6
votes
3answers
305 views

Why are there no elementary charged, spin-zero particles?

In the spirit of a related inquiry, I would like to know if there's a basis for understanding why there aren't any elementary particles that have non-zero electric charge but zero spin? Can such a ...
2
votes
2answers
117 views

How to explain spin of electron? [duplicate]

How can we explain spin of electron, or the spin of other fundamental particles? If we think the spin of electron is similar to the spin of a ball or planet we make a mistake. We say it is an ...
2
votes
1answer
57 views

Magnetic moment of uncharged particles

As we know that particles, only having charge, can have magnetic moment, then how particle like neutrino (having mass) can have magnetic moment? Don't bother about neutron because it has charge ...
1
vote
0answers
36 views

Is spin an observable quantity for fundamental particles? [duplicate]

How we know that the spin of fundamental particles? For example spin-0, 1/2, 1,2.. What is the experimental facts about spin?
2
votes
0answers
38 views

How do I calculate integer and half integer spin? [closed]

How do I calculate integer and half integer spin, and how do I use the calculations?
4
votes
3answers
185 views

Where does the electron get its high magnetic moment from?

I have always found the concept of spin a little weird. I had read somewhere that for the charge or size of electrons, their magnetic field is very high. In order to produce such fields, they must be ...
5
votes
1answer
86 views

Is there still mystery about spin crisis?

The gluon is a vector boson; like the photon, it has a spin of 1. If this is true and if we know the spin of protons and neutrons then why the news SPIN COMES FROM GLUONS? is telling that, we ...
0
votes
1answer
145 views

Two distinguishable particles in a box

I would like to determine the number of energy states two free, distinguishable particles in a box of length $L$ have. I would then like to determine the number of states two free, indistinguishable ...
3
votes
2answers
117 views

How do you measure proton's spin? [duplicate]

I've probably read it somewhere in Sakurai but I cannot recall it at the moment. So how does one really measure the proton's spin? I mean the proton's spin and not its constituents. Do you measure ...
1
vote
0answers
45 views

What are the ways of finding the spin of a particle [duplicate]

How many ways are there for this mission? Any article about that on the internet. I heard about TODAI made a reprogrammable quantum computer. Any more ideas are welcome
1
vote
2answers
400 views

Angular momentum conservation in pion decay?

I have seen the charged pion decay $$\pi^{-}~\to~ \bar{\nu}_{\ell} +\ell^{-}$$ represented with diagrams containing a $W^-$ in the $s$-channel. The $\pi^-$ and $W^-$ have angular momentum $0$ and $1$ ...
2
votes
0answers
67 views

Spin of a decay product

A particle A decays into particles B, C and D. The spin of A, B and C particles is 1/2 each. What are the possible spins of particle D? My attempt is the following: Since B and C have spin 1/2 ...
3
votes
2answers
492 views

Why can't I just think the spin as rotating?

I'm going mad about the problem. I really don't understand why do electron have 1/2 spin number, why they are not actually spinning. I can accept that the electrons have their own magnetic field, ...
1
vote
1answer
346 views

How do you determine the elementary particle's spin number?

I know that electrons and protons have a spin of 1/2, whereas photons have a spin of 1,. However, I do not know how this is determined? How is it determined?
17
votes
5answers
2k views

How do we know photons have spin 1?

Electrons have spin 1/2, and as they are charged, they also have an associated magnetic moment, which can be measured by an electron beam splitting up in an inhomogeneous magnetic field or through the ...
1
vote
2answers
244 views

What is the meaning of spin two?

As the title suggests, what is the meaning of spin two? I kind of understand spin half for electrons. I can kind of understand spin one for other particles. However I'm not sure how something could ...
2
votes
0answers
203 views

Charged pion decay and spin conservation

Charged pions $\pi^\pm$ decay via an intermediate $W$ to (e.g.) a lepton-neutrino pair. The pions being scalar (spin-0) particles and the intermediate $W$ having spin 1, how is spin conserved in ...
1
vote
1answer
149 views

spin parity $J^P$ notation

In particle physics, when you read $J^P$, does it mean Spin parity or total angular momentum parity? I know that the letter $J$ is used for TOTAL angular momentum but I think I read somewhere that ...
2
votes
1answer
310 views

Can 3 photons be combined to give a spin-0 projection?

Motivation: The neutral pion decays to 2 photons ($\pi^0\to\gamma\gamma$) most of the time. For the decay of the neutral to 3 photons ($\pi^0\to 3\gamma$) we have an upper limit on the branching ...
2
votes
1answer
376 views

Baryon wave function symmetry

If a baryon wavefunction is $\Psi = \psi_{spatial} \psi_{colour} \psi_{flavour} \psi_{spin}$, and we consider the ground state (L=0) only. We know that the whole thing has to be antisymmetric under ...
9
votes
1answer
366 views

Did the Feynman heuristic of “simple effects have simple causes” fail for spin statistics?

