The special theory of relativity describes the motion and dynamics of objects moving at significant fractions of the speed of light.

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Perceived direction of light emitted in moving reference frame

I was thinking the other day about the simple example used to demonstrate time dilation effects and to derive the Lorrentz factor - where the time it takes for a light pulse to be emitted, bounce of a ...
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2 questions on 4-velocity

Firstly 4-velocity is defined by $u^\mu=\frac{dx^\mu}{d\tau}$ let us consider the component $x_i$ of $x^\mu$ then this derivative can be written as: ...
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43 views

Clock synchronazation in special relativity using signal other than light

I'm reading Taylor & Wheeler "Spacetime Physics" and have a question about possibility of correct clock synch using signal other then light. For example, we choose reference clock(A) and at ...
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86 views

Spin in relativity

Mass and spin of the particle are used in classification of elementary particles. The mass is defined to be a Lorentz invariant quantity. On the other hand, the spin is a spacelike 4-vector and cannot ...
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79 views

Why don't we experience dilatations in Minkowski spacetime?

The question This question follows on from the use of projective coords for spacetime in Notation for Translation Group Generators . Under Felix Klein's Erlangen Program, Minkowski spacetime starts ...
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566 views

Why does Coulomb's law not hold for fast moving charges?

We all remember calculating the electric force of interaction between a stationary nucleus and a revolving electron using Coulomb's law. The electron in this case is moving. Here's what I think about ...
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47 views

Since “coordinate time” has a very specific meaning, how to call more general parametrizations?

Recently I've learned that "coordinate time" assigned to a particular time-like spacetime path is not only required (1) to be monotonous and continuous and even differentiable wrt. the "proper time" ...
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254 views

A question on an exercise from Gravitation by Misner, Thorne and Wheeler

My question is on problem 4.1 of Gravitation. In a generic case of electric field and magnetic field(i.e not $E=0$ or $B=0$ or $E$ and $B$ perpendicular), define the direction $\hat{n}$ unit vector , ...
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Explain polarization in RF in which the conductor is stationary

Consider a metal rod parallel to $x$-axis moving with velocity $\vec v =(0,v,0)$ perpendicular to magnetic field $\vec B=(0,0,B)$. Lorentz force will give rise to the electric field $\vec E = - ...
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4-acceleration of rotating frame

Consider the 3-dimensional Minkowski space $$ ds^2=dt'^2-dr'^2-r'^2d\phi'^2 $$ Now we transform it into a rotating frame: $$ t'=t,r'=r,\phi'=\phi+\omega t $$ Then the metric becomes $$ ...
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95 views

Hyperbolic Cosine and Sine in Terms of 3-D Velocity

Intuitively, why are $\cosh(\theta) = \frac{1}{\sqrt{1-(v/c)^2}}$ and $\sinh(\theta) = \frac{v/c}{\sqrt{1-(v/c)^2}}$ true in special relativity? Is there some picture I can draw in Minkowski space ...
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102 views

Are there 'special' cases for when special relativity can be applied for accelerating bodies?

I have the following theoretical situation: A space station modeled as a ring in free space is rotating about its centre point at a high speed. I am trying to work out where time flows slower. From ...
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198 views

Including special relativistic effects in momentum in Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle

I've been told that an electron is somewhere within the space of $10^{-10}m$ and am supposed to find the uncertainty in its velocity. Simply applying $m\Delta x \Delta v \geq \frac{h}{4\pi}$ results ...
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96 views

Integral of energy-momentum tensor

On Weinberg's Gravitation and Cosmology section 8 chapter 2, he introduced the energy-momentum tensor of a system of $n$ particals: $$ ...
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217 views

Twin Paradox - different approaches

What was the difference between Langevin's approach to the twin paradox and Max Von Laue's? I don't understand how Langevin tried to use the idea of absolute acceleration to explain the distinction in ...
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59 views

Moving Clocks Time Problem

http://www.pitt.edu/~jdnorton/teaching/HPS_0410/chapters/Special_relativity_rel_sim/index.html Talking about the situation of clocks shown on this page. Clocks A&B. Now suppose clock B is moving ...
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97 views

Time-Independent Gravitational Equation?

