1
vote
1answer
202 views

Understanding Triplet And Singlet States

We know, $2\otimes 2=3\oplus 1$. Thus we have a spin triplet of states and a spin singlet. Can we regard these states as the spin part of wavefunction for the excited states and the ground state of ...
3
votes
1answer
170 views

Why has a gravitational wave spin 2? (Group theoretically?)

How can I see, using group theoretic arguments, that a the quantum of a gravitational wave has spin 2? How can one show that it is described by a 5 dimensional representation of $SO(3)$? I know the ...
0
votes
1answer
142 views

How to theoretically determine the angular momentum of an atom?

To determine if an atom is a boson or a fermion I have to count the fermions that constitute the atom (protons, neutrons and electrons). My question is: How to theoretically (as opposed to ...
2
votes
1answer
191 views

Can one prove the full spin-statistics theorem from the spin 0, 1/2 and 1 cases?

Using second quantization for scalar field, spinor field and vector fields, we can get commutation and anticommutation relations for the birth and destruction operators of the fields, which leads us ...
0
votes
1answer
114 views

Quantization of Electron Spin

Why is electron spin quantized? I've seen the derivation for the Hydrogen atom's energy levels, but my professor jumped to electrons having spin 1/2 or -1/2 as experimental. Why do electrons obey the ...
5
votes
2answers
157 views

Problem counting spin states

I can't figure out how many different spin states I can create with a four-electron system. I think I can create a spin-zero state, three spin-one states, and five spin-two states. That gives me nine ...
1
vote
2answers
230 views

Doubts concerning Wigner's classification

Wigner classified particles in function of the eigenvalues of $P_\mu P^\mu$ and $W_\mu W^\mu$. Then, it can be proved that for massless particles spin values can be only $\pm s_{max}$. But for a ...
4
votes
2answers
642 views

Why do many people say vector fields describe spin-1 particle but omit the spin-0 part?

We know a vector field is a $(\frac{1}{2},\frac{1}{2})$ representation of Lorentz group, which should describe both spin-1 and spin-0 particles. However many of the articles(mostly lecture notes) I've ...
8
votes
1answer
456 views

Representations of Lorentz Group

I'd be grateful if someone could check that my exposition here is correct, and then venture an answer to the question at the end! $SO(3)$ has a fundamental representation (spin-1), and tensor product ...
8
votes
3answers
523 views

Why does spin have a discrete spectrum?

Why is it that unlike other quantum properties such as momentum and velocity, which usually are given through (probabilistic) continuous values, spin has a (probabilistic) discrete spectrum?