The special theory of relativity describes the motion and dynamics of objects moving at significant fractions of the speed of light.

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Speed=mass=time? [closed]

I was wondering why objects gain mass with speed? How can we measure speed if there is no truly stationary point to measure from? And if an object comes to a stand still will it loose its mass? ...
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What are the eigenvalues of the Lorentz matrix?

The Lorentz matrix defines the transformation of a four-vector between different frames of reference, such that $$ p^{'\mu} = \Lambda^{\mu}_{\ \ \nu}p^{\nu} $$ where in this example $p^{\mu}$ is the ...
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The speed of light and unstable matter

Mr.E is on a luxury spaceship travelling about 1/2 the speed of light and finds a cubic lump of unstable matter(attached to a bomb) in his cabin. He of course is an expert with bombs but this device ...
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“Imaginary” Perfect Time

In the definition (in one spatial dimension) of $\Delta \tau$ there is the relation: $(\Delta \tau)^2 = (\Delta t)^2 - (\Delta x)^2$ which is invariant. If $(\Delta x)^2 > (\Delta t)^2$ then there ...
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Electromagnetism and the principle of relativity

I'm reading the book "Fundamental Physics 2: Electromagnetism" by Alonso and Finn. I understand everything up to the point where everything is "unified". The following example is given in the book: ...
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What's the relationship between $SL(2,\mathbb{C})$, $SU(2)\times SU(2)$ and $SO(1,3)$?

I'm a beginner of QFT. Ref. 1 states that [...] The Lorentz group $SO(1,3)$ is then essentially $SU(2)\times SU(2)$. But how is it possible, because $SU(2)\times SU(2)$ is a compact Lie group ...
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Relativistic Transverse Doppler Effect

In Minkowski spacetime, two observers, A and B, are moving at uniform speeds u and v, respectively, along different trajectories, each parallel to the y-axis of some inertial frame S. Observer A emits ...
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What is the resolution to this apparent contradiction?

Momentum is defined as $$p = \gamma m_0 v$$ And here is another law $$E^2=(m_0c^2)^2+(pc)^2$$ And this website says the energy of a red photon is $1.9074 eV$. Also, light has a rest mass of $0$. The ...
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About the speed of light

If Mr. E is aboard a spaceship traveling near the speed of light the usual reason for the spaceship not going faster than $c$ is the (relativistic) mass of the ship increases without bound, I think. ...
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Why do we set $x^0 = ct$ instead of $x^0 = t$?

When we deal with Special Relativity and we start considering spacetime instead of space and time each at once, we usually see books saying that we consider a space with four coordinate $x^\alpha$ ...
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What if photons are not the fastest particles?

Einstein originally thought that special relativity was about light and how it always travelled at the same speed. Nowadays, we think that special relativity is about the idea that there is some ...
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Lagrangian for relativistic massless particle

For relativistic massive particle, the action is $$S ~=~ -m_0 \int ds ~=~ -m_0 \int d\lambda ~(\dot x ^\mu \dot x_\mu)^{\frac{1}{2}} ~=~ \int d\lambda \ L,$$ where $ds$ is the proper time of the ...
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Concerning a previous possible tachyon observation? [duplicate]

A few years ago there was a story about the Large Hadron Collider where a possible tachyon was supposedly observed. It was later shown it didn't occur yet the incident made me think. If a large ...
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Relativistic addition of velocities of spaceships

If Spaceship 1 is traveling at speed $.5c$ relative to Earth, and Spaceship 2 is traveling at speed $.3c$ relative to Earth in the same direction, what does Spaceship 2 see Spaceship 1's speed as? I ...
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Zero photon energy in moving frame

Suppose I have a photon with energy $E$ (in its rest frame) moving along the $z$ direction with momentum $\mathbf{p} = p_z\mathbf{\hat{z}}$: The Lorentz transform in the laboratory frame should be: ...
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Time dilation in special relativity

