Fundamental characteristic property of particles which together with orbital angular momentum acts as the generator of rotations and which doesn't have a classical equivalent but is sometimes compared to and contrasted with classical intrinsic angular momentum.

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Russell-Saunders Term

The Russell-Saunders term states that: $$^{2S+1}L_{J}$$ Now, if I'm not mistaken, $L$ is the total orbital angular momentum, $J = L + S$, but what is $S$ exactly? I know it's the total spin angular ...
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104 views

Spin tensor and Lorentz group operator in bispinor case

For infinisesimal bispinor transformations we have $$ \delta \Psi = \frac{1}{2}\omega^{\mu \nu}\eta_{\mu \nu}\Psi , \quad \delta \bar {\Psi} = -\frac{1}{2}\omega^{\mu \nu}\bar {\Psi}\eta_{\mu \nu}, ...
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183 views

Wave functions for 2D potential with spin interactions

So consider a 2D system with a circular potential and a spin-orbit interaction: $V(r) = V_0 \theta(r_0 - r) + c r_0 V_0 L_z S_z \delta(r-r_0)$ where $\theta$ is step function. So the operators ...
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1answer
158 views

Maxwell's equations as the particular case of massive vector field equation

There was a discussion (please look to the comments on my answer) about getting Maxwell's equations for free spin-1 field by using massive spin-1 representation's equations. I'll start from the ...
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61 views

Spin of a decay product

A particle A decays into particles B, C and D. The spin of A, B and C particles is 1/2 each. What are the possible spins of particle D? My attempt is the following: Since B and C have spin 1/2 ...
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448 views

Why magnetic field lines and force are not orthogonal with magnets?

The below explanation why magnetism exists is superb in this video. The explanation about magnets is also great in this video. A magnet has atoms with unpaired electrons forming mini magnets. The ...
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1k views

Simularity transformation of Heisenberg XXZ Hamiltonian

I am considering the Heisenberg XXZ Hamiltonian: $$ H(\Delta, J) = J\sum_{i=1}^L\left(\sigma^x_i\sigma^x_{i+1} + \sigma^y_i\sigma^y_{i+1} + \Delta \sigma^z_i\sigma^z_{i+1} \right) $$ Apparently, one ...
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119 views

Stern-Gerlach and Hund's second rule

According to Hund's second rule, the spin tends to be maximal. That would, in my understanding, imply that, regarding the Stern-Gerlach experiment, the important electron in a silver atom has spin ...
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3answers
351 views

Why gravity is an attractive force? [duplicate]

Why gravity is an attractive force? One may say that it is because of space time curvature but General Relativity is built on this law: $\displaystyle G \frac{m_1 \times m_2}{r^2}$ (To be more ...
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51 views

Measuring the spin of a particle from a singlet state

Imagine that I have a singlet state: $|s\rangle = {1 \over \sqrt2}(| \uparrow_1\downarrow_2 \rangle - |\downarrow_1\uparrow_2\rangle)$ I want to measure the spin along the z axis of the first ...
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72 views

How do we determine the statistics and spin of quasi-particles?

I am considering the Heisenberg XXZ model at the moment. In the literature it says that (in the $J\Delta\rightarrow\infty$ limit, i.e. the ferromagnetic Ising regime) one can either view low-energy ...
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726 views

Some limiting cases of the Heisenberg XXZ model (2/2)

NOTE: Because this was a long question I have split it up in two different questions! For a course on quantum integrability I am reading these notes. (Franchini: Notes on Bethe Ansatz Techniques. ...
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247 views

Do spin-spin interactions break time reversal symmetry?

I'm sure the answer is yes, but how is this shown? Normally for a single spin-1/2 you have a time reversal operator: $-i \sigma_y \hat{K}$ where $\sigma_y$ is the second Pauli matrix and $\hat{K}$ is ...
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What the quantum spin refers to? How we calculate the angular momentum $\omega$ from the spin quantum number?

How we calculate the angular momentum $\omega$ from the spin quantum number, to know how fast a particle rotating on its own axis?
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98 views

Is spin just due to uncertainty in angular momentum?

I can't seem to think of any way to envision electron spin. Can it be thought of as the uncertainty in angular momentum?
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65 views

Will macroscopic object change its angular velocity after absorbing electron?

