The special theory of relativity describes the motion and dynamics of objects moving at significant fractions of the speed of light.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (3)

1
vote
0answers
42 views

Are there 'special' cases for when special relativity can be applied for accelerating bodies?

I have the following theoretical situation: A space station modeled as a ring in free space is rotating about its centre point at a high speed. I am trying to work out where time flows slower. From ...
1
vote
1answer
41 views

Velocity measurement in relativistic perpsectives

I understand the precepts of relativistic time dilation, but I'm looking to nail down the local perception of velocity in each frame. this has three parts, with the second being the most complex ...
1
vote
1answer
55 views

In Minkowski space, why does the hyperboloid appear to each observer as a circle whose radius is increasing faster than the speed of light?

I read the assumption in the above question in the paper Hyperbolic geometry on a Hyperboloid by William F. Reynolds (see here, page 444), but it was not clarified further (the discussion was rather ...
4
votes
1answer
95 views

Homogeneity of space implies linearity of Lorentz transformations

In the derivation of Lorentz transformations, the Wikipedia article mentions a couple of times that the linearity comes from the homogeneity of space. I am looking for a thorough explanation on this. ...
4
votes
1answer
117 views

Non-relativistic limit in a Lagrangian density

What criteria should I consider when determining the non-relativistic limit of a Lagrangian density? For example, how would I take the non-relativistic limit of the following Lagrangian density: ...
6
votes
2answers
453 views

How can photons interact with anything?

I read photons do not age because they move at the speed of light. So when a photon interacts with my eyes, aren't they apart in space-time by the difference of the time in the frame of reference of ...
0
votes
2answers
111 views

Speed of light that is traveling away from the observer

The second postulate of Special Relativity states: The speed of light in a vacuum is the same for all observers, regardless of their motion relative to the source. Now imagine the observer ...
0
votes
1answer
40 views

Can relativistic momentum (photons) be used as propulsion for 'free' after the initial generation?

In discussing this question about propelling a spacecraft with photons and their relativistic momentum, the author asked that I restate my comment as another question. If photons can really be used ...