7
votes
1answer
67 views

What causes Paulis Exclusion Principle?

Currently I'm taking an astrophysics class and has now come across electron degeneracy. As far as I understand, the reason why white dwarfs and such, does not collapse, is due to this, meaning that ...
1
vote
1answer
30 views

anti-symmetric spin wave function of $|^3\text{He}\rangle$

Consider $|^3\text{He}\rangle$ in the ground state (2 protons and 1 neutron). Assume the spatial part of the wave function is symmetric. I have to construct the spin part of the wave function. This is ...
2
votes
1answer
68 views

Angular momentum of anyons

Why is it true that anyons can have angular momentum taking any real value? Why aren't they restricted to the $j(j+1)$ integer values most are familar with?
7
votes
1answer
263 views

Double connectivity of $SO(3)$ group manifold

Is there any physical significance of the fact that the group manifold (parameter space) of $SO(3)$ is doubly connected? EDIT 1: Let me clarify my question. It was too vague. There exists two ...
2
votes
1answer
171 views

Why do electrons couple in atoms?

In describing electron states in hydrogen, we have a very "simple" picture, at least in intro-quantum. But this only has one electron! As we permit more electrons, we also have things like the ...
1
vote
2answers
427 views

What is the significance of electron spin quantum number?

Somewhere I read that spin quantum number is a particularly interesting theory of quantum mechanics as what it really implies is that particles like electrons do not come back to the initial state of ...
6
votes
3answers
369 views

Is the symmetrisation postulate unnecessary according to Landau Lifshitz?

The symmetrisation postulate is known for stating that, in nature, particles have either completely symmetric or completely antisymmetric wave functions. According to these postulate, these states are ...
2
votes
2answers
274 views

Why Pauli exclusion instead of electrons canceling out?

To quote Wikipedia, The Pauli exclusion principle is the quantum mechanical principle that no two identical fermions (particles with half-integer spin) may occupy the same quantum state ...
3
votes
2answers
383 views

Example of a wavefunction that cannot be represented by a single Slater determinant

I know that in general, interacting fermions cannot necessarily be described by a single Slater determinant. Can anyone provide a simple example of a state that has no such representation?
7
votes
2answers
1k views

What causes the Pauli exclusion principle (and why does spin 1/2 = fermion)?

It seems to be related to exchange interaction, but I can't penetrate the Wikipedia article. What has the Pauli exclusion principle to do with indistinguishability?