Consider macroscopic object (a ball for instance) which has angular momentum equals 0. Now single electron hits the ball and is absorbed by it. Let's assume it hits in direction perpendicular to ...
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332 views

Why can't I just think the spin as rotating?

I'm going mad about the problem. I really don't understand why do electron have 1/2 spin number, why they are not actually spinning. I can accept that the electrons have their own magnetic field, ...
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126 views

Which way do black hole jets spin?

The centers of black holes and quasars often have jets coming out the two poles of an accretion disk, say north and south. Is it known if the two jets spin in the same direction or opposite ...
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133 views

Term symbol - how do we know the number of electrons $e^-$?

Lets say I have a term symbol $^4D_{5/2}$. From this I can simply read the total quantum numbers numbers $L=2$ and $J=5/2$. Now the superscripted number $4$ is called multiplicity if I am not ...
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131 views

Relation between the spin of a particle and the polarization of it's wave

Is there any intrinsic relation between the spin of a particle, and the degree of freedom of it's polarization? does it holds for any particle-wave couple? like EM-photon, ...
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1answer
257 views

How do you determine the elementary particle's spin number?

I know that electrons and protons have a spin of 1/2, whereas photons have a spin of 1,. However, I do not know how this is determined? How is it determined?
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162 views

What is the interpretation of the Chern-Simons electromagnetic spin density?

Hans de Vries (who happens to be a no-longer-active physics.SE user) has an online book (referenced below) in which ch. 6 is a presentation of an object he calls the Chern-Simons current, ...
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193 views

link between real particles, representation of algebra and Young tableau

I know that different representations of this algebra correspond to different spin. One can sort the representation according to the casimir. For any simple Lie algebra, the operator ...
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141 views

How to theoretically determine the angular momentum of an atom?

To determine if an atom is a boson or a fermion I have to count the fermions that constitute the atom (protons, neutrons and electrons). My question is: How to theoretically (as opposed to ...
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115 views

Why does earth spins? [duplicate]

I understand the governing force causing the earth's cycle around the sun is gravity. It can be described by Keplar's law. But what causes the earth's spin? what is its governing law?
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180 views

Symmetric transverse traceless tensors of rank $s$ and $(s,0,0,..,0)$ representations of $SO(n)$

Can someone help see this connection as to why a spin $s$ (an Integer) particle is to be thought of as a symmetric transverse traceless tensor of rank $s$ and that they lie in the $(s,0,0,..,0)$ ...
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190 views

Can one prove the full spin-statistics theorem from the spin 0, 1/2 and 1 cases?

Using second quantization for scalar field, spinor field and vector fields, we can get commutation and anticommutation relations for the birth and destruction operators of the fields, which leads us ...
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217 views

Magnetic moment of electron

Since magnetic moment come from the circulation of charge, what is the origination of the electron's magnetic moment? Because spin of electron is not the classical spin of particle. Can we say that ...
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149 views

Chirality and helicity operators for the massless bispinor rep and their generalisation on arbitrary (tensor, 4-vector etc) cases

Let's have chirality projection operator $$ \hat {C}_{\pm} = \frac{1 \pm \gamma^{5}}{2}. $$ We introduce it and called it chirality, because $$ \hat {C}_{+}\psi = \begin{pmatrix} \psi_{\alpha} \\ 0 ...
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142 views

Chirality, helicity and their relationship for the massless case

Chirality can be interpreted as a property of Lorentz group - Lorentz transformation of field through representation $(s, 0)$ or representation $(0, s)$. For the massless particles one says, that ...
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111 views

Quantization of Electron Spin

Why is electron spin quantized? I've seen the derivation for the Hydrogen atom's energy levels, but my professor jumped to electrons having spin 1/2 or -1/2 as experimental. Why do electrons obey the ...
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How do we know photons have spin 1?

