum field theory I've learned that a spinor is a 4 component complex vector field on Minkowski space which transforms under the chiral ...
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2answers
460 views

Why for a spin half particle, possible outcomes of measuring spin projection along any direction are the same?

If one measures the projection of spin of a spin half particle along the x axis one will always get plus or minus half $\hbar$ Measuring it along the y axis one will always get plus or minus half ...
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Classical vs. Quantum use of the spin 4-vector

I have a few basic questions about the Pauli-Lubanski spin 4-vector S. I've used it in quantum mechanical calculations as an operator, that is to say each of the components of S is a matrix operator ...