the practice of separating a signal by frequency (or sometimes energy or momentum) and analyzing the resulting spectrum.

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23
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2answers
625 views

Experimental observation of matter/antimatter in the universe

Ordinary matter and antimatter have the same physical properties when it comes to, for example, spectroscopy. Hydrogen and antihydrogen atoms produce the same spectroscopy when excited, and adsorb the ...
6
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4answers
13k views

What is the difference between Raman scattering and fluorescence?

What is the difference between Raman scattering and fluorescence? Both phenomena involve the emission of photons shifted in frequency relative to the incident light, because of some energetic ...
15
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3answers
639 views

What is the probability that a star of a given spectral type will have planets?

There is a lot of new data from the various extrasolar planet projects including NASA's Kepler mission on extra-solar planets. Based on our current data what is the probability that a star of each of ...
2
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2answers
527 views

Do cosmological and Doppler redshift produce different patterns?

For a given black body radiation curve, would the changes to the spectrum resulting from cosmological expansion and those from Doppler effects be distinguishable on the basis of the shapes of the ...
7
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4answers
1k views

What does ionization of neutral Hydrogen have to do with “transparency”?

Most accounts of the early history of the Universe make some reference to (re)ionization as being the reason that the Universe becomes transparent after a period of opacity caused by the absence of ...
5
votes
2answers
354 views

Why is there spectral lines at all?

My somewhat basic understanding of the concept comes from lectures I've attended about the Bohr-model, which explains the phenomena as arising from the fact that certain configurations of an atom can ...
2
votes
1answer
592 views

What's the difference between NMR and EPR?

Both NMR and EPR describe the response of magnetic spin to external field. When collecting data, how do you know you're looking at nucleus spin flip or electron spin flip? In other words, since every ...
6
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1answer
3k views

How do we determine what distant planets, stars etc are made of?

I remember this being covered somewhat back in school and I have casually read about it. I know it involves inferring from spectral analysis what physical properties an object may have right? Though ...
3
votes
1answer
234 views

What determines the form of the intensity curves in Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) measurements?

What determines the form of the intensity spectra of different particle species in Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) measurements? See e.g. I figure that bigger particles have more ways to get ...
2
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3answers
242 views

Why is the planck function continuous and not discrete?

If we imagine a object made up of Hydrogen gas that is optically thick to all radiation, and is in thermal equilibrium, then, microscopically, photons will be emitted and absorbed as emission/...
1
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1answer
2k views

What's the difference between microscopy and spectroscopy?

Both methods collect particles or electromagnetic waves, and in both methods it's possible to reconstruct a 2D image, which may represent morphology (AFM, LEED for example), electronic structure (STM, ...
13
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2answers
8k views

Why is a plastic bag transparent in infrared light?

This is a classic trick to do with a IR camera: Bu why is the plastic bag transparent, while the glasses aren't? I've also heard that water is not transparent in IR light. What causes this phenomena?...
5
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1answer
1k views

How can we describe the electrons of multi-electron atoms (i.e. not Hydrogen) when equations/analytic solutions only exist for Hydrogen?

I've been digging into emission spectra of different elements and found that such things as the Rydberg equation, Bohr's model, and quantum mechanics can only fully describe the single electron in the ...
15
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1answer
431 views

Does my green laser pointer emit three distinct frequencies, or is my measurement flawed?

I was playing around with a cheap diffraction grating and my set of laser pointers, and I noticed that while the red and the blue pointers produce a single point in the spectrum, my green laser ...
5
votes
2answers
771 views

Polarisation of Light and Atomic Excitation

How does an atomic transition between ground and excited states depend upon the direction of polarisation of incident light?
5
votes
3answers
5k views

Why is spectrum obtained by sunlight, said to be continuous?

My sir spoke about atomic spectra today. Sir said that, unlike the spectrum obtained by analyzing the sunlight, the spectra of atoms are not continuous. I got a doubt here, i,e even the sunlight ...
3
votes
1answer
124 views

Relative weights in rotational bands of symmetric diatomic molecules

In an old paper, Ehrenfest 1931, the introduction starts off as follows: The band spectra of symmetric diatomic molecules show certain striking differences from those of asymmetric molecules. For ...
3
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1answer
3k views

Bleaching groundstate

I'm reading an article about two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy and I don't understand the following sentence. Bleach or stimulated emission contributions yield negative signals. What are "...
1
vote
1answer
355 views

Where to find detailed measured emission spectra of all chemical elements?

I'd like to have something like this, but for single atoms and with more extended range of wavelengths. All I could find e.g. for hydrogen was lots of talks about Rydberg formula etc. and plots of ...
1
vote
1answer
364 views

Non Adiabatic Coupling Term in Born Oppenheimer Approximation

I am attaching a section from a text book (Conical Intersections Electronic Structure, dynamics and spectroscopy: David R Yarkony & Horst Koppel). Here I am not understanding the so called 'Non ...
3
votes
3answers
3k views

Why do stars have absorption spectra?

Absorption spectra are a result of light of a certain wavelength exciting an atom from a lower energy level to a higher one and at the same time being absorbed. However, the atom should eventually go ...
2
votes
2answers
3k views

How do electron configuration microstates map to term symbols?

I am trying to understand energy levels of electron configurations. I visited the NIST web site and discovered that the notation used here are called term symbols. After reading corresponding ...
2
votes
4answers
478 views

Machine to identify substances

I was looking at Wikipedia's article on mass spectrometers, and realized that the method described was to heat a sample into its gas phase and separate the ions by mass using a large magnet. While I ...
2
votes
3answers
979 views

Unstable energy levels

Well, reading about "Raman Effect" I saw that when the electron absorb some energy, with frequency $ \omega_{abs} $, that is different from $ \omega_{n} - \omega_{n-1} \neq \omega_{abs1} $, it go to ...
1
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2answers
93 views

Doppler spectroscopy to verify Earth's speed around the sun

I'm looking for data points to check changes in $z$ as the Earth moves towards and away from a star. I'm finding lots of data for various objects [1] but lots of variation too (for eg, the results for ...
1
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1answer
303 views

Resonant vs. Non-resonant Raman

What does it mean to say that the conventional Raman effect is non-resonant? And, how/why does resonant Raman give a stronger signal than the non-resonant type?
1
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0answers
80 views

What's the difference between “spectromicroscopy” and “microspectroscopy”? [duplicate]

Both definitions that I found are rather vague. (Related question: What's the difference between microscopy and spectroscopy?)
0
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3answers
242 views

Having trouble understanding spectral lines

In my notes I wrote that Rutherford's model of the atom could not explain spectral lines, because that is what my textbook says. I'm not really sure about the details of spectral lines though. I know ...
0
votes
2answers
20 views

What combination of stable GE isotopes make up the germanium in a Ge(Li) spectrometer

I work with a Ge(Li) gamma spectrometer. I'm trying to work out the different populations of stable Germanium isotopes in it. I'm trying to model the unrealistic scenario where none of these isotopes ...
0
votes
2answers
967 views

What is decay associated spectra?

What is decay associated spectra? Suppose we measure the fluorescence intensity over different wavelengths and over time, we get: $$I(\lambda,t) = \sum_i^n \alpha_i(\lambda) \exp(\frac{-t}{\tau_i}).$...