Electrons have spin 1/2, and as they are charged, they also have an associated magnetic moment, which can be measured by an electron beam splitting up in an inhomogeneous magnetic field or through the ...
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219 views

Eigenvalues of the square of Pauli-Lubanski operator

Let's have Pauli-Lunanski 4-operator: $$ \hat {W}^{\nu} = \frac{1}{2}\varepsilon^{\nu \alpha \beta \gamma}\hat {J}_{\alpha \beta}\hat {P}_{\gamma}, $$ which easy transforms to $$ \hat {W}^{\nu} = ...
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79 views

The square of Pauli-Lubanski operator

Let's have Pauli-Lubanski operator: $$ \hat {W}^{\alpha} = \frac{1}{2}\varepsilon^{\alpha \beta \gamma \delta}\hat {J}_{\beta \gamma}\hat {P}_{\delta} = \frac{1}{2}\varepsilon^{\alpha \beta \gamma ...
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163 views

Fractionalization and the structure of spin rotation group?

As we know, the phenomena of fractionalizations in condensed matter physics is fantastic, like fractional spin, fractional charge , fractional statistics, .... And one key point is that the ...
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245 views

Pauli matrices as measurement operators

I am trying to understand a paper on the Bell test experiments. I understand that if we wanted to measure the spin of a spin-1/2 particle in state $\psi$ along the z-axis we would apply the operator ...
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2answers
121 views

Lorentz homogeneous group and observables

For generators of the Lorentz group we have the following algebra: $$ [\hat {R}_{i}, \hat {R}_{j} ] = -\varepsilon_{ijk}\hat {R}_{k}, \quad [\hat {R}_{i}, \hat {L}_{j} ] = -\varepsilon_{ijk}\hat ...
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154 views

Can atoms have nonzero dipole moments?

Let's make the question easier by considering two-level atoms(with spin states, i.e. spin up $|\uparrow\rangle$ and spin down $|\downarrow\rangle$). An article I recently read claims that atoms do not ...
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204 views

How does spin appear in QFT?

In QFT, as I read, it appears naturally. It is connected with Poincare algebra, doesn't it? __ As explanation of the main part of the question. Operator of relativistic orbital angular momentum ...
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439 views

How does one show using QED that same/opposite electric charges repel/attract each other, respectively?

Why do same charges repel each other and opposite charges attract each other (please explain the phenomenon using real laws of nature (QED) not with the approximation model)?
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159 views

Operator of full angular momentum and spin operator

In relativistic mechanics classical angular momentum of one particle with center of energy vector creates angular momentum tensor. It's algebra is the same as Poincare group algebra. So in operator's ...
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43 views

What physical value is described by following operator?

Let's have the system of point-like non-interacting particles and it's own angular momentum $$ \mathbf L_{1} = \mathbf L - [\mathbf R_{E} \times \mathbf P], $$ where $\mathbf R_{E}$ - center of energy ...
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The connection between classical and quantum spins

I have two questions, which are connected with each other. The first question. In a classical relativistic (SRT) case for one particle can be defined (in a reason of "antisymmetric" nature of ...
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199 views

What is the meaning of spin two?

As the title suggests, what is the meaning of spin two? I kind of understand spin half for electrons. I can kind of understand spin one for other particles. However I'm not sure how something could ...
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1answer
168 views

Does the spin precession change sign when the angular momentum does?

Say you have a charged particle moving circularly in an electromagnetic field. Basic quantum mechanics tell us that its spin will precess with a certain frequency. If the same particle were traveling ...
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153 views

Charged pion decay and spin conservation

Charged pions $\pi^\pm$ decay via an intermediate $W$ to (e.g.) a lepton-neutrino pair. The pions being scalar (spin-0) particles and the intermediate $W$ having spin 1, how is spin conserved in ...
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72 views

Why do cosmic bodies revolve? [duplicate]

Why do cosmic bodies such as planets, stars, satellites revolve? What made them to revolve after the formation of universe?
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163 views

Anyons without fractional spin?

Is it possible to have particles obeying anyonic statistics but not having fractional spin? I am wondering, because while spin in quantum physics arises from the geometry/topology of spacetime, ...
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Writing wave functions with spin of a system of particles

Suppose I have 2 fermions in a potential $V(x)$. Both particles are moving in one dimension: the $x$ axis. Then, neglecting the interaction between the particles, the spatial wave function of the ...
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antiferromagnetic spin wave

I have a hamiltonian that is derived from a spin wave energy dispersion calculation for a nearest neighbor interacting cubic antiferromagnet. After a Holstein-Primakoff transformation and making a ...