Is it possible to calculate gravitational induced position change without requiring the use of time (and therefore, acceleration) anywhere in the equation? If such an equation were to be discovered, ...
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132 views

Quantum Eraser under Lorentz Boost

Suppose I am conducting the Quantum Eraser experiment. The results of this experiment are easy to understand with the traditional quantum mechanical interpretation of a pair of entangled photons. ...
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124 views

Space contraction: what do we see

This is my opinion about what we will see. When the pipe arrive at the bar, we will be unable to see some part of it anymore (the pipe will absorb the light emitted by the bar), even if the pipe and ...
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248 views

Non-zero charge density due to Lorentz contraction in current carrying wires

In trying to answer this question I came across the following problem. The original question relates to the idea that what looks like a magnetic field in one reference frame, ends up as an ...
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53 views

Do two synchronous clocks have simultaneous indications?

Considering two clocks, $C$ and $D$, which were at rest to each other throughout a sufficiently extended trial, and given their time parametrizations $t_C : {\text{ ordered set of}}C{\text{'s ...
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75 views

Time reversal invariance and statistics

To what extend does the behaviour of time reversal invariance depend on the statistics of the particle under consideration? More explicitly: To what extend does the action of the time reversal ...
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101 views

Direct sum of the spinors and EM field tensor

EM field tensor refer to the direct sum of $(1, 0), (0, 1)$ spinor representation of the Lorentz group. How to show it? Each of these spinor representations corresponds to the symmetrical spinor ...
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195 views

Relations between fields transforming by Lorentz and Poincare groups

We can analyze fields transforming by the Lorentz group as $(m, n)$ representations, where $m,n$ are the max eigenvalues of two SU(2) operators, which generate the irreducible representation of the ...
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63 views

Transformation of $t=0$ line in moving frame of reference

How does $t=0$ transform into $t - vx/c^2 = 0$ if a frame of reference is moving as given in here? It seems that the relativistic transformation is given by $$ \begin{bmatrix} x' \\ ct' ...
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106 views

Wick rotation and special relativity

CMIIW, but as I understand it, Wick rotation replaces the Minkowski basis (t,x,y,z) with the Euclidean basis (it,x,y,z). Suppose that $t_2=t_1 \cosh \beta+x_1 \sinh \beta$ and $x_2=t_1 \sinh \beta+x_1 ...
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45 views

Calculate the acceleration of the trailing muon bunch

Two separate suitably short but intense bunches of muons, "A" and "B", are both supposed to be constantly accelerating (in an otherwise sufficiently flat region) with constant proper acceleration ...
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232 views

Does Mansuripur's Paradox involve fictitious charges?

Mansuripur's Paradox involves a magnet moving at relativistic speeds in an external electric field. Additional: thanks to Retarded Potential, who found the original paper. If I understand correctly, ...
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233 views

Matrix manipulation for Dirac matrices

From the Dirac equation in gamma matrices, we know that $$\gamma^i=\begin{pmatrix} 0 & \sigma^i \\ -\sigma^i & 0 \end{pmatrix}$$ and $$\gamma^0=\begin{pmatrix} I & 0 \\ 0 & -I ...
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335 views

Newton's gravitational constant $G$, the reduced Planck constant $\hbar$, the speed of light $c$: the Dream Team of moderators?

The three great constants of Nature are well known: the speed of light $c$ (special relativity), the reduced Planck constant $\hbar$ (quantum mechanics), Newton's ...
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281 views

Could one transmit a signal with equally-tuned casimir plates across the quantum field?

It seems, one could exploit the Casimir effect to send messages across arbitrarily-large distances with carefully-tuned Casimir plates. Obviously, relativity would preclude FTL information transfer, ...
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569 views

How equivalent are heat energy and work energy in connection with a spinning flywheel?