Suppose a star ship is moving with some velocity. Two light pulses one in direction similar to star ship another opposite to it is shot towards the space ship. Then how time inside space ship adjust ...
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Minkowski Metric Signature

When I learned about the Minkowski Space and it's coordinates, it was explained such that the metric turns out to be $$ ds^{2} = -(cdx^{0})^{2} +(dx^{1})^{2} + (dx^{2})^{2} + (dx^{3})^{2} $$ where $ ...
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Breaking the speed of light relative to a moving object [duplicate]

You can't go faster than light, and light can't be additive (if you shine a light from a spaceship, the light is not going $c$+"speed of spaceship", it's just going like it always does). But what ...
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Detecting absolute motion inside a box

This is not a contradiction and I know it is impossible but still consider a thought experiment by me and point out if something is wrong. See the following picture and then the explanation follows. ...
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How an accelerated object sees another accelerated body in special relativity?

Assume two objects are moving with a constant acceleration $a_1$ and $a_2$, which are the measured accelerations by respective object (or constant force being applied to each of the objects). My ...
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Apparent velocity of an approaching object

What would be the apparent velocity of an object approaching us at an actual velocity of $v$? I know $cv/c-v$ is a possible answer but here's another argument - shouldn't the velocity be the Doppler ...
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Why is $\phi$ constant in the hyperbolic Lorentz transforms?

If two spacetime events are separated by $(dx,dy,dz,dt),(dx',dy',dz',dt)$ in two reference frames $K,K'$ respectively, whose relative motion is purely along the $x$-axis, then, purely due to the ...
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Distance Between Two Photons Calculated in Different Inertial Frames

I am a self-studier. This is a question from a text I am studying: The distance between two photons traveling along the $x$-axis of an inertial frame, $S$, is always $l$. Show that in a second ...
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Angles between axes after Lorentz transformations

Consider frame $K_1, K_2, K_3$ such that $K_1$ moves along the $y$ axis of $K_2$ with speed $v$ and $K_2$ moves along the $x$ axis of $K_3$ with speed $u$. Find the angle between the $x$ axis of $K_1$ ...
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velocity in inertial and nontial frames

I got confused about the difference between the last term of both pictures. In the first one, we have w x r, but in the second we have w x r underlined. Does anyone have a better explanation? They ...
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Why is the Faraday Tensor derived from the Lorentz force?

If we start from the Lorentz force, $$\textbf{F}=q\textbf{E} +q\textbf{v}\times\textbf{B}$$ and use the four velocity u$^{\mu}$ and the four momentum p$^{\nu}$, then we get to ...
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The scissor paradox: can we pass the information faster than light? [duplicate]

click to view the image Before I start, I want to say that this is not a duplicate of "Is it possible for information to be transmitted faster than light by using a rigid pole?", Since point A is ...
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Query into the cumulative velocity of mounted platforms

Consider throwing a stone at an object from rest, it travels at Vms-1. Now throw that stone whilst running at Ums-1. It seems in the latter scenario the total speed of stone is V + U. Now imagine ...
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Relativistic Elastic Collision

I am having trouble getting my head around the transfer of energy in a relativistic elastic collision. My understanding of a relativistic elastic collision is one in which the total rest mass on each ...
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Electron distribution around atom when moving

I do not have much experience on this but if an atom has some electrons around nucleus and the atom itself it is moving at some speed does that affect the distribution of electrons around? I am ...
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How do we know that photons are exactly massless and travel exactly with speed $c$ in vacuum?

I know that this question may sound stupid, but what I mean is that photons have some energy and no mass, yet the mass and energy are said to be equivalent (or maybe I got that part wrong). In an ...
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Colliding particles at speeds aproaching c [closed]

(In natural units where $\hbar=c=1$.) Two particles are to be collided. Each of these particles has a rest mass of 0.9 GeV and they will be collided at equal but opposite speeds. What is the minimum ...
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State of constant motion

Why does an object remains in its state of constant motion if there are no forces acting on that object? My understanding is that all the energy of the motion will be kept inside and a change in the ...
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Is the existence of electromagnetic standing waves dependent on the observers reference frame?