Someone here recently noted that "The spin-statistics thing isn't a problem, it is a theorem (a demonstrably valid proposition), and it shouldn't be addressed, it should be understood and celebrated." ...
1
vote
2answers
326 views

Spin of a particle and spin quantum number [duplicate]

what actually does the spin quantum number of a particle describe about? What it means when we say photon has spin 1, Higgs boson has spin 0, etc..?? What actually does that numerical value explain? I ...
3
votes
3answers
152 views

Trilinear gauge couplings: Spin

In non-abelian gauge theories self interaction of gauge fields is permitted, allowing coupling such as $WWZ$ (i.e. $Z$-boson decaying to $W^+W^-$) or ggg (i.e. gluon splitting into two new gluons). ...
0
votes
0answers
61 views

What exactly is the spin of a particle? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is spin as it relates to subatomic particles? I'm having a hard time grasping the concept of spin, my textbook describes it very vaguely: Stable matter contains ...
1
vote
1answer
221 views

Lower bound for the spin in particle decay process

Is my logic right? Suppose there is a particle $p$ that can either decay into $ \{$a spin-1 and a spin-0 particle$\}$ or two spin-0 particles, then the lowest possible spin of $p$ is 2. This is ...
0
votes
1answer
320 views

What process could produce two neutral pions only?

Any examples? $$? \rightarrow \pi^0 \pi^0$$ If such a process exist, could there be nonzero total orbital angular momentum in the final states of the two neutral pions? But then how to understand ...
3
votes
0answers
156 views

Spin polarization of decay products

A relativistic moving particle, e.g. muon $\mu^+$, described by its four-momentum vector $p_\mu$, charge $e$ and with a given spin polarization, ${\bf S}=(S_x,S_y,S_z)$, decays into three particles, ...
5
votes
0answers
193 views

Parity and Helicity of the Higgs Boson

I have been studying how the spin and parity of the new boson discovered at the LHC will be studied and have run into some confusion. The Standard Model Higgs is expected to be a scalar (i.e. have ...
2
votes
4answers
540 views

Can the Klein-Gordon Equation represent Particles with non-zero spin?

Every Solution of the Dirac Equation is also a solution of the Klein-Gordon equation. So the K-G equation does not necessarily represent particles with non-zero spin. Would it be incorrect to ...
8
votes
2answers
575 views

How do you find spin of a particle from experimental data?

So I was wondering, with all this Higgs talk going on, they just detected a particle with a mass of 125 GeV (CMS) or 126.5 GeV (ATLAS). But they still don't know what it is, since there is tons of ...
8
votes
4answers
3k views

What does spin 0 mean exactly?

I heard two definitions: (1) Spin 0 means that the particle has spherical symmetry, without any preferred axis. (2) The spin value tells after which angle of rotation the wave function returns to ...
5
votes
2answers
360 views

Do other particles besides scalars admit tachyonic solutions?

Do other particles besides scalars admit tachyonic solutions? For example fermions or gauge-boson tachyons? The picture in my head is that a tachyonic scalar simply rolls off some unstable potential ...
5
votes
3answers
789 views

Can the spin of a photon change during its “life”?

Or is the spin set in one of two possible states at its moment of creation and does not change for the rest of the duration of its "life"?
0
votes
2answers
471 views

How to find that a molecule has zero spin?

I read that Ne has $S=0$. How can this be found, knowing the electron configuration? Electrons, protons and neutrons all have 1/2 spin. The Pauli exclusion principle implies that the even number of ...
6
votes
1answer
448 views

Fundamental particles with spin > 1

I am in undergraduate quantum mechanics, and the TA made an off-hand comment that currently no one knows how to describe fundamental particles with spin > 1 without supersymmetry. I was curious and ...
14
votes
2answers
1k views

How does one experimentally determine chirality, helicity, spin and angular momentum?

If I've got an instance of a fundamental particle, how can I separate out the measurements of these three concepts? (I think) I understand the theory behind them, and why the particles in the ...
0
votes
2answers
279 views

What happens if up quarks are replaced by down quarks and down quarks are replaced by up quarks?

I believe the quarks would flip the proton's internal charge, reverse the spin of the proton, transform into another flavor, and then become unconfined and free.
0
votes
1answer
207 views

Is the quantum state or information of a particle is all that differentiates it from another particle?

So I have learned in my QM classes that you can't tell one electron from another electron. They are indistinguishable. I also learned that the wavefunction of a particle includes the spacial part and ...
38
votes
3answers
4k views

What is spin as it relates to subatomic particles?

I often hear about subatomic particles having a property called "spin" but also that it doesn't actually relate to spinning about an axis like you would think. Which particles have spin? What does ...