Let's say we have two identical spinning flywheels, that have arbitrary geometry, and are made of copper. Now we apply some heat energy at the center point of flywheel A, causing it to slow down a ...
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Linkal causality in special relativity

I have a slight variation of the barn / ladder paradox, where there is a ladder too long to fit into a barn at rest, but when moving at a sufficient speed, it is length contracted with regards to the ...
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Path of light and gravitational waves

Now that gravitational waves are detected, the way they are detected was using laser beams and they were out of phase when the return from the same trip distance. Does this means it is based on ...
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Is it accurate to say that nothing can travel faster than c in a GR context, where more space can be created?

Years ago, my brother and I had an argument where I was trying to convince him that nothing could travel faster than the speed of light. I was pursuing this in the context of Special Relativity. My ...
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Representations of spinors

I'm trying to understand spinors but I haven't found a good explanation of how to derive them. I'm generally interested. I read that there is a representation of SO(3) as spinors, and also that there ...
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36 views

What is conformal symmetry physically?

I'm reading a paper by t'Hooft http://arxiv.org/abs/1410.6675. There is an argument in the paper that I could not understand: "Now that system, described by Maxwell’s equations, does have conformal ...
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Decay of lepton into meson and neutrino using four-momentum

I'm learning about how to use four-momentums and am working through a problem involving the decay of a charged lepton into a charged meson and neutrino. The equation would be: $L^+ \to M^+ + \nu$ ...
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43 views

If humanity was to send a probe to Proxima Centauri, how long would the travel last?

If humanity was to send a probe to the nearest star: Proxima Centauri, at a distance of 4.24 light years from our sun, what would be the optimal propulsion technology to reach the destination as soon ...
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65 views

Significance of x in the Lorentz equation for time

Why does the term x appear in the Lorentz transformation equation for time? What is its significance?
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68 views

Confusion regarding step in Einstein's 1905 paper on the electrodynamics of moving bodies

Could someone explain this step in Einstein's 1905 paper on the electrodynamics of moving bodies. I tried differentiating both sides of the first equation and still don't arrive at the second one, ...
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40 views

What Would One Observe of a Calendar on Earth, Given a Round Trip to Another Star and back?

I want to ask a clarifying series of questions on what I think is a relatively simple scenario. It's a long one but I've tried to word it as simply as I can manage while trying to do the question ...
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72 views

Equation of motion of a free particle

We know that the equation of motion of particle can be derived from the respective action. But in the book I am reading, the author is saying: ... timelike worldline of a massive particle is ...
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48 views

Electron positron collision producing mesons

An electron of an energy 9 GeV and a positron of energy E collide to produce a $B^0$ and anti-$B^0$ meson, each with a mass of 5.3 GeV. What is the minimum positron energy required to produce the ...
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Momentarily Comoving Reference Frame Question

Consider a reference frame $S'$ moving with constant velocity $\vec{V}$ relative to a second nonrotating reference frame $S$. Also consider a particle moving along a trajectory $\vec{r}$ with perhaps ...
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36 views

Construct fields from from unitary representation of Poincaré group

I am trying to understand how construct fields from unitary representation of Poincaré group and the reasoning that Weinberg give in his book is the cluster decomposition principle and Lorentz ...
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39 views

Does time dilation affect the speed of a moving object?

Imagine you are traveling at 99% of the speed of light. Will the speed of the moving object slow down for both objects and for the resting observer or either one?
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Can an event occur before or after the other one depending on what frame of reference we are in?

Two buses moving relative to each other with 30% the speed of light (4 light-min apart). Now by some mysterious way bus 1 comes to the knowledge that after 3 min-bus 2 time bus 2 is going to explode. ...
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Real and relative velocity formula

What i need is a thing more complicated than the usual relative velocity formula. Imagine a radar. You are at the center, moving at some angle, but lets make it clear, you are always at the center. ...
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Why do we sum relativistic intervals in relativistic action of a massive point-particle, and not a function from it?

Relativistic action as follows (which should explain relativistic motion of a classical particle): $$ S = C \Delta s=C\int ds $$ Where $C$ is some constant and $\Delta s$ is relativistic interval. ...