If I take two plane EM waves travelling in opposite direction e.g. $E = E_0 \sin(kx-\omega t)$ and $E=E_o \sin (kx + \omega t)$, they sum to give a standing wave with a time-averaged Poynting vector ...
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Is speed of light ( Sun-to-Earth ) related to the movement speed of solar system?

The speed of light has been measured to be 299 792 458 m/s. Now, the Solar System is traveling at an average speed of 828,000 km/h (230 000 m/s). Summing up the numbers we get close to 300 000 000 m/s ...
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Taking signal travel time into account in Special Relativity

I am having problems taking the time it takes for a light signal from an event to reach an observer into account: For instance, if we have two observers $A$ and $B$ who synchronize their clocks when ...
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Learning the stress-energy tensor

I am learning dynamics in special relativity and come across the stress-energy tensor. I have real trouble understanding it. I would love answers on How to motivate the definition of this tensor. ...
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Magnetism due to relativity?

So I have been reading in some books that magnetism does not have to be assumed a priori, but can be obtained from the electric field + special relativity. And I have seen how this leads to the common ...
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What happens when relativistic effects stop?

I'm currently learning special relativity in high school and we only primarily deal with what happens when an object is moving at constant relativistic speeds. But what if the object slowed back down ...
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Is there a graphical representation of the Lorentz transformation equations?

I always loved theoretical physics as a kid and when I came upon this site while seeking computer advice via superuser I had to stick my silly little head into an oasis of intelligence. I have often ...
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Are there 'special' cases for when special relativity can be applied for accelerating bodies?

I have the following theoretical situation: A space station modeled as a ring in free space is rotating about its centre point at a high speed. I am trying to work out where time flows slower. From ...
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Velocity measurement in relativistic perspectives

I understand the precepts of relativistic time dilation, but I'm looking to nail down the local perception of velocity in each frame. My question is threefold: Given two observers $A$ (rest frame) ...
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In Minkowski space, why does the hyperboloid appear to each observer as a circle whose radius is increasing faster than the speed of light?

I read the assumption in the above question in the paper Hyperbolic geometry on a Hyperboloid by William F. Reynolds (see here, page 444), but it was not clarified further (the discussion was rather ...
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Homogeneity of space implies linearity of Lorentz transformations

In the derivation of Lorentz transformations, the Wikipedia article mentions a couple of times that the linearity comes from the homogeneity of space. I am looking for a thorough explanation on this. ...
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Non-relativistic limit in a Lagrangian density

What criteria should I consider when determining the non-relativistic limit of a Lagrangian density? For example, how would I take the non-relativistic limit of the following Lagrangian density: ...
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How can photons interact with anything?

I read photons do not age because they move at the speed of light. So when a photon interacts with my eyes, aren't they apart in space-time by the difference of the time in the frame of reference of ...
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Speed of light that is traveling away from the observer

The second postulate of Special Relativity states: The speed of light in a vacuum is the same for all observers, regardless of their motion relative to the source. Now imagine the observer ...
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Can relativistic momentum (photons) be used as propulsion for 'free' after the initial generation?

In discussing this question about propelling a spacecraft with photons and their relativistic momentum, the author asked that I restate my comment as another question. If photons can really be used ...
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Relativistic momentum finding

Kinetic energy of an object $mc^2$. I want to evaluate the momentum. We know Kinetic energy, $$E_k = \frac{p^2}{2m}$$ $$mc^2 = \frac{p^2}{2m}$$ $$ p = \sqrt{2}mc$$ Note that the momentum is the ...
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How did the scientific community receive Einstein's theories when he published them? [closed]

By now, we have had multiple indications through observations and experiments that Einstein's theories on general and special relativity are correct. We recently had our second